Reminders for Pet Care

We send reminders, both mail and email, to our clients and patients in the Abilene Big Country area, when important veterinary services are needed..

In the past, have you ever received a reminder telling you Fido was due for something and you had no idea what it was? At Windmill Animal Hospital, your pet’s email reminders have a link to our website, detailing the important health care service your pet needs. With regular mail reminders, you can simply come here to our website, and select the needed service you want to learn more about.

For detailed information, please click on the REMINDER your pet received.

BORDETELLA (ORAL) 6 MOS BOOSTER

Our records show it’s time to administer a Bordetella vaccine to your dog or puppy. Bordetella is an upper respiratory infection complex of dogs and puppies. It is also known as “kennel cough,” although many dogs with Bordetella infection have never been to a kennel! When your dog has kennel cough, you might think he has something stuck in his throat. The cough associated with acute infectious tracheobronchitis, (ITB) or kennel cough, is a high-pitched, honk-like cough, sometimes followed by retching. Infected dogs can also sneeze frequently.

Kennel cough is a highly contagious inflammation of the trachea (windpipe) and bronchial tree caused by a contagious virus (adenovirus, parainfluenza virus) or bacterium (Bordetella bronchiseptica). The infectious agents can be transmitted through the air, by direct contact with an infected dog (such as touching noses or barking through a fence) or by contact with contaminated surfaces. Your dog is at risk of exposure to kennel cough any time he/she is boarded, groomed, at the park, at obedience class, or anywhere dogs congregate. In addition, your dog is at risk of exposure if any of your neighbors’ dogs are boarded, groomed, at the park, etc, because your neighbors’ dogs can expose YOUR dog just by touching noses through the fence!

The Bordetella vaccine is highly effective at preventing most cases of Kennel Cough. However, duration of immunity studies have shown that the antibodies given by the vaccine only last 6-10 months. Therefore, your dog should be vaccinated at least annually for Bordetella. High-risk dogs, such as show dogs or performance-competition dogs, should be vaccinated every 6 months. It’s the cheapest form of “insurance” available! Since the vaccine is administered in a nose-drop form, your dog isn’t subjected to any discomfort.

In puppies, Bordetella vaccine is typically administered twice, at 10 weeks and 14 weeks. After that, the vaccine is administered every 6 to 12 months, depending on the puppy’s lifestyle and risk factors.

BORDETELLA 6 MONTH BOOSTER
Our records show it’s time to administer a Bordetella vaccine to your dog or puppy. Bordetella is an upper respiratory infection complex of dogs and puppies. It is also known as “kennel cough,” although many dogs with Bordetella infection have never been to a kennel! When your dog has kennel cough, you might think he has something stuck in his throat. The cough associated with acute infectious tracheobronchitis, (ITB) or kennel cough, is a high-pitched, honk-like cough, sometimes followed by retching. Infected dogs can also sneeze frequently.

Kennel cough is a highly contagious inflammation of the trachea (windpipe) and bronchial tree caused by a contagious virus (adenovirus, parainfluenza virus) or bacterium (Bordetella bronchiseptica). The infectious agents can be transmitted through the air, by direct contact with an infected dog (such as touching noses or barking through a fence) or by contact with contaminated surfaces. Your dog is at risk of exposure to kennel cough any time he/she is boarded, groomed, at the park, at obedience class, or anywhere dogs congregate. In addition, your dog is at risk of exposure if any of your neighbors’ dogs are boarded, groomed, at the park, etc, because your neighbors’ dogs can expose YOUR dog just by touching noses through the fence!

The Bordetella vaccine is highly effective at preventing most cases of Kennel Cough. However, duration of immunity studies have shown that the antibodies given by the vaccine only last 6-10 months. Therefore, your dog should be vaccinated at least annually for Bordetella. High-risk dogs, such as show dogs or performance-competition dogs, should be vaccinated every 6 months. It’s the cheapest form of “insurance” available! Since the vaccine is administered in a nose-drop form, your dog isn’t subjected to any discomfort.

In puppies, Bordetella vaccine is typically administered twice, at 10 weeks and 14 weeks. After that, the vaccine is administered every 6 to 12 months, depending on the puppy’s lifestyle and risk factors.

BORDETELLA FIRST VAC
Our records show it’s time to administer a Bordetella vaccine to your dog or puppy. Bordetella is an upper respiratory infection complex of dogs and puppies. It is also known as “kennel cough,” although many dogs with Bordetella infection have never been to a kennel! When your dog has kennel cough, you might think he has something stuck in his throat. The cough associated with acute infectious tracheobronchitis, (ITB) or kennel cough, is a high-pitched, honk-like cough, sometimes followed by retching. Infected dogs can also sneeze frequently.

Kennel cough is a highly contagious inflammation of the trachea (windpipe) and bronchial tree caused by a contagious virus (adenovirus, parainfluenza virus) or bacterium (Bordetella bronchiseptica). The infectious agents can be transmitted through the air, by direct contact with an infected dog (such as touching noses or barking through a fence) or by contact with contaminated surfaces. Your dog is at risk of exposure to kennel cough any time he/she is boarded, groomed, at the park, at obedience class, or anywhere dogs congregate. In addition, your dog is at risk of exposure if any of your neighbors’ dogs are boarded, groomed, at the park, etc, because your neighbors’ dogs can expose YOUR dog just by touching noses through the fence!

The Bordetella vaccine is highly effective at preventing most cases of Kennel Cough. However, duration of immunity studies have shown that the antibodies given by the vaccine only last 6-10 months. Therefore, your dog should be vaccinated at least annually for Bordetella. High-risk dogs, such as show dogs or performance-competition dogs, should be vaccinated every 6 months. It’s the cheapest form of “insurance” available! Since the vaccine is administered in a nose-drop form, your dog isn’t subjected to any discomfort.

In puppies, Bordetella vaccine is typically administered twice, at 10 weeks and 14 weeks. After that, the vaccine is administered every 6 to 12 months, depending on the puppy’s lifestyle and risk factors.

BORDETELLA SECOND VAC
Our records show it’s time to administer a Bordetella vaccine to your dog or puppy. Bordetella is an upper respiratory infection complex of dogs and puppies. It is also known as “kennel cough,” although many dogs with Bordetella infection have never been to a kennel! When your dog has kennel cough, you might think he has something stuck in his throat. The cough associated with acute infectious tracheobronchitis, (ITB) or kennel cough, is a high-pitched, honk-like cough, sometimes followed by retching. Infected dogs can also sneeze frequently.

Kennel cough is a highly contagious inflammation of the trachea (windpipe) and bronchial tree caused by a contagious virus (adenovirus, parainfluenza virus) or bacterium (Bordetella bronchiseptica). The infectious agents can be transmitted through the air, by direct contact with an infected dog (such as touching noses or barking through a fence) or by contact with contaminated surfaces. Your dog is at risk of exposure to kennel cough any time he/she is boarded, groomed, at the park, at obedience class, or anywhere dogs congregate. In addition, your dog is at risk of exposure if any of your neighbors’ dogs are boarded, groomed, at the park, etc, because your neighbors’ dogs can expose YOUR dog just by touching noses through the fence!

The Bordetella vaccine is highly effective at preventing most cases of Kennel Cough. However, duration of immunity studies have shown that the antibodies given by the vaccine only last 6-10 months. Therefore, your dog should be vaccinated at least annually for Bordetella. High-risk dogs, such as show dogs or performance-competition dogs, should be vaccinated every 6 months. It’s the cheapest form of “insurance” available! Since the vaccine is administered in a nose-drop form, your dog isn’t subjected to any discomfort.

In puppies, Bordetella vaccine is typically administered twice, at 10 weeks and 14 weeks. After that, the vaccine is administered every 6 to 12 months, depending on the puppy’s lifestyle and risk factors.

Bravecto 4.4 – 9.9 lbs, 2 pack
Bravecto is the FIRST oral chew to deliver flea and tick protection for up to 12 full weeks. It provides consistent, broad-spectrum, and long-lasting efficacy against both fleas and ticks. Bravecto is also amazingly safe: the FDA has approved Bravecto for use in breeding, pregnant and nursing dogs.

Because of Bravecto’s proven 90-day efficacy and safety, the Doctors of Windmill Animal Hospital have discontinued prescribing Nexgard monthly chewable flea & tick control tablets.

Dog owners love only having to give 4 chewable tablets a year for complete flea and tick prevention! Even better, Bravecto won’t wash off, cause a mess or smell like a topical product will. It gets even better, though: Bravecto is significantly cheaper to use than monthly Nexgard chewable tablets or monthly topical products!!

Bravecto kills 100% of newly arriving fleas within 24 hours for 12 weeks. Even better, Bravecto kills fleas so quickly that most flea-allergic dogs have little or no flea allergy dermatitis after a flea exposure. Bravecto starts killing fleas within 2 hours and kills 100% of fleas within 12 hours after treatment.

Bravecto kills 4 tick species: Ixodes scapularis (black-legged tick), Dermacentor variabilis (American dog tick), and Rhipicephalus sanguineus (brown dog tick) for 12 weeks, and Amblyomma americanum (lone star tick) for 8 weeks. Due to Bravecto’s rapid onset of action and speed of kill, ticks seldom have time to engorge or transmit disease.

Bravecto is available by veterinary prescription only, for dogs and puppies at least 6 months of age and 4.4 lbs weight.

Bravecto 44.1 – 88.0 lbs, 2 pack
Bravecto is the FIRST oral chew to deliver flea and tick protection for up to 12 full weeks. It provides consistent, broad-spectrum, and long-lasting efficacy against both fleas and ticks. Bravecto is also amazingly safe: the FDA has approved Bravecto for use in breeding, pregnant and nursing dogs.

Because of Bravecto’s proven 90-day efficacy and safety, the Doctors of Windmill Animal Hospital have discontinued prescribing Nexgard monthly chewable flea & tick control tablets.

Dog owners love only having to give 4 chewable tablets a year for complete flea and tick prevention! Even better, Bravecto won’t wash off, cause a mess or smell like a topical product will. It gets even better, though: Bravecto is significantly cheaper to use than monthly Nexgard chewable tablets or monthly topical products!!

Bravecto kills 100% of newly arriving fleas within 24 hours for 12 weeks. Even better, Bravecto kills fleas so quickly that most flea-allergic dogs have little or no flea allergy dermatitis after a flea exposure. Bravecto starts killing fleas within 2 hours and kills 100% of fleas within 12 hours after treatment.

Bravecto kills 4 tick species: Ixodes scapularis (black-legged tick), Dermacentor variabilis (American dog tick), and Rhipicephalus sanguineus (brown dog tick) for 12 weeks, and Amblyomma americanum (lone star tick) for 8 weeks. Due to Bravecto’s rapid onset of action and speed of kill, ticks seldom have time to engorge or transmit disease.

Bravecto is available by veterinary prescription only, for dogs and puppies at least 6 months of age and 4.4 lbs weight.

Bravecto chew, 22.1 – 44.0 lbs, single
BRAVECTO 90-DAY CHEWABLE FLEA & TICK CONTROL TABLETS

Bravecto is the FIRST oral chew to deliver flea and tick protection for up to 12 full weeks. It provides consistent, broad-spectrum, and long-lasting efficacy against both fleas and ticks. Bravecto is also amazingly safe: the FDA has approved Bravecto for use in breeding, pregnant and nursing dogs.

Because of Bravecto’s proven 90-day efficacy and safety, the Doctors of Windmill Animal Hospital have discontinued prescribing Nexgard monthly chewable flea & tick control tablets.

Dog owners love only having to give 4 chewable tablets a year for complete flea and tick prevention! Even better, Bravecto won’t wash off, cause a mess or smell like a topical product will. It gets even better, though: Bravecto is significantly cheaper to use than monthly Nexgard chewable tablets or monthly topical products!!

Bravecto kills 100% of newly arriving fleas within 24 hours for 12 weeks. Even better, Bravecto kills fleas so quickly that most flea-allergic dogs have little or no flea allergy dermatitis after a flea exposure. Bravecto starts killing fleas within 2 hours and kills 100% of fleas within 12 hours after treatment.

Bravecto kills 4 tick species: Ixodes scapularis (black-legged tick), Dermacentor variabilis (American dog tick), and Rhipicephalus sanguineus (brown dog tick) for 12 weeks, and Amblyomma americanum (lone star tick) for 8 weeks. Due to Bravecto’s rapid onset of action and speed of kill, ticks seldom have time to engorge or transmit disease.

Bravecto is available by veterinary prescription only, for dogs and puppies at least 6 months of age and 4.4 lbs weight.

Bravecto Chew, 4.4 – 9.9 lbs, single
BRAVECTO 90-DAY CHEWABLE FLEA & TICK CONTROL TABLETS

Bravecto is the FIRST oral chew to deliver flea and tick protection for up to 12 full weeks. It provides consistent, broad-spectrum, and long-lasting efficacy against both fleas and ticks. Bravecto is also amazingly safe: the FDA has approved Bravecto for use in breeding, pregnant and nursing dogs.

Because of Bravecto’s proven 90-day efficacy and safety, the Doctors of Windmill Animal Hospital have discontinued prescribing Nexgard monthly chewable flea & tick control tablets.

Dog owners love only having to give 4 chewable tablets a year for complete flea and tick prevention! Even better, Bravecto won’t wash off, cause a mess or smell like a topical product will. It gets even better, though: Bravecto is significantly cheaper to use than monthly Nexgard chewable tablets or monthly topical products!!

Bravecto kills 100% of newly arriving fleas within 24 hours for 12 weeks. Even better, Bravecto kills fleas so quickly that most flea-allergic dogs have little or no flea allergy dermatitis after a flea exposure. Bravecto starts killing fleas within 2 hours and kills 100% of fleas within 12 hours after treatment.

Bravecto kills 4 tick species: Ixodes scapularis (black-legged tick), Dermacentor variabilis (American dog tick), and Rhipicephalus sanguineus (brown dog tick) for 12 weeks, and Amblyomma americanum (lone star tick) for 8 weeks. Due to Bravecto’s rapid onset of action and speed of kill, ticks seldom have time to engorge or transmit disease.

Bravecto is available by veterinary prescription only, for dogs and puppies at least 6 months of age and 4.4 lbs weight.

Bravecto chew, 44.1 – 88.0 lbs, single
BRAVECTO 90-DAY CHEWABLE FLEA & TICK CONTROL TABLETS

Bravecto is the FIRST oral chew to deliver flea and tick protection for up to 12 full weeks. It provides consistent, broad-spectrum, and long-lasting efficacy against both fleas and ticks. Bravecto is also amazingly safe: the FDA has approved Bravecto for use in breeding, pregnant and nursing dogs.

Because of Bravecto’s proven 90-day efficacy and safety, the Doctors of Windmill Animal Hospital have discontinued prescribing Nexgard monthly chewable flea & tick control tablets.

Dog owners love only having to give 4 chewable tablets a year for complete flea and tick prevention! Even better, Bravecto won’t wash off, cause a mess or smell like a topical product will. It gets even better, though: Bravecto is significantly cheaper to use than monthly Nexgard chewable tablets or monthly topical products!!

Bravecto kills 100% of newly arriving fleas within 24 hours for 12 weeks. Even better, Bravecto kills fleas so quickly that most flea-allergic dogs have little or no flea allergy dermatitis after a flea exposure. Bravecto starts killing fleas within 2 hours and kills 100% of fleas within 12 hours after treatment.

Bravecto kills 4 tick species: Ixodes scapularis (black-legged tick), Dermacentor variabilis (American dog tick), and Rhipicephalus sanguineus (brown dog tick) for 12 weeks, and Amblyomma americanum (lone star tick) for 8 weeks. Due to Bravecto’s rapid onset of action and speed of kill, ticks seldom have time to engorge or transmit disease.

Bravecto is available by veterinary prescription only, for dogs and puppies at least 6 months of age and 4.4 lbs weight.

Bravecto chew, 88.1 – 123.0 lbs, single
BRAVECTO 90-DAY CHEWABLE FLEA & TICK CONTROL TABLETS

Bravecto is the FIRST oral chew to deliver flea and tick protection for up to 12 full weeks. It provides consistent, broad-spectrum, and long-lasting efficacy against both fleas and ticks. Bravecto is also amazingly safe: the FDA has approved Bravecto for use in breeding, pregnant and nursing dogs.

Because of Bravecto’s proven 90-day efficacy and safety, the Doctors of Windmill Animal Hospital have discontinued prescribing Nexgard monthly chewable flea & tick control tablets.

Dog owners love only having to give 4 chewable tablets a year for complete flea and tick prevention! Even better, Bravecto won’t wash off, cause a mess or smell like a topical product will. It gets even better, though: Bravecto is significantly cheaper to use than monthly Nexgard chewable tablets or monthly topical products!!

Bravecto kills 100% of newly arriving fleas within 24 hours for 12 weeks. Even better, Bravecto kills fleas so quickly that most flea-allergic dogs have little or no flea allergy dermatitis after a flea exposure. Bravecto starts killing fleas within 2 hours and kills 100% of fleas within 12 hours after treatment.

Bravecto kills 4 tick species: Ixodes scapularis (black-legged tick), Dermacentor variabilis (American dog tick), and Rhipicephalus sanguineus (brown dog tick) for 12 weeks, and Amblyomma americanum (lone star tick) for 8 weeks. Due to Bravecto’s rapid onset of action and speed of kill, ticks seldom have time to engorge or transmit disease.

Bravecto is available by veterinary prescription only, for dogs and puppies at least 6 months of age and 4.4 lbs weight.

Bravecto Chew, 9.9 – 22.0 lbs, single
Bravecto is the FIRST oral chew to deliver flea and tick protection for up to 12 full weeks. It provides consistent, broad-spectrum, and long-lasting efficacy against both fleas and ticks. Bravecto is also amazingly safe: the FDA has approved Bravecto for use in breeding, pregnant and nursing dogs.

Because of Bravecto’s proven 90-day efficacy and safety, the Doctors of Windmill Animal Hospital have discontinued prescribing Nexgard monthly chewable flea & tick control tablets.

Dog owners love only having to give 4 chewable tablets a year for complete flea and tick prevention! Even better, Bravecto won’t wash off, cause a mess or smell like a topical product will. It gets even better, though: Bravecto is significantly cheaper to use than monthly Nexgard chewable tablets or monthly topical products!!

Bravecto kills 100% of newly arriving fleas within 24 hours for 12 weeks. Even better, Bravecto kills fleas so quickly that most flea-allergic dogs have little or no flea allergy dermatitis after a flea exposure. Bravecto starts killing fleas within 2 hours and kills 100% of fleas within 12 hours after treatment.

Bravecto kills 4 tick species: Ixodes scapularis (black-legged tick), Dermacentor variabilis (American dog tick), and Rhipicephalus sanguineus (brown dog tick) for 12 weeks, and Amblyomma americanum (lone star tick) for 8 weeks. Due to Bravecto’s rapid onset of action and speed of kill, ticks seldom have time to engorge or transmit disease.

Bravecto is available by veterinary prescription only, for dogs and puppies at least 6 months of age and 4.4 lbs weight.

Bravecto Chews 22.1 – 44.0 lbs, 2 pack
BRAVECTO 90-DAY CHEWABLE FLEA & TICK CONTROL TABLETS

Bravecto is the FIRST oral chew to deliver flea and tick protection for up to 12 full weeks. It provides consistent, broad-spectrum, and long-lasting efficacy against both fleas and ticks. Bravecto is also amazingly safe: the FDA has approved Bravecto for use in breeding, pregnant and nursing dogs.

Because of Bravecto’s proven 90-day efficacy and safety, the Doctors of Windmill Animal Hospital have discontinued prescribing Nexgard monthly chewable flea & tick control tablets.

Dog owners love only having to give 4 chewable tablets a year for complete flea and tick prevention! Even better, Bravecto won’t wash off, cause a mess or smell like a topical product will. It gets even better, though: Bravecto is significantly cheaper to use than monthly Nexgard chewable tablets or monthly topical products!!

Bravecto kills 100% of newly arriving fleas within 24 hours for 12 weeks. Even better, Bravecto kills fleas so quickly that most flea-allergic dogs have little or no flea allergy dermatitis after a flea exposure. Bravecto starts killing fleas within 2 hours and kills 100% of fleas within 12 hours after treatment.

Bravecto kills 4 tick species: Ixodes scapularis (black-legged tick), Dermacentor variabilis (American dog tick), and Rhipicephalus sanguineus (brown dog tick) for 12 weeks, and Amblyomma americanum (lone star tick) for 8 weeks. Due to Bravecto’s rapid onset of action and speed of kill, ticks seldom have time to engorge or transmit disease.

Bravecto is available by veterinary prescription only, for dogs and puppies at least 6 months of age and 4.4 lbs weight.

Bravecto Chews 44.1 – 88.0 lbs, 2 pack
BRAVECTO 90-DAY CHEWABLE FLEA & TICK CONTROL TABLETS

Bravecto is the FIRST oral chew to deliver flea and tick protection for up to 12 full weeks. It provides consistent, broad-spectrum, and long-lasting efficacy against both fleas and ticks. Bravecto is also amazingly safe: the FDA has approved Bravecto for use in breeding, pregnant and nursing dogs.

Because of Bravecto’s proven 90-day efficacy and safety, the Doctors of Windmill Animal Hospital have discontinued prescribing Nexgard monthly chewable flea & tick control tablets.

Dog owners love only having to give 4 chewable tablets a year for complete flea and tick prevention! Even better, Bravecto won’t wash off, cause a mess or smell like a topical product will. It gets even better, though: Bravecto is significantly cheaper to use than monthly Nexgard chewable tablets or monthly topical products!!

Bravecto kills 100% of newly arriving fleas within 24 hours for 12 weeks. Even better, Bravecto kills fleas so quickly that most flea-allergic dogs have little or no flea allergy dermatitis after a flea exposure. Bravecto starts killing fleas within 2 hours and kills 100% of fleas within 12 hours after treatment.

Bravecto kills 4 tick species: Ixodes scapularis (black-legged tick), Dermacentor variabilis (American dog tick), and Rhipicephalus sanguineus (brown dog tick) for 12 weeks, and Amblyomma americanum (lone star tick) for 8 weeks. Due to Bravecto’s rapid onset of action and speed of kill, ticks seldom have time to engorge or transmit disease.

Bravecto is available by veterinary prescription only, for dogs and puppies at least 6 months of age and 4.4 lbs weight.

Bravecto Chews 88.1 – 123 lb, 2 pack
BRAVECTO 90-DAY CHEWABLE FLEA & TICK CONTROL TABLETS

Bravecto is the FIRST oral chew to deliver flea and tick protection for up to 12 full weeks. It provides consistent, broad-spectrum, and long-lasting efficacy against both fleas and ticks. Bravecto is also amazingly safe: the FDA has approved Bravecto for use in breeding, pregnant and nursing dogs.

Because of Bravecto’s proven 90-day efficacy and safety, the Doctors of Windmill Animal Hospital have discontinued prescribing Nexgard monthly chewable flea & tick control tablets.

Dog owners love only having to give 4 chewable tablets a year for complete flea and tick prevention! Even better, Bravecto won’t wash off, cause a mess or smell like a topical product will. It gets even better, though: Bravecto is significantly cheaper to use than monthly Nexgard chewable tablets or monthly topical products!!

Bravecto kills 100% of newly arriving fleas within 24 hours for 12 weeks. Even better, Bravecto kills fleas so quickly that most flea-allergic dogs have little or no flea allergy dermatitis after a flea exposure. Bravecto starts killing fleas within 2 hours and kills 100% of fleas within 12 hours after treatment.

Bravecto kills 4 tick species: Ixodes scapularis (black-legged tick), Dermacentor variabilis (American dog tick), and Rhipicephalus sanguineus (brown dog tick) for 12 weeks, and Amblyomma americanum (lone star tick) for 8 weeks. Due to Bravecto’s rapid onset of action and speed of kill, ticks seldom have time to engorge or transmit disease.

Bravecto is available by veterinary prescription only, for dogs and puppies at least 6 months of age and 4.4 lbs weight.

Bravecto Chews 9.9 – 22.0 lbs, 2 pack
BRAVECTO 90-DAY CHEWABLE FLEA & TICK CONTROL TABLETS

Bravecto is the FIRST oral chew to deliver flea and tick protection for up to 12 full weeks. It provides consistent, broad-spectrum, and long-lasting efficacy against both fleas and ticks. Bravecto is also amazingly safe: the FDA has approved Bravecto for use in breeding, pregnant and nursing dogs.

Because of Bravecto’s proven 90-day efficacy and safety, the Doctors of Windmill Animal Hospital have discontinued prescribing Nexgard monthly chewable flea & tick control tablets.

Dog owners love only having to give 4 chewable tablets a year for complete flea and tick prevention! Even better, Bravecto won’t wash off, cause a mess or smell like a topical product will. It gets even better, though: Bravecto is significantly cheaper to use than monthly Nexgard chewable tablets or monthly topical products!!

Bravecto kills 100% of newly arriving fleas within 24 hours for 12 weeks. Even better, Bravecto kills fleas so quickly that most flea-allergic dogs have little or no flea allergy dermatitis after a flea exposure. Bravecto starts killing fleas within 2 hours and kills 100% of fleas within 12 hours after treatment.

Bravecto kills 4 tick species: Ixodes scapularis (black-legged tick), Dermacentor variabilis (American dog tick), and Rhipicephalus sanguineus (brown dog tick) for 12 weeks, and Amblyomma americanum (lone star tick) for 8 weeks. Due to Bravecto’s rapid onset of action and speed of kill, ticks seldom have time to engorge or transmit disease.

Bravecto is available by veterinary prescription only, for dogs and puppies at least 6 months of age and 4.4 lbs weight.

Bravecto for cats 13.8-27.5 lbs sgl dose
BRAVECTO 90-DAY CHEWABLE FLEA & TICK CONTROL TABLETS

Bravecto is the FIRST oral chew to deliver flea and tick protection for up to 12 full weeks. It provides consistent, broad-spectrum, and long-lasting efficacy against both fleas and ticks. Bravecto is also amazingly safe: the FDA has approved Bravecto for use in breeding, pregnant and nursing dogs.

Because of Bravecto’s proven 90-day efficacy and safety, the Doctors of Windmill Animal Hospital have discontinued prescribing Nexgard monthly chewable flea & tick control tablets.

Dog owners love only having to give 4 chewable tablets a year for complete flea and tick prevention! Even better, Bravecto won’t wash off, cause a mess or smell like a topical product will. It gets even better, though: Bravecto is significantly cheaper to use than monthly Nexgard chewable tablets or monthly topical products!!

Bravecto kills 100% of newly arriving fleas within 24 hours for 12 weeks. Even better, Bravecto kills fleas so quickly that most flea-allergic dogs have little or no flea allergy dermatitis after a flea exposure. Bravecto starts killing fleas within 2 hours and kills 100% of fleas within 12 hours after treatment.

Bravecto kills 4 tick species: Ixodes scapularis (black-legged tick), Dermacentor variabilis (American dog tick), and Rhipicephalus sanguineus (brown dog tick) for 12 weeks, and Amblyomma americanum (lone star tick) for 8 weeks. Due to Bravecto’s rapid onset of action and speed of kill, ticks seldom have time to engorge or transmit disease.

Bravecto is available by veterinary prescription only, for dogs and puppies at least 6 months of age and 4.4 lbs weight.

Bravecto for cats 2.6-6.2 lbs, sgl dose
BRAVECTO 90-DAY CHEWABLE FLEA & TICK CONTROL TABLETS

Bravecto is the FIRST oral chew to deliver flea and tick protection for up to 12 full weeks. It provides consistent, broad-spectrum, and long-lasting efficacy against both fleas and ticks. Bravecto is also amazingly safe: the FDA has approved Bravecto for use in breeding, pregnant and nursing dogs.

Because of Bravecto’s proven 90-day efficacy and safety, the Doctors of Windmill Animal Hospital have discontinued prescribing Nexgard monthly chewable flea & tick control tablets.

Dog owners love only having to give 4 chewable tablets a year for complete flea and tick prevention! Even better, Bravecto won’t wash off, cause a mess or smell like a topical product will. It gets even better, though: Bravecto is significantly cheaper to use than monthly Nexgard chewable tablets or monthly topical products!!

Bravecto kills 100% of newly arriving fleas within 24 hours for 12 weeks. Even better, Bravecto kills fleas so quickly that most flea-allergic dogs have little or no flea allergy dermatitis after a flea exposure. Bravecto starts killing fleas within 2 hours and kills 100% of fleas within 12 hours after treatment.

Bravecto kills 4 tick species: Ixodes scapularis (black-legged tick), Dermacentor variabilis (American dog tick), and Rhipicephalus sanguineus (brown dog tick) for 12 weeks, and Amblyomma americanum (lone star tick) for 8 weeks. Due to Bravecto’s rapid onset of action and speed of kill, ticks seldom have time to engorge or transmit disease.

Bravecto is available by veterinary prescription only, for dogs and puppies at least 6 months of age and 4.4 lbs weight.

Bravecto for cats 6.2-13.8 lbs, sgl dose
BRAVECTO 90-DAY CHEWABLE FLEA & TICK CONTROL TABLETS

Bravecto is the FIRST oral chew to deliver flea and tick protection for up to 12 full weeks. It provides consistent, broad-spectrum, and long-lasting efficacy against both fleas and ticks. Bravecto is also amazingly safe: the FDA has approved Bravecto for use in breeding, pregnant and nursing dogs.

Because of Bravecto’s proven 90-day efficacy and safety, the Doctors of Windmill Animal Hospital have discontinued prescribing Nexgard monthly chewable flea & tick control tablets.

Dog owners love only having to give 4 chewable tablets a year for complete flea and tick prevention! Even better, Bravecto won’t wash off, cause a mess or smell like a topical product will. It gets even better, though: Bravecto is significantly cheaper to use than monthly Nexgard chewable tablets or monthly topical products!!

Bravecto kills 100% of newly arriving fleas within 24 hours for 12 weeks. Even better, Bravecto kills fleas so quickly that most flea-allergic dogs have little or no flea allergy dermatitis after a flea exposure. Bravecto starts killing fleas within 2 hours and kills 100% of fleas within 12 hours after treatment.

Bravecto kills 4 tick species: Ixodes scapularis (black-legged tick), Dermacentor variabilis (American dog tick), and Rhipicephalus sanguineus (brown dog tick) for 12 weeks, and Amblyomma americanum (lone star tick) for 8 weeks. Due to Bravecto’s rapid onset of action and speed of kill, ticks seldom have time to engorge or transmit disease.

Bravecto is available by veterinary prescription only, for dogs and puppies at least 6 months of age and 4.4 lbs weight.

CANINE 3-YEAR DHP-P-C BOOSTER
Our records indicate it’s time for your dog or puppy to receive a DHP-Parvo-Corona vaccine. What’s this? Alphabet soup? Actually, it’s veterinary “shorthand” for a very important vaccine for dogs and puppies:

· “D” stands for Canine Distemper Virus, a highly contagious and commonly fatal infection that causes pneumonia, gastroenteritis, and encephalitis/seizures. Distemper used to wipe out entire kennels and litters of puppies. Now, thanks to good vaccines, it is a disease of unowned or neglected dogs only.

· “H” stands for Infectious Canine Hepatitis, a contagious and commonly fatal infection that causes acute liver failure and corneal lesions. Again, thanks to good vaccines, ICH is very uncommon.

· “P” stands for Parainfluenza virus, one of the common components of Infectious Tracheobronchitis or “Kennel Cough.” All dogs are at risk of exposure to Kennel Cough if they are boarded, groomed, go to the park, go for walks, or live where there are neighboring dogs.

· “Parvo” stands for Canine Parvovirus Enteritis, a highly contagious and usually fatal viral infection of the digestive tract. It causes severe vomiting and foul, bloody diarrhea. Parvo first appeared in 1978; it was a dreaded scourge of all dog owners and breeders until reliable vaccines were developed in the late 1980′s.

· “C” stands for Canine Coronavirus Enteritis, a highly contagious & debilitating viral infection of the digestive tract. Corona doesn’t normally cause death, but it does cause 3 weeks of uncontrollable diarrhea. It debilitates the dog, leaving the dog wide open for other infections, such as Parvo.

Wow! That one vaccine packs a powerful punch!

You may read on the Internet about the debate on how often to vaccinate your adult dog for DHLP-Parvo-Corona. The debate ranges from vaccinating for everything every year to not vaccinating at all after a certain age. The doctors of Windmill Animal Hospital believe neither extreme is correct; vaccinating every year is simply not necessary, and not vaccinating at all can be very dangerous. Pet owners in Norway quit vaccinating their adult dogs for DHP-Parvo-Corona in the mid to late 1990′s; consequently, the dogs of Norway had to endure a pandemic of Canine Distemper recently.

The doctors of Windmill Animal Hospital recommend administering the DHLP-Parvo-Corona vaccination with the following schedule:

· at 6, 10 and 14 weeks of age for all puppies
· repeat 1 year later
· repeat every three years after that

High-risk dogs (show dogs, search & rescue dogs, obedience dogs, agility dogs) may need vaccinating annually while competing.

CANINE ANNUAL LYME BOOSTER
Our records indicate it’s time for your dog or puppy to receive its Lyme Disease vaccine. Lyme disease is a clinical disorder caused by a microscopic organism, the spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, and is spread by ticks. Fleas & mosquitoes have also been implicated in the spread of Lyme disease. The ticks normally feed on small mammals, especially mice. Ticks then feed on dogs or people, and carry the bacteria to their victims. The deer tick is the most common tick involved in spreading the disease, although other ticks can pass it along, too. Ticks capable of spreading Lyme disease are most commonly found in the eastern United States, the upper Midwest, Texas and the Pacific Northwest. Lyme disease can affect different organs and body systems. The disease is named because of the initial discovery in human beings that occurred in 1975 in Lyme, Connecticut. Abilene and the general Big Country is a small hot-spot of Lyme disease, as is the Dallas-Fort Worth area, due to the high numbers of ticks in the area, and dogs coming into the area from all over the country.

Lyme disease causes a variety of symptoms in affected dogs, and can be difficult to diagnose. The signs of Lyme disease include recurrent lameness, nonspecific pain, joint swelling, anorexia, unexplained fever, lethargy, depression, and enlarged lymph nodes. If untreated, Lyme disease can cause permanent joint pain and lameness.

High-risk dogs (hunting dogs, herding dogs, ranch dogs, search & rescue dogs, dogs who go camping, etc) as well as “city” dogs who have endured a tick problem should all be vaccinated for Lyme disease.

The doctors of Windmill Animal Hospital recommend administering the Lyme Disease vaccination with the following schedule:

· 14 weeks, 18 weeks of age for all puppies with risk of exposure to ticks
· booster within 1 year
· annually thereafter for all adult dogs with risk of exposure to ticks

CANINE INFLUENZA VACCINE, 1ST
Canine Influenza is a highly contagious viral disease of dogs that causes very similar symptoms that human ‘flu causes in humans: fever, malaise, coughing, nasal discharge. When a dog has an uncomplicated case of Canine Flu, the course of disease is 7-10 days, and chances of survival are excellent. However, if a dog is exposed to other respiratory diseases at the same time as a Flu infection, especially Canine Distemper and/or Kennel Cough, the mix of the multiple diseases is much more serious, with a high rate of mortality. Many dogs with a mix of Canine Flu and other respiratory infections end up with a hemorrhagic pneumonia and die within 24 hours.

The Canine Influenza vaccine is effective at preventing Canine Flu; it is given as an initial 2-shot series, then boostered annually. We highly recommend it for dogs with significant risk factors: a “snub-nose” anatomy (snub-nose breeds are very susceptible to respiratory infections, have a higher mortality rate, and have a harder time clearing the disease), heart and/or pulmonary disease (such as dogs with congestive heart failure, a history of heartworm infestation, etc), suppressed immune systems (such as after chemo therapy), and competition dogs (show dogs, performance dogs, search & rescue dogs, etc).

CANINE INFLUENZA VACCINE, 2ND
Canine Influenza is a highly contagious viral disease of dogs that causes very similar symptoms that human ‘flu causes in humans: fever, malaise, coughing, nasal discharge. When a dog has an uncomplicated case of Canine Flu, the course of disease is 7-10 days, and chances of survival are excellent. However, if a dog is exposed to other respiratory diseases at the same time as a Flu infection, especially Canine Distemper and/or Kennel Cough, the mix of the multiple diseases is much more serious, with a high rate of mortality. Many dogs with a mix of Canine Flu and other respiratory infections end up with a hemorrhagic pneumonia and die within 24 hours.

The Canine Influenza vaccine is effective at preventing Canine Flu; it is given as an initial 2-shot series, then boostered annually. We highly recommend it for dogs with significant risk factors: a “snub-nose” anatomy (snub-nose breeds are very susceptible to respiratory infections, have a higher mortality rate, and have a harder time clearing the disease), heart and/or pulmonary disease (such as dogs with congestive heart failure, a history of heartworm infestation, etc), suppressed immune systems (such as after chemo therapy), and competition dogs (show dogs, performance dogs, search & rescue dogs, etc).

CANINE INFLUENZA VACCINE-ANNUAL
Canine Influenza is a highly contagious viral disease of dogs that causes very similar symptoms that human ‘flu causes in humans: fever, malaise, coughing, nasal discharge. When a dog has an uncomplicated case of Canine Flu, the course of disease is 7-10 days, and chances of survival are excellent. However, if a dog is exposed to other respiratory diseases at the same time as a Flu infection, especially Canine Distemper and/or Kennel Cough, the mix of the multiple diseases is much more serious, with a high rate of mortality. Many dogs with a mix of Canine Flu and other respiratory infections end up with a hemorrhagic pneumonia and die within 24 hours.

The Canine Influenza vaccine is effective at preventing Canine Flu; it is given as an initial 2-shot series, then boostered annually. We highly recommend it for dogs with significant risk factors: a “snub-nose” anatomy (snub-nose breeds are very susceptible to respiratory infections, have a higher mortality rate, and have a harder time clearing the disease), heart and/or pulmonary disease (such as dogs with congestive heart failure, a history of heartworm infestation, etc), suppressed immune systems (such as after chemo therapy), and competition dogs (show dogs, performance dogs, search & rescue dogs, etc).

CANINE LEPTO 4-WAY VACCINE, 1ST
Leptospirosis is a zoonotic disease, meaning that it occurs in humans as well as animals. The infective agent is a one-celled organism called a “leptospire;” there are several dozen known strains, or serovars. The leptospires are shed in the body fluids of infected animals, especially the urine. Primary carriers of Leptospirosis in the wild are raccoons, rodents, feral hogs, cattle and goats. The disease is transmitted by contact with the infected urine.

Infected dogs develop a fever, lethargy, and intense thirst; as the disease progresses, the kidneys start failing. Commonly, the liver will fail also. With intensive care, many dogs can be saved, but commonly have permanent kidney damage. The length of time an infected dog will shed leptospires in its urine can be several weeks.

Dogs infected with Leptospirosis present a very real health threat to their human family members, due to the human exposure to infectious body fluids and urine. Accordingly, it is critically important, not only for the health of our dogs, but for the protection of the health of our families, to keep our dogs immunized against this commonly deadly disease.

Any dog can be exposed to Leptospirosis that goes outside, as most urban and suburban backyards have their fare share of raccoons, rodents, and other critters coming through at night. Additional risk factors for urban and suburban dogs include backyards with outdoor feeding stations for cats (as raccoons and rodents come in to the yard to eat the cat food, also), and bird feeders (as raccoons and rodents snack under/around bird feeders also).

Lifestyles also introduce risk factors: working ranch dogs, dogs who go camping/fishing, and hunting dogs also are at high risk of being exposed to Leptospirosis in the course of their working and hunting activities.

The Leptospirosis bacterin is a 4-way vaccine, meaning it will help create antibodies to the 4 most commonly encountered Leptospirosis serovars. Consisting of an initial 2-vaccine series, with annual boosters, Leptospirosis vaccines are commonly started with the second well-puppy visit.

CANINE LEPTO 4-WAY VACCINE, 2ND
Leptospirosis is a zoonotic disease, meaning that it occurs in humans as well as animals. The infective agent is a one-celled organism called a “leptospire;” there are several dozen known strains, or serovars. The leptospires are shed in the body fluids of infected animals, especially the urine. Primary carriers of Leptospirosis in the wild are raccoons, rodents, feral hogs, cattle and goats. The disease is transmitted by contact with the infected urine.

Infected dogs develop a fever, lethargy, and intense thirst; as the disease progresses, the kidneys start failing. Commonly, the liver will fail also. With intensive care, many dogs can be saved, but commonly have permanent kidney damage. The length of time an infected dog will shed leptospires in its urine can be several weeks.

Dogs infected with Leptospirosis present a very real health threat to their human family members, due to the human exposure to infectious body fluids and urine. Accordingly, it is critically important, not only for the health of our dogs, but for the protection of the health of our families, to keep our dogs immunized against this commonly deadly disease.

Any dog can be exposed to Leptospirosis that goes outside, as most urban and suburban backyards have their fare share of raccoons, rodents, and other critters coming through at night. Additional risk factors for urban and suburban dogs include backyards with outdoor feeding stations for cats (as raccoons and rodents come in to the yard to eat the cat food, also), and bird feeders (as raccoons and rodents snack under/around bird feeders also).

Lifestyles also introduce risk factors: working ranch dogs, dogs who go camping/fishing, and hunting dogs also are at high risk of being exposed to Leptospirosis in the course of their working and hunting activities.

The Leptospirosis bacterin is a 4-way vaccine, meaning it will help create antibodies to the 4 most commonly encountered Leptospirosis serovars. Consisting of an initial 2-vaccine series, with annual boosters, Leptospirosis vaccines are commonly started with the second well-puppy visit.

CANINE LEPTO ANNUAL BOOSTER
Leptospirosis is a zoonotic disease, meaning that it occurs in humans as well as animals. The infective agent is a one-celled organism called a “leptospire;” there are several dozen known strains, or serovars. The leptospires are shed in the body fluids of infected animals, especially the urine. Primary carriers of Leptospirosis in the wild are raccoons, rodents, feral hogs, cattle and goats. The disease is transmitted by contact with the infected urine.

Infected dogs develop a fever, lethargy, and intense thirst; as the disease progresses, the kidneys start failing. Commonly, the liver will fail also. With intensive care, many dogs can be saved, but commonly have permanent kidney damage. The length of time an infected dog will shed leptospires in its urine can be several weeks.

Dogs infected with Leptospirosis present a very real health threat to their human family members, due to the human exposure to infectious body fluids and urine. Accordingly, it is critically important, not only for the health of our dogs, but for the protection of the health of our families, to keep our dogs immunized against this commonly deadly disease.

Any dog can be exposed to Leptospirosis that goes outside, as most urban and suburban backyards have their fare share of raccoons, rodents, and other critters coming through at night. Additional risk factors for urban and suburban dogs include backyards with outdoor feeding stations for cats (as raccoons and rodents come in to the yard to eat the cat food, also), and bird feeders (as raccoons and rodents snack under/around bird feeders also).

Lifestyles also introduce risk factors: working ranch dogs, dogs who go camping/fishing, and hunting dogs also are at high risk of being exposed to Leptospirosis in the course of their working and hunting activities.

The Leptospirosis bacterin is a 4-way vaccine, meaning it will help create antibodies to the 4 most commonly encountered Leptospirosis serovars. Consisting of an initial 2-vaccine series, with annual boosters, Leptospirosis vaccines are commonly started with the second well-puppy visit.

CBC (COMPLETE BLOOD COUNT) IN HOUSE
Our records show your pet is due for some diagnostic laboratory blood tests. These tests fall into 4 categories:

  1. Your pet’s previous lab work (such as a pre-anesthetic profile associated with an routine surgical procedure, or bloodwork associated with an illness your pet endured, or a previous urinary tract infection), revealed a POSSIBLE problem. You are being sent this reminder to alert you that it’s time to recheck your pet’s lab work, to verify that there IS or IS NOT a concern with your pet’s internal health. Abnormalities in lab work that commonly show up that need to be double-checked include elevated kidney values, elevated liver values, elevated white blood cell counts, depressed platelet counts, urinary tract infections/crystals, etc. Rechecking your pet’s lab work will indicate whether the abnormality has resolved, or will need to be managed in future.
  2. Your pet has been diagnosed with a chronic medical ailment, such as diabetes or compromised kidney function, and the values need a routine recheck. Routine rechecks, usually twice a year, are critical to proper management of your pet’s chronic health problem, to insure proper management and optimum comfort and longevity for your pet.
  3. Your pet is on long-term anticonvulsant medications, such as phenobarbital or potassium bromide, or is on hormonal supplementation, such as for low thyroid, or is on long-term Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammtant drugs for chronic pain. Serum anticonvulsant medication levels MUST be checked at least annually, as well as a Complete Blood Count and a General Chemistry Panel. If the levels get too low, therefore, ineffective, your pet will start seizing again. If the levels get too high, the anticonvulsant drug becomes dangerous, toxic, and could induce the very seizures it is designed to prevent. The only way to know if the dose of anticonvulsant is correct is to check the serum levels. The only way to make sure the anticonvulsant isn’t causing problems with your pet’s internal organ health is to do blood work. Thyroid and other hormone supplementation must also be checked at least annually–if the dose is too low, your pet will receive no benefit and you will waste your time and money; if the dose is too high, your pet’s health could be seriously harmed. NonSteroidal Anti-Inflammatant Drugs (known as NSAIDs) do a very good job of relieving pain, but they ALL can cause digestive upset, they ALL put stress on the liver, and they ALL lower blood pressure to the kidneys. Therefore, pets on long-term NSAIDs MUST have their liver & kidney health checked at least every 6 months, as well as a complete blod count to verify no chronic blood loss through GIT inflammation.
  4. Your pet is 8 years of age or older, and needs routine blood screens to verify normal internal organ health. All senior pets (8 years +), and, especially geriatric pets (10 years +), should have their internal health assessed via blood work at least annually. The earlier a developing problem is detected, the easier and less expensive it is to manage.

Windmill Animal Hospital has extensive in-house lab test capability; we are able to process most of our patients’ lab testing needs right here at our hospital. This means fast turn-around, and accurate results for you, our client!

Please call or email us today, to discuss your pet’s lab work needs, and get an appointment scheduled.

CITY OF ABILENE PET LICENSE FEE
The City of Abilene, by City Ordinance, requires all dogs and cats living in the Abilene city limits to be rabies vaccinated and to be licensed. The annual licensing fee is $8.00.

No worries. The staff at WIndmill Animal Hospital will handle all the paperwork for you, and issue your Abilene license tag. Call today for an appointment at 698-VETS (8387)

DENTAL EXAMINATION
Our records indicate that it’s time to check your pet’s oral health. This is very important for puppies with under-shot or over-shot bites, as interference between upper and lower teeth can cause significant malocclusions. With most of these situations, strategic and timely removal of minor teeth (such as incisors or minor premolars) will allow the fangs and other major teeth to “fit” comfortably and correctly, thereby avoiding a lifetime of discomfort and disfigurement for your pet.
DEWCLAW REMOVAL: ADULT, FRONT ONLY
Your pet has been diagnosed by one of the doctors at Windmill Animal Hospital as having a medical concern that needs to be resolved via surgery, or an elective surgery that you’ve discussed with one of our doctors that needs to be scheduled.. The most common reasons for a pet to need surgery, excluding spay/neuter, is to remove a lump or bump, surgical correction of an orthopedic problem such as a ruptured Cranial Cruciate Ligament, or to repair a hernia. Elective procedures include dewclaw removal, stenotic nares correction, and other procedures that will help your pet’s comfort and longevity. There are many other conditions that also require surgery to resolve. This reminder was sent to you to help you remember to get your pet scheduled!
DHP-PARVO-CORONA 1ST BOOSTER
Our records indicate it’s time for your dog or puppy to receive a DHP-Parvo-Corona vaccine. What’s this? Alphabet soup? Actually, it’s veterinary “shorthand” for a very important vaccine for dogs and puppies:

· “D” stands for Canine Distemper Virus, a highly contagious and commonly fatal infection that causes pneumonia, gastroenteritis, and encephalitis/seizures. Distemper used to wipe out entire kennels and litters of puppies. Now, thanks to good vaccines, it is a disease of unowned or neglected dogs only.

· “H” stands for Infectious Canine Hepatitis, a contagious and commonly fatal infection that causes acute liver failure and corneal lesions. Again, thanks to good vaccines, ICH is very uncommon.

· “P” stands for Parainfluenza virus, one of the common components of Infectious Tracheobronchitis or “Kennel Cough.” All dogs are at risk of exposure to Kennel Cough if they are boarded, groomed, go to the park, go for walks, or live where there are neighboring dogs.

· “Parvo” stands for Canine Parvovirus Enteritis, a highly contagious and usually fatal viral infection of the digestive tract. It causes severe vomiting and foul, bloody diarrhea. Parvo first appeared in 1978; it was a dreaded scourge of all dog owners and breeders until reliable vaccines were developed in the late 1980′s.

· “C” stands for Canine Coronavirus Enteritis, a highly contagious & debilitating viral infection of the digestive tract. Corona doesn’t normally cause death, but it does cause 3 weeks of uncontrollable diarrhea. It debilitates the dog, leaving the dog wide open for other infections, such as Parvo.

Wow! That one vaccine packs a powerful punch!

You may read on the Internet about the debate on how often to vaccinate your adult dog for DHLP-Parvo-Corona. The debate ranges from vaccinating for everything every year to not vaccinating at all after a certain age. The doctors of Windmill Animal Hospital believe neither extreme is correct; vaccinating every year is simply not necessary, and not vaccinating at all can be very dangerous. Pet owners in Norway quit vaccinating their adult dogs for DHP-Parvo-Corona in the mid to late 1990′s; consequently, the dogs of Norway had to endure a pandemic of Canine Distemper recently.

The doctors of Windmill Animal Hospital recommend administering the DHLP-Parvo-Corona vaccination with the following schedule:

· at 6, 10 and 14 weeks of age for all puppies
· repeat 1 year later
· repeat every three years after that

High-risk dogs (show dogs, search & rescue dogs, obedience dogs, agility dogs) may need vaccinating annually while competing.

DHP-PARVO-CORONA 2ND BOOSTER
Our records indicate it’s time for your dog or puppy to receive a DHP-Parvo-Corona vaccine. What’s this? Alphabet soup? Actually, it’s veterinary “shorthand” for a very important vaccine for dogs and puppies:

· “D” stands for Canine Distemper Virus, a highly contagious and commonly fatal infection that causes pneumonia, gastroenteritis, and encephalitis/seizures. Distemper used to wipe out entire kennels and litters of puppies. Now, thanks to good vaccines, it is a disease of unowned or neglected dogs only.

· “H” stands for Infectious Canine Hepatitis, a contagious and commonly fatal infection that causes acute liver failure and corneal lesions. Again, thanks to good vaccines, ICH is very uncommon.

· “P” stands for Parainfluenza virus, one of the common components of Infectious Tracheobronchitis or “Kennel Cough.” All dogs are at risk of exposure to Kennel Cough if they are boarded, groomed, go to the park, go for walks, or live where there are neighboring dogs.

· “Parvo” stands for Canine Parvovirus Enteritis, a highly contagious and usually fatal viral infection of the digestive tract. It causes severe vomiting and foul, bloody diarrhea. Parvo first appeared in 1978; it was a dreaded scourge of all dog owners and breeders until reliable vaccines were developed in the late 1980′s.

· “C” stands for Canine Coronavirus Enteritis, a highly contagious & debilitating viral infection of the digestive tract. Corona doesn’t normally cause death, but it does cause 3 weeks of uncontrollable diarrhea. It debilitates the dog, leaving the dog wide open for other infections, such as Parvo.

Wow! That one vaccine packs a powerful punch!

You may read on the Internet about the debate on how often to vaccinate your adult dog for DHLP-Parvo-Corona. The debate ranges from vaccinating for everything every year to not vaccinating at all after a certain age. The doctors of Windmill Animal Hospital believe neither extreme is correct; vaccinating every year is simply not necessary, and not vaccinating at all can be very dangerous. Pet owners in Norway quit vaccinating their adult dogs for DHP-Parvo-Corona in the mid to late 1990′s; consequently, the dogs of Norway had to endure a pandemic of Canine Distemper recently.

The doctors of Windmill Animal Hospital recommend administering the DHLP-Parvo-Corona vaccination with the following schedule:

· at 6, 10 and 14 weeks of age for all puppies
· repeat 1 year later
· repeat every three years after that

High-risk dogs (show dogs, search & rescue dogs, obedience dogs, agility dogs) may need vaccinating annually while competing.

DHP-PARVO-CORONA 3RD BOOSTER
Our records indicate it’s time for your dog or puppy to receive a DHP-Parvo-Corona vaccine. What’s this? Alphabet soup? Actually, it’s veterinary “shorthand” for a very important vaccine for dogs and puppies:

· “D” stands for Canine Distemper Virus, a highly contagious and commonly fatal infection that causes pneumonia, gastroenteritis, and encephalitis/seizures. Distemper used to wipe out entire kennels and litters of puppies. Now, thanks to good vaccines, it is a disease of unowned or neglected dogs only.

· “H” stands for Infectious Canine Hepatitis, a contagious and commonly fatal infection that causes acute liver failure and corneal lesions. Again, thanks to good vaccines, ICH is very uncommon.

· “P” stands for Parainfluenza virus, one of the common components of Infectious Tracheobronchitis or “Kennel Cough.” All dogs are at risk of exposure to Kennel Cough if they are boarded, groomed, go to the park, go for walks, or live where there are neighboring dogs.

· “Parvo” stands for Canine Parvovirus Enteritis, a highly contagious and usually fatal viral infection of the digestive tract. It causes severe vomiting and foul, bloody diarrhea. Parvo first appeared in 1978; it was a dreaded scourge of all dog owners and breeders until reliable vaccines were developed in the late 1980′s.

· “C” stands for Canine Coronavirus Enteritis, a highly contagious & debilitating viral infection of the digestive tract. Corona doesn’t normally cause death, but it does cause 3 weeks of uncontrollable diarrhea. It debilitates the dog, leaving the dog wide open for other infections, such as Parvo.

Wow! That one vaccine packs a powerful punch!

You may read on the Internet about the debate on how often to vaccinate your adult dog for DHLP-Parvo-Corona. The debate ranges from vaccinating for everything every year to not vaccinating at all after a certain age. The doctors of Windmill Animal Hospital believe neither extreme is correct; vaccinating every year is simply not necessary, and not vaccinating at all can be very dangerous. Pet owners in Norway quit vaccinating their adult dogs for DHP-Parvo-Corona in the mid to late 1990′s; consequently, the dogs of Norway had to endure a pandemic of Canine Distemper recently.

The doctors of Windmill Animal Hospital recommend administering the DHLP-Parvo-Corona vaccination with the following schedule:

· at 6, 10 and 14 weeks of age for all puppies
· repeat 1 year later
· repeat every three years after that

High-risk dogs (show dogs, search & rescue dogs, obedience dogs, agility dogs) may need vaccinating annually while competing.

DHP-PARVO-CORONA BOOSTER
Our records indicate it’s time for your dog or puppy to receive a DHP-Parvo-Corona vaccine. What’s this? Alphabet soup? Actually, it’s veterinary “shorthand” for a very important vaccine for dogs and puppies:

· “D” stands for Canine Distemper Virus, a highly contagious and commonly fatal infection that causes pneumonia, gastroenteritis, and encephalitis/seizures. Distemper used to wipe out entire kennels and litters of puppies. Now, thanks to good vaccines, it is a disease of unowned or neglected dogs only.

· “H” stands for Infectious Canine Hepatitis, a contagious and commonly fatal infection that causes acute liver failure and corneal lesions. Again, thanks to good vaccines, ICH is very uncommon.

· “P” stands for Parainfluenza virus, one of the common components of Infectious Tracheobronchitis or “Kennel Cough.” All dogs are at risk of exposure to Kennel Cough if they are boarded, groomed, go to the park, go for walks, or live where there are neighboring dogs.

· “Parvo” stands for Canine Parvovirus Enteritis, a highly contagious and usually fatal viral infection of the digestive tract. It causes severe vomiting and foul, bloody diarrhea. Parvo first appeared in 1978; it was a dreaded scourge of all dog owners and breeders until reliable vaccines were developed in the late 1980′s.

· “C” stands for Canine Coronavirus Enteritis, a highly contagious & debilitating viral infection of the digestive tract. Corona doesn’t normally cause death, but it does cause 3 weeks of uncontrollable diarrhea. It debilitates the dog, leaving the dog wide open for other infections, such as Parvo.

Wow! That one vaccine packs a powerful punch!

You may read on the Internet about the debate on how often to vaccinate your adult dog for DHLP-Parvo-Corona. The debate ranges from vaccinating for everything every year to not vaccinating at all after a certain age. The doctors of Windmill Animal Hospital believe neither extreme is correct; vaccinating every year is simply not necessary, and not vaccinating at all can be very dangerous. Pet owners in Norway quit vaccinating their adult dogs for DHP-Parvo-Corona in the mid to late 1990′s; consequently, the dogs of Norway had to endure a pandemic of Canine Distemper recently.

The doctors of Windmill Animal Hospital recommend administering the DHLP-Parvo-Corona vaccination with the following schedule:

· at 6, 10 and 14 weeks of age for all puppies
· repeat 1 year later
· repeat every three years after that

High-risk dogs (show dogs, search & rescue dogs, obedience dogs, agility dogs) may need vaccinating annually while competing.

EXAM: 1ST PUPPY/ KITTEN VISIT
A detailed report of this reminder is under construction. Please call us at 325-698-VETS (8387) for information about your pet’s reminder.
EXAMINATION: ANNUAL WELL-PET
Did you know that your pet being examined by his veterinarian once every year is the equivalent of us seeing our regular doctor once every 5 years? Dogs & cats age about 5 times faster than we do. This means their health problems develop at a much faster pace than ours. The most important part of your pet’s health care program is a thorough, detailed physical examination at least every 6 months.

It’s even more important for puppies and kittens to receive a thorough exam each time they come in for routine puppy or kitten vaccines. Your veterinarian will check for birth defects, developmental concerns, retained baby teeth, retained testicles, and hernias, among other concerns.–as well as help advise you on housetraining, leash training, feeding schedulesand all the millions of questions that come up when you’re raising a puppy or kitten.

Your pet’s physical examination includes:
· checking all vital signs
· examining the teeth/eyes/ears
· listening to the heart & lungs
· palpating the abdomen for any abnormalities
· searching for lumps, bumps, enlarged lymph nodes
· checking the skin and haircoat
· evaluating the pet for gait abnormalities and arthritis.

Another equally important part of your pet’s examination is the interview with you, his owner. You know your pet better than anyone else, so you are the best source of information for his usual daily habits:
· how much is he eating, drinking, urinating, defecating?
· Does he still play with his toys?
· Have you noticed an odor lately?
· How is his housetraining?
· Can he still go up the stairs/jump on the bed/jump in the car?

Our owner questionnaire has many more questions similar to the above list. Armed with this information, plus the information from the physical exam, the doctors of Windmill Animal Hospital can diagnose health problems in your pet early, which means a longer, more comfortable life for your pet, more peace of mind for you, and lower veterinary bills!

Recheck examinations are almost as important as the original exam. The recheck exam, and second interview with you, are how the doctors at Windmill Animal Hospital determine if the prescribed treatment plan is delivering the desired results, or if adjustments need to be made.

On a final note, you may be curious about why we must examine your pet before administering vaccinations. Texas law requires us to establish that your pet is healthy enough to receive vaccines before we administer them. If your pet is running a fever, has an infection, or is sick in any way, he will NOT be able to respond properly to the vaccination(s) by producing the desired antibodies. This means he will not be resistant to what he’s been vaccinated against, including Rabies. Would you want to risk this? We won’t!

EXAMINATION: RECHECK
Recheck examinations are almost as important as the original exam. The recheck exam, and second interview with you, are how the doctors at Windmill Animal Hospital determine if the prescribed treatment plan is delivering the desired results, or if adjustments need to be made.

Your pet’s recheck physical examination includes:
· checking all vital signs
· examining the teeth/eyes/ears
· listening to the heart & lungs
· palpating the abdomen for any abnormalities
· searching for lumps, bumps, enlarged lymph nodes
· checking the skin and haircoat
· evaluating the pet for gait abnormalities and arthritis

…and then comparing the findings with the original physical examination’s findings. Commonly, follow-up diagnostic tests will be needed, such a repeat urinalysis in case of a urinary tract infection, or a repeat ear cytology with otitis, to verify that the problem is resolving satisfactorily.

Another equally important part of your pet’s recheck examination is the interview with you, his owner. You know your pet better than anyone else, so you are the best source of information for his usual daily habits:
· is eating, drinking, urinating, defecating returning to normal?
· is he playing with his toys yet?
· Has the odor (from ears/mouth/skin/anal glands) reduced or gone away?
· Has his housetraining returned?
· Is he wanting or able to go up the stairs/jump on the bed/jump in the car now?

Our owner questionnaire has many more questions similar to the above list. Armed with this information, plus the information from the recheck physical exam, the doctors of Windmill Animal Hospital can stay on top of health problems in your pet, and make sure the treatment plan selected is delivering a satisfactory response, which means a longer, more comfortable life for your pet, more peace of mind for you, and lower veterinary bills!

EXAMINATION: SEMIANNUAL
Did you know that your pet being examined by his veterinarian once every year is the equivalent of us seeing our regular doctor once every 5 years? Dogs & cats age about 5 times faster than we do. This means their health problems develop at a much faster pace than ours. The most important part of your pet’s health care program is a thorough, detailed physical examination at least every 6 months.

It’s even more important for puppies and kittens to receive a thorough exam each time they come in for routine puppy or kitten vaccines. Your veterinarian will check for birth defects, developmental concerns, retained baby teeth, retained testicles, and hernias, among other concerns.–as well as help advise you on housetraining, leash training, feeding schedulesand all the millions of questions that come up when you’re raising a puppy or kitten.

Your pet’s physical examination includes:
· checking all vital signs
· examining the teeth/eyes/ears
· listening to the heart & lungs
· palpating the abdomen for any abnormalities
· searching for lumps, bumps, enlarged lymph nodes
· checking the skin and haircoat
· evaluating the pet for gait abnormalities and arthritis.

Another equally important part of your pet’s examination is the interview with you, his owner. You know your pet better than anyone else, so you are the best source of information for his usual daily habits:
· how much is he eating, drinking, urinating, defecating?
· Does he still play with his toys?
· Have you noticed an odor lately?
· How is his housetraining?
· Can he still go up the stairs/jump on the bed/jump in the car?

Our owner questionnaire has many more questions similar to the above list. Armed with this information, plus the information from the physical exam, the doctors of Windmill Animal Hospital can diagnose health problems in your pet early, which means a longer, more comfortable life for your pet, more peace of mind for you, and lower veterinary bills!

Recheck examinations are almost as important as the original exam. The recheck exam, and second interview with you, are how the doctors at Windmill Animal Hospital determine if the prescribed treatment plan is delivering the desired results, or if adjustments need to be made.

On a final note, you may be curious about why we must examine your pet before administering vaccinations. Texas law requires us to establish that your pet is healthy enough to receive vaccines before we administer them. If your pet is running a fever, has an infection, or is sick in any way, he will NOT be able to respond properly to the vaccination(s) by producing the desired antibodies. This means he will not be resistant to what he’s been vaccinated against, including Rabies. Would you want to risk this? We won’t!

EXAMINATION: W/NEEDED VACCINES
Did you know that your pet being examined by his veterinarian once every year is the equivalent of us seeing our regular doctor once every 5 years? Dogs & cats age about 5 times faster than we do. This means their health problems develop at a much faster pace than ours. The most important part of your pet’s health care program is a thorough, detailed physical examination at least every 6 months.

You may be curious about why we must examine your pet before administering vaccinations. Texas law requires us to establish that your pet is healthy enough to receive vaccines before we administer them. If your pet is running a fever, has an infection, or is sick in any way, he will NOT be able to respond properly to the vaccination(s) by producing the desired antibodies. This means he will not be resistant to what he’s been vaccinated against, including Rabies. Would you want to risk this? We won’t!

Your pet’s physical examination includes:
· checking all vital signs
· examining the teeth/eyes/ears
· listening to the heart & lungs
· palpating the abdomen for any abnormalities
· searching for lumps, bumps, enlarged lymph nodes
· checking the skin and haircoat
· evaluating the pet for gait abnormalities and arthritis.

Another equally important part of your pet’s examination is the interview with you, his owner. You know your pet better than anyone else, so you are the best source of information for his usual daily habits:
· how much is he eating, drinking, urinating, defecating?
· Does he still play with his toys?
· Have you noticed an odor lately?
· How is his housetraining?
· Can he still go up the stairs/jump on the bed/jump in the car?

Our owner questionnaire has many more questions similar to the above list. Armed with this information, plus the information from the physical exam, the doctors of Windmill Animal Hospital can diagnose health problems in your pet early, which means a longer, more comfortable life for your pet, more peace of mind for you, and lower veterinary bills!

EXAMINATION: PUPPY/KITTEN w/VAC
It’s very important for puppies and kittens to receive a thorough exam each time they come in for routine puppy or kitten vaccines. They should receive their first exam and initial vaccines between 6 and 8 weeks of age. Your veterinarian will check for birth defects, developmental concerns, retained baby teeth, retained testicles, and hernias, among other concerns.–as well as help advise you on housetraining, leash training, feeding schedules and all the millions of questions that come up when you’re raising a puppy or kitten.

Your puppy or kitten’s physical examination includes:
· checking all vital signs
· examining the teeth/eyes/ears
· listening to the heart & lungs
· palpating the abdomen for any abnormalities
· searching for lumps, bumps, enlarged lymph nodes
· checking the skin and haircoat
· evaluating the pet for gait abnormalities and arthritis.

Another equally important part of your pet’s examination is the interview with you, his owner. You know your pet better than anyone else, so you are the best source of information for his usual daily habits:
· how much is he eating, drinking, urinating, defecating?
· Does he play with his toys?
· Have you noticed an odor lately?
· How is his housetraining?
· Can he go up the stairs/jump on the bed/jump in the car?

Our owner questionnaire has many more questions similar to the above list. Armed with this information, plus the information from the physical exam, the doctors of Windmill Animal Hospital can diagnose developmental concerns and health problems in your pet early, which means a longer, more comfortable life for your pet, more peace of mind for you, and lower veterinary bills!

FECAL EXAMINATION (FLOATATION)
All pet owners, and most pets, ask the same question: what’s with this fascination with my dog/cat’s poop? Why do we have to keep checking it? What’s the big deal if we don’t check it? These are very valid questions, because acquiring a stool sample, whether via the owner picking up a specimen in the yard, or direct acquisition from the pet, is not a pleasant task for anyone!

Stool samples are the specimens we need to check your pet for intestinal parasites. The intestinal parasites we check for include:
· Roundworms
· Hookworms
· Whipworms
· Tapeworms
· Coccidia
· Giardia.

Your dog or cat can get exposed to these parasites in a variety of ways. If your dog or cat is allowed to roam, it could get exposed anywhere an infected pet has defecated (ever seen a dog or cat carefully checking out someone else’s poop?) In addition, your backyard could already be contaminated by a previous occupant’s pets. Another possibility is stray cats and wildlife crossing through your yard at night, and leaving their “calling cards.”

Puppies and kittens get intestinal worms from their mothers, through the placenta and the first milk. The first stool check should be done when the litter of puppies or kittens is about 4 weeks of age, and every 2-4 weeks after that until there are TWO negative stool checks in a row.

On the average, 21% of adult dogs and cats are infested with at least one of the above parasites at any one time. Intestinal parasites can cause upset stomach, vomiting, bloating, diarrhea, increased frequency & volume of defecation, flatulence, housetraining problems, coat/skin problems, and general misery for your pet. Indoor pets can be infested, too: we can track in contaminated mud on our shoes; Giardia sporocysts can literally blow in on the wind. No pet is completely safe from being exposed to intestinal parasites.

Unfortunately, 3 of the above parasites can infect people: Roundworms, Hookworms, and Giardia. Roundworm larvae cause seizures and blindness in children. Hookworm larvae cause cutaneous larval migrans, a skin disorder, and visceral larval migrans, a chronic form of gastroenteritis, in children and adults. Giardiasis is better known by some of its more popular names: Touristas, or Montezuma’s Revenge. People get exposed to these parasites when they live and play in the same premises as an infected pet–the yard gets seeded with worm eggs & larvae, as well as Giardia sporocysts. Fecal contamination on pets’ fur can contaminate human hands; failure to properly wash hands can mean direct ingestion of parasites.

Intestinal parasites are a big problem wherever pets live in a warm, humid environment. Since most of us have back yards with sprinklers, our pets live in the perfect environment to be exposed to (and expose us to) parasites. Because dogs and cats can be exposed to and acquire intestinal parasites at any time, we must routinely check their stools. Maintaining control of intestinal parasites in an ongoing battle.

The National Council on Parasitism and the American College of Veterinary Parasitologists recommends we check all dogs and cats for intestinal parasites twice yearly. They recommend we check puppies and kittens monthly until 6 months of age. In addition, because monthly oral heartworm preventativessuch as Interceptor and Sentinel for dogs, and Revolution for cats, help reduce the incidence of intestinal parasitism, all dogs and cats should be maintained year-round on these products.

FECAL FLOAT/SMEAR DUAL SERVICE
All pet owners, and most pets, ask the same question: what’s with this fascination with my dog/cat’s poop? Why do we have to keep checking it? What’s the big deal if we don’t check it? These are very valid questions, because acquiring a stool sample, whether via the owner picking up a specimen in the yard, or direct acquisition from the pet, is not a pleasant task for anyone!

Stool samples are the specimens we need to check your pet for intestinal parasites. The intestinal parasites we check for include:
· Roundworms
· Hookworms
· Whipworms
· Tapeworms
· Coccidia
· Giardia.

Your dog or cat can get exposed to these parasites in a variety of ways. If your dog or cat is allowed to roam, it could get exposed anywhere an infected pet has defecated (ever seen a dog or cat carefully checking out someone else’s poop?) In addition, your backyard could already be contaminated by a previous occupant’s pets. Another possibility is stray cats and wildlife crossing through your yard at night, and leaving their “calling cards.”

Puppies and kittens get intestinal worms from their mothers, through the placenta and the first milk. The first stool check should be done when the litter of puppies or kittens is about 4 weeks of age, and every 2-4 weeks after that until there are TWO negative stool checks in a row.

On the average, 21% of adult dogs and cats are infested with at least one of the above parasites at any one time. Intestinal parasites can cause upset stomach, vomiting, bloating, diarrhea, increased frequency & volume of defecation, flatulence, housetraining problems, coat/skin problems, and general misery for your pet. Indoor pets can be infested, too: we can track in contaminated mud on our shoes; Giardia sporocysts can literally blow in on the wind. No pet is completely safe from being exposed to intestinal parasites.

Unfortunately, 3 of the above parasites can infect people: Roundworms, Hookworms, and Giardia. Roundworm larvae cause seizures and blindness in children. Hookworm larvae cause cutaneous larval migrans, a skin disorder, and visceral larval migrans, a chronic form of gastroenteritis, in children and adults. Giardiasis is better known by some of its more popular names: Touristas, or Montezuma’s Revenge. People get exposed to these parasites when they live and play in the same premises as an infected pet–the yard gets seeded with worm eggs & larvae, as well as Giardia sporocysts. Fecal contamination on pets’ fur can contaminate human hands; failure to properly wash hands can mean direct ingestion of parasites.

Intestinal parasites are a big problem wherever pets live in a warm, humid environment. Since most of us have back yards with sprinklers, our pets live in the perfect environment to be exposed to (and expose us to) parasites. Because dogs and cats can be exposed to and acquire intestinal parasites at any time, we must routinely check their stools. Maintaining control of intestinal parasites in an ongoing battle.

The National Council on Parasitism and the American College of Veterinary Parasitologists recommends we check all dogs and cats for intestinal parasites twice yearly. They recommend we check puppies and kittens monthly until 6 months of age. In addition, because monthly oral heartworm preventativessuch as Interceptor and Sentinel for dogs, and Revolution for cats, help reduce the incidence of intestinal parasitism, all dogs and cats should be maintained year-round on these products.

FECAL-PLEASE BRING SAMPLE
All pet owners, and most pets, ask the same question: what’s with this fascination with my dog/cat’s poop? Why do we have to keep checking it? What’s the big deal if we don’t check it? These are very valid questions, because acquiring a stool sample, whether via the owner picking up a specimen in the yard, or direct acquisition from the pet, is not a pleasant task for anyone!

Stool samples are the specimens we need to check your pet for intestinal parasites. The intestinal parasites we check for include:
· Roundworms
· Hookworms
· Whipworms
· Tapeworms
· Coccidia
· Giardia.

Your dog or cat can get exposed to these parasites in a variety of ways. If your dog or cat is allowed to roam, it could get exposed anywhere an infected pet has defecated (ever seen a dog or cat carefully checking out someone else’s poop?) In addition, your backyard could already be contaminated by a previous occupant’s pets. Another possibility is stray cats and wildlife crossing through your yard at night, and leaving their “calling cards.”

Puppies and kittens get intestinal worms from their mothers, through the placenta and the first milk. The first stool check should be done when the litter of puppies or kittens is about 4 weeks of age, and every 2-4 weeks after that until there are TWO negative stool checks in a row.

On the average, 21% of adult dogs and cats are infested with at least one of the above parasites at any one time. Intestinal parasites can cause upset stomach, vomiting, bloating, diarrhea, increased frequency & volume of defecation, flatulence, housetraining problems, coat/skin problems, and general misery for your pet. Indoor pets can be infested, too: we can track in contaminated mud on our shoes; Giardia sporocysts can literally blow in on the wind. No pet is completely safe from being exposed to intestinal parasites.

Unfortunately, 3 of the above parasites can infect people: Roundworms, Hookworms, and Giardia. Roundworm larvae cause seizures and blindness in children. Hookworm larvae cause cutaneous larval migrans, a skin disorder, and visceral larval migrans, a chronic form of gastroenteritis, in children and adults. Giardiasis is better known by some of its more popular names: Touristas, or Montezuma’s Revenge. People get exposed to these parasites when they live and play in the same premises as an infected pet–the yard gets seeded with worm eggs & larvae, as well as Giardia sporocysts. Fecal contamination on pets’ fur can contaminate human hands; failure to properly wash hands can mean direct ingestion of parasites.

Intestinal parasites are a big problem wherever pets live in a warm, humid environment. Since most of us have back yards with sprinklers, our pets live in the perfect environment to be exposed to (and expose us to) parasites. Because dogs and cats can be exposed to and acquire intestinal parasites at any time, we must routinely check their stools. Maintaining control of intestinal parasites in an ongoing battle.

The National Council on Parasitism and the American College of Veterinary Parasitologists recommends we check all dogs and cats for intestinal parasites twice yearly. They recommend we check puppies and kittens monthly until 6 months of age. In addition, because monthly oral heartworm preventativessuch as Interceptor and Sentinel for dogs, and Revolution for cats, help reduce the incidence of intestinal parasitism, all dogs and cats should be maintained year-round on these products.

FELINE LEUKEMIA BOOSTER
Our records show your kitten/cat is due to be administered a Feline Leukemia Virus Vaccine. Feline Leukemia Virus (FeLV) is one of the three long-term, incurable viral diseases of cats. FeLV infection is responsible for more deaths among cats than any other infectious disease, making it the most devastating feline disease worldwide. In the United States, FeLV infects about 2% to 3% of all cats. Since there are 70 million cats in the United States, this means there are more than 2.3 million cats suffering from this disease right now! The virus affects domestic cats and occurs in some wild felines as well.

Tom cats are 1.7 times more likely to be infected than females, and outdoor cats are 5 times more likely to be infected than indoor cats. Cats from catteries and cats that live in multi-cat households are much higher risk of FeLV than indoor cats.

FeLV usually spreads through infected saliva, urine, tears, and feces, and through an infected mother to her kittens during gestation and nursing. Twenty percent of FeLV-positive mothers pass the virus to their kittens. Methods of transmission include the following:
· Bite wounds from infected cats (this is a huge risk for outdoor & indoor-outdoor cats)
· Mouth and nose contact with infected saliva or urine
· Mutual grooming
· Nose-to-nose contact such as through a window screen
· Shared food dishes, water bowls, litter trays
· Sneezing

The doctors of Windmill Animal Hospital have reliable diagnostic tests to detect FeLV; the test is run on-site, with results in only 10 minutes.

There is no cure for FeLV. All treatments are aimed at relieving pain and discomfort. Prevention, through vaccinations and keeping your cat indoors, is the key!

Several vaccines are available to protect your cat(s) from contracting FeLV. The vaccines are generally safe, although your cat may appear sick or sluggish for a few hours, to a couple of days afterward. Although highly reliable, FeLV vaccines are not 100% effective. Vaccinated cats may develop a short-lived infection after heavy exposure to FeLV, but rarely do they develop clinical disease. Kittens should be vaccinated at 9 to 10 weeks of age, again 3 to 4 weeks later, and then 1 year later. All outdoor cats, indoor-outdoor cats, cats living with outdoor cats or indoor-outdoor cats, and cats from catteries or multi-cat households should be re-vaccinated annually. Indoor-only cats living in 1 or 2 cat households should be re-vaccinated every 3 years, if adjuvant-containing vaccines are used.

Cats present a unique challenge, due to some health concerns found only in felines. Some cats (approximately 1 in 30,000) have an immune system that has a familial tendency to react to vaccines inappropriately. In these cats, the vaccine site is chronically inflamed post-vaccine, which can develop into a tumor. Because of this, the only Feline Leukemia vaccine for cats used at Windmill Animal Hospital is the adjuvant-free vaccine, PureVax. This vaccine is licensed to be given annually.

FELINE LEUKEMIA, FIRST VAC
Our records show your kitten/cat is due to be administered a Feline Leukemia Virus Vaccine. Feline Leukemia Virus (FeLV) is one of the three long-term, incurable viral diseases of cats. FeLV infection is responsible for more deaths among cats than any other infectious disease, making it the most devastating feline disease worldwide. In the United States, FeLV infects about 2% to 3% of all cats. Since there are 70 million cats in the United States, this means there are more than 2.3 million cats suffering from this disease right now! The virus affects domestic cats and occurs in some wild felines as well.

Tom cats are 1.7 times more likely to be infected than females, and outdoor cats are 5 times more likely to be infected than indoor cats. Cats from catteries and cats that live in multi-cat households are much higher risk of FeLV than indoor cats.

FeLV usually spreads through infected saliva, urine, tears, and feces, and through an infected mother to her kittens during gestation and nursing. Twenty percent of FeLV-positive mothers pass the virus to their kittens. Methods of transmission include the following:
· Bite wounds from infected cats (this is a huge risk for outdoor & indoor-outdoor cats)
· Mouth and nose contact with infected saliva or urine
· Mutual grooming
· Nose-to-nose contact such as through a window screen
· Shared food dishes, water bowls, litter trays
· Sneezing

The doctors of Windmill Animal Hospital have reliable diagnostic tests to detect FeLV; the test is run on-site, with results in only 10 minutes.

There is no cure for FeLV. All treatments are aimed at relieving pain and discomfort. Prevention, through vaccinations and keeping your cat indoors, is the key!

Several vaccines are available to protect your cat(s) from contracting FeLV. The vaccines are generally safe, although your cat may appear sick or sluggish for a few hours, to a couple of days afterward. Although highly reliable, FeLV vaccines are not 100% effective. Vaccinated cats may develop a short-lived infection after heavy exposure to FeLV, but rarely do they develop clinical disease. Kittens should be vaccinated at 9 to 10 weeks of age, again 3 to 4 weeks later, and then 1 year later. All outdoor cats, indoor-outdoor cats, cats living with outdoor cats or indoor-outdoor cats, and cats from catteries or multi-cat households should be re-vaccinated annually. Indoor-only cats living in 1 or 2 cat households should be re-vaccinated every 3 years, if adjuvant-containing vaccines are used.

Cats present a unique challenge, due to some health concerns found only in felines. Some cats (approximately 1 in 30,000) have an immune system that has a familial tendency to react to vaccines inappropriately. In these cats, the vaccine site is chronically inflamed post-vaccine, which can develop into a tumor. Because of this, the only Feline Leukemia vaccine for cats used at Windmill Animal Hospital is the adjuvant-free vaccine, PureVax. This vaccine is licensed to be given annually.

FELINE LEUKEMIA, SECOND VAC
Our records show your kitten/cat is due to be administered a Feline Leukemia Virus Vaccine. Feline Leukemia Virus (FeLV) is one of the three long-term, incurable viral diseases of cats. FeLV infection is responsible for more deaths among cats than any other infectious disease, making it the most devastating feline disease worldwide. In the United States, FeLV infects about 2% to 3% of all cats. Since there are 70 million cats in the United States, this means there are more than 2.3 million cats suffering from this disease right now! The virus affects domestic cats and occurs in some wild felines as well.

Tom cats are 1.7 times more likely to be infected than females, and outdoor cats are 5 times more likely to be infected than indoor cats. Cats from catteries and cats that live in multi-cat households are much higher risk of FeLV than indoor cats.

FeLV usually spreads through infected saliva, urine, tears, and feces, and through an infected mother to her kittens during gestation and nursing. Twenty percent of FeLV-positive mothers pass the virus to their kittens. Methods of transmission include the following:
· Bite wounds from infected cats (this is a huge risk for outdoor & indoor-outdoor cats)
· Mouth and nose contact with infected saliva or urine
· Mutual grooming
· Nose-to-nose contact such as through a window screen
· Shared food dishes, water bowls, litter trays
· Sneezing

The doctors of Windmill Animal Hospital have reliable diagnostic tests to detect FeLV; the test is run on-site, with results in only 10 minutes.

There is no cure for FeLV. All treatments are aimed at relieving pain and discomfort. Prevention, through vaccinations and keeping your cat indoors, is the key!

Several vaccines are available to protect your cat(s) from contracting FeLV. The vaccines are generally safe, although your cat may appear sick or sluggish for a few hours, to a couple of days afterward. Although highly reliable, FeLV vaccines are not 100% effective. Vaccinated cats may develop a short-lived infection after heavy exposure to FeLV, but rarely do they develop clinical disease. Kittens should be vaccinated at 9 to 10 weeks of age, again 3 to 4 weeks later, and then 1 year later. All outdoor cats, indoor-outdoor cats, cats living with outdoor cats or indoor-outdoor cats, and cats from catteries or multi-cat households should be re-vaccinated annually. Indoor-only cats living in 1 or 2 cat households should be re-vaccinated every 3 years, if adjuvant-containing vaccines are used.

Cats present a unique challenge, due to some health concerns found only in felines. Some cats (approximately 1 in 30,000) have an immune system that has a familial tendency to react to vaccines inappropriately. In these cats, the vaccine site is chronically inflamed post-vaccine, which can develop into a tumor. Because of this, the only Feline Leukemia vaccine for cats used at Windmill Animal Hospital is the adjuvant-free vaccine, PureVax. This vaccine is licensed to be given annually.

FELINE LEUKEMIA/AIDS/HEARTWORM COMBO TEST
Our records show your cat is due for a Feline Leukemia Virus/Feline A.I.D.S. Virus/Feline Heartworm test. FeLV/FIV/HW testing of your pet is easy and almost painless; it involves acquiring a small sample of blood (3 drops!). The blood sample is then processed in the Windmill Animal Hospital laboratory, using state-of-the-art testing equipment.

FeLV/FIV/HW testing screens your pet for two of the most deadly diseases cats can become infected with: Feline Leukemia Virus (FeLV) and Feline A.I.D.S (or Immunodeficiency) Virus (FIV). FeLV infection is responsible for more deaths among cats than any other infectious disease, making it the most devastating feline disease worldwide. In the United States, FeLV infects about 2% to 3% of all cats. Since there are 70 million cats in the United States, this means there are more than 2.2 million cats suffering from this disease right now! The virus affects domestic cats and occurs in some wild felines as well. FeLV is considered highly contagious, being easily passed from cat to cat through any contact with bodily fluids of an infected cat. There is no cure for FeLV, although there is a good vaccine for it.

FIV Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) causes an infectious disease in domestic cats and cheetahs similar to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection) in humans. It attacks and weakens the body’s immune system, making the animal susceptible to infections and diseases that don’t affect healthy cats. There is no cure for FIV, although there is a vaccine to help prevent it. Though eventually fatal, an FIV-positive cat can live for many years without any signs of illness. 3% of the cats in the United States are FIV-positive, meaning more than 1.6 million cats are enduring this disease right now. FIV is spread through fighting, biting, and breeding.

Did you know cats can get infected with heartworms, too? On average, for every 6 dogs with heartworms, there will be a cat with heartworms, too. Since cats aren’t the normal host animal for heartworms, the symptoms of heartworm disease in cats are MUCH different than in dogs. Weight loss, asthma-like symptoms, and unexplained sudden death are the most common symptoms. Cats with heartworms can’t be treated with chemotherapy to remove the worms from their bodies, but their symptoms can be managed until the cat outlives the heartworms.

Although these three diseases are not curable, they are manageable. Therefore, it is critically important that we know the FeLV/FIV/HW status of all our cats. In addition, since both viral diseases are contagious, we need to know all cats’ FeLV/FIV status to help protect the other cats they may come in contact with us. We don’t want to condemn other cats in our households or neighborhoods to a death sentence simply because we don’t know our own cats’ health status!

The doctors of Windmill Animal Hospital recommend ALL outdoor cats, indoor/outdoor cats, and cats from multi-cat households be tested annually. Newly acquired kittens and cats, including those from shelters and catteries should be tested for FeLV/FIV/HW upon acquisition. Indoor-only cats should be tested every 3 years.

FELV/FIV/HW COMBO TEST
Our records show your cat is due for a Feline Leukemia Virus/Feline A.I.D.S. Virus/Feline Heartworm test. FeLV/FIV/HW testing of your pet is easy and almost painless; it involves acquiring a small sample of blood (3 drops!). The blood sample is then processed in the Windmill Animal Hospital laboratory, using state-of-the-art testing equipment.

FeLV/FIV/HW testing screens your pet for two of the most deadly diseases cats can become infected with: Feline Leukemia Virus (FeLV) and Feline A.I.D.S (or Immunodeficiency) Virus (FIV). FeLV infection is responsible for more deaths among cats than any other infectious disease, making it the most devastating feline disease worldwide. In the United States, FeLV infects about 2% to 3% of all cats. Since there are 70 million cats in the United States, this means there are more than 2.2 million cats suffering from this disease right now! The virus affects domestic cats and occurs in some wild felines as well. FeLV is considered highly contagious, being easily passed from cat to cat through any contact with bodily fluids of an infected cat. There is no cure for FeLV, although there is a good vaccine for it.

FIV Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) causes an infectious disease in domestic cats and cheetahs similar to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection) in humans. It attacks and weakens the body’s immune system, making the animal susceptible to infections and diseases that don’t affect healthy cats. There is no cure for FIV, although there is a vaccine to help prevent it. Though eventually fatal, an FIV-positive cat can live for many years without any signs of illness. 3% of the cats in the United States are FIV-positive, meaning more than 1.6 million cats are enduring this disease right now. FIV is spread through fighting, biting, and breeding.

Did you know cats can get infected with heartworms, too? On average, for every 6 dogs with heartworms, there will be a cat with heartworms, too. Since cats aren’t the normal host animal for heartworms, the symptoms of heartworm disease in cats are MUCH different than in dogs. Weight loss, asthma-like symptoms, and unexplained sudden death are the most common symptoms. Cats with heartworms can’t be treated with chemotherapy to remove the worms from their bodies, but their symptoms can be managed until the cat outlives the heartworms.

Although these three diseases are not curable, they are manageable. Therefore, it is critically important that we know the FeLV/FIV/HW status of all our cats. In addition, since both viral diseases are contagious, we need to know all cats’ FeLV/FIV status to help protect the other cats they may come in contact with us. We don’t want to condemn other cats in our households or neighborhoods to a death sentence simply because we don’t know our own cats’ health status!

The doctors of Windmill Animal Hospital recommend ALL outdoor cats, indoor/outdoor cats, and cats from multi-cat households be tested annually. Newly acquired kittens and cats, including those from shelters and catteries should be tested for FeLV/FIV/HW upon acquisition. Indoor-only cats should be tested every 3 years.

FERRET DISTEMPER BOOSTER
Our records show your ferret is due for its Distemper vaccine. Unvaccinated ferrets are very susceptible to Canine (dog) Distemper. It is often spread by sneezing or exposure to infected dogs, or the owners carrying the virus home from contact with carrier or infected dogs. It has an incubation period of 6-9 days and is almost always fatal in ferrets. The ferrets become depressed, can have dark tarry stools, develop a skin rash, nasal and eye discharges and eventually nerve degeneration. There is no successful treatment. Early signs can be mistaken for human influenza, to which ferrets are also susceptible.

The good news is that vaccination is very successful at preventing Canine Distemper infection in ferrets. Generally, ferrets receive their first distemper vaccination at 6-8 weeks, a booster vaccination at 10-12 weeks, and again at 14-16 weeks of age. They are then given a yearly distemper booster vaccination.

FERRET DISTEMPER FIRST VAC
Our records show your ferret is due for its Distemper vaccine. Unvaccinated ferrets are very susceptible to Canine (dog) Distemper. It is often spread by sneezing or exposure to infected dogs, or the owners carrying the virus home from contact with carrier or infected dogs. It has an incubation period of 6-9 days and is almost always fatal in ferrets. The ferrets become depressed, can have dark tarry stools, develop a skin rash, nasal and eye discharges and eventually nerve degeneration. There is no successful treatment. Early signs can be mistaken for human influenza, to which ferrets are also susceptible.

The good news is that vaccination is very successful at preventing Canine Distemper infection in ferrets. Generally, ferrets receive their first distemper vaccination at 6-8 weeks, a booster vaccination at 10-12 weeks, and again at 14-16 weeks of age. They are then given a yearly distemper booster vaccination.

FERRET DISTEMPER SECOND VAC
Our records show your ferret is due for its Distemper vaccine. Unvaccinated ferrets are very susceptible to Canine (dog) Distemper. It is often spread by sneezing or exposure to infected dogs, or the owners carrying the virus home from contact with carrier or infected dogs. It has an incubation period of 6-9 days and is almost always fatal in ferrets. The ferrets become depressed, can have dark tarry stools, develop a skin rash, nasal and eye discharges and eventually nerve degeneration. There is no successful treatment. Early signs can be mistaken for human influenza, to which ferrets are also susceptible.

The good news is that vaccination is very successful at preventing Canine Distemper infection in ferrets. Generally, ferrets receive their first distemper vaccination at 6-8 weeks, a booster vaccination at 10-12 weeks, and again at 14-16 weeks of age. They are then given a yearly distemper booster vaccination.

Frontline Plus for cats 3pk
Our records show your dog needs a refill of monthly flea and tick preventative. All dogs living in Texas are at risk for an infestation of fleas and ticks. We are familiar with the misery fleas can cause–itching, chewing, scratching, hair loss & dermatitis. Fleas can also carry parasites, such as tapeworms. Did you know that your dog can get anemic from a heavy flea infestation? Severe flea infestations can cause a life-threatening anemia. Frontline Plus and Certifect both kill fleas that hop onto your dog; the “Plus” part of Frontline is an additional ingredient, an insect growth inhibitor, that keeps the eggs a flea may lay in your dog’s fur from ever hatching.

Any dog can get infested with ticks, but some lifestyles put a pooch at higher risk than others. Dogs who go hunting, camping, go to the lake, board at an indoor/outdoor kennel, or are around other dogs who do these things, are at high risk of getting infested with ticks. Ticks are dangerous parasites–they suck blood, cause dermatitis wherever they bite, and can carry several life-threatening diseases. We’ve all heard of the risk Lyme Disease, carried by ticks, poses to people as well as dogs. What you may not know is that Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever, Ehrlichiosis, Babesiosis, Anaplasmosis, and Hemobartonellosis are also carried by ticks. All of these diseases are potentially life-threatening to your dog, and are spread through the bite of a tick. Frontline Plus kills ticks in 8-12 hours, before the successful transfer of infective material can occur during the bite. Certifect has an additional ingredient, Amitraz, that makes your dog’s skin feel like a hot griddle to ticks–they scramble around on the dog’s skin trying to find a comfortable place, and get thoroughly coated with Certifect very rapidly. In addition, any attached tick will pull out shortly after application of Certifect, because its mouthparts feel like they’re burning! Certifect kills ticks within 1-2 hours, and is ideal for managing dogs with high tick exposure risk, and where there’s a persistent tick problem.

Both Certifect and Frontline Plus are applied once each month, 1 day before or 1 day after a bath. They are completely safe for use for all breeds of dogs and puppies. They are also compatible for use with all heartworm preventatives and prescription medications. The doctors of Windmill Animal Hospital recommend using Certifect or Frontline Plus with all dogs at risk of being exposed to ticks.

Did you know that you can purchase your Certifect and Frontline Plus at Windmill Animal Hospital for the same price as those other On-Line pet pharmacies? In fact, usually we are a few cents cheaper! We’ll even mail it directly to you!

FRUCTOSAMINE SERUM LEVEL
Our records show your pet is due for some diagnostic laboratory blood tests. These tests fall into 4 categories:

  1. Your pet’s previous lab work (such as a pre-anesthetic profile associated with an routine surgical procedure, or bloodwork associated with an illness your pet endured, or a previous urinary tract infection), revealed a POSSIBLE problem. You are being sent this reminder to alert you that it’s time to recheck your pet’s lab work, to verify that there IS or IS NOT a concern with your pet’s internal health. Abnormalities in lab work that commonly show up that need to be double-checked include elevated kidney values, elevated liver values, elevated white blood cell counts, depressed platelet counts, urinary tract infections/crystals, etc. Rechecking your pet’s lab work will indicate whether the abnormality has resolved, or will need to be managed in future.
  2. Your pet has been diagnosed with a chronic medical ailment, such as diabetes or compromised kidney function, and the values need a routine recheck. Routine rechecks, usually twice a year, are critical to proper management of your pet’s chronic health problem, to insure proper management and optimum comfort and longevity for your pet.
  3. Your pet is on long-term anticonvulsant medications, such as phenobarbital or potassium bromide, or is on hormonal supplementation, such as for low thyroid, or is on long-term Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammtant drugs for chronic pain. Serum anticonvulsant medication levels MUST be checked at least annually, as well as a Complete Blood Count and a General Chemistry Panel. If the levels get too low, therefore, ineffective, your pet will start seizing again. If the levels get too high, the anticonvulsant drug becomes dangerous, toxic, and could induce the very seizures it is designed to prevent. The only way to know if the dose of anticonvulsant is correct is to check the serum levels. The only way to make sure the anticonvulsant isn’t causing problems with your pet’s internal organ health is to do blood work. Thyroid and other hormone supplementation must also be checked at least annually–if the dose is too low, your pet will receive no benefit and you will waste your time and money; if the dose is too high, your pet’s health could be seriously harmed. NonSteroidal Anti-Inflammatant Drugs (known as NSAIDs) do a very good job of relieving pain, but they ALL can cause digestive upset, they ALL put stress on the liver, and they ALL lower blood pressure to the kidneys. Therefore, pets on long-term NSAIDs MUST have their liver & kidney health checked at least every 6 months, as well as a complete blod count to verify no chronic blood loss through GIT inflammation.
  4. Your pet is 8 years of age or older, and needs routine blood screens to verify normal internal organ health. All senior pets (8 years +), and, especially geriatric pets (10 years +), should have their internal health assessed via blood work at least annually. The earlier a developing problem is detected, the easier and less expensive it is to manage.

Windmill Animal Hospital has extensive in-house lab test capability; we are able to process most of our patients’ lab testing needs right here at our hospital. This means fast turn-around, and accurate results for you, our client!

Please call or email us today, to discuss your pet’s lab work needs, and get an appointment scheduled.

FVRCP BOOSTER
Our records indicate it’s time for your cat or kitten to receive an FVRCP vaccine. What’s this? Alphabet soup? Actually, it’s veterinary “shorthand” for a very important vaccine for cats and kittens:

“F” stands for Feline. In other words, this vaccine and the diseases it protects against are of concern to cats only.

“V” stands for Viral. All the diseases this vaccine protects against are viruses.

“R” stands for Rhinotracheitis. Whew! That’s a mouthful! Rhinotracheitis is a viral infection that affects cats much like a cold or flu affects humans. Infected cats run a significant fever, loss of appetite, sinus congestion, sneezing, and ulcers of the mouth and corneas. Uncomplicated infections of Rhino are usually no more severe than a cold for a human. However, even mild infections can become life-threatening if secondary bacterial infections develop and descend into the lungs.

Rhino is highly contagious and very common. Cats who have recovered from it will periodically shed the virus throughout their lives in times of stress. Unsuspecting cat owners can carry the virus from an ill or viral-shedding cat to their homes. This is a common way that feline upper respiratory infections are transmitted.

Treatment consists of fluids, antibiotics, nebulization (a process to humidify the air and keep the nasal passages moist), and eye medications.

Vaccines are quite effective to help protect cats & kittens against Rhino. Kittens should receive 3 vaccinations, 4 weeks apart. Vaccine-induced disease resistance is not long-lasting, so all cats should be re-vaccinated annually.

“C” stands for Calicivirus. Calici causes the same misery for our poor cats that Rhino does.

Kittens should be vaccinated 3 times against Calici, 4 weeks apart. Again, vaccine-induced immunity is short-lived, so the vaccine should be repeated annually in all cats.

“P” stands for Panleukopenia. It’s called Panleukopenia because of how the virus will temporarily wipe out the infected cat or kitten’s bone marrow of the precursor cells that produce white blood cells, red blood cells, and platelets. Panleukopenia is a virus that usually causes clinical signs of severe gastroenteritis, with the primary signs of disease being loss of appetite, vomiting and diarrhea. In addition to the digestive tract signs, infected cats and kittens will be depressed, run a high fever, and be very weak. Kittens can die within 24 hours of onset of clinical signs. Without treatment, panleukopenia has a very high mortality rate.

Treatment consists of intravenous fluids, broad-spectrum antibiotics, injectable medications to control vomiting, intravenous nutritional support and blood transfusions.

Vaccinations offer excellent protection against Panleukopenia. Kittens normally receive a series of 3 vaccinations, spaced 4 weeks apart. An additional booster is then administered 1 year later. After that, the pet should be boostered every 1-2 years, depending on lifestyle and other factors.

Cats present a unique challenge, due to some health concerns found only in felines. Some cats (approximately 1 in 30,000) have an immune system that has a familial tendency to react to vaccines inappropriately. In these cats, the vaccine site is chronically inflamed post-vaccine, which can develop into a tumor. Because of this, the only FVRCP vaccine for cats used at Windmill Animal Hospital is the adjuvant-free vaccine, PureVax. This vaccine is licensed to be given annually.

FVRCP FIRST VACCINE
Our records indicate it’s time for your cat or kitten to receive an FVRCP vaccine. What’s this? Alphabet soup? Actually, it’s veterinary “shorthand” for a very important vaccine for cats and kittens:

“F” stands for Feline. In other words, this vaccine and the diseases it protects against are of concern to cats only.

“V” stands for Viral. All the diseases this vaccine protects against are viruses.

“R” stands for Rhinotracheitis. Whew! That’s a mouthful! Rhinotracheitis is a viral infection that affects cats much like a cold or flu affects humans. Infected cats run a significant fever, loss of appetite, sinus congestion, sneezing, and ulcers of the mouth and corneas. Uncomplicated infections of Rhino are usually no more severe than a cold for a human. However, even mild infections can become life-threatening if secondary bacterial infections develop and descend into the lungs.

Rhino is highly contagious and very common. Cats who have recovered from it will periodically shed the virus throughout their lives in times of stress. Unsuspecting cat owners can carry the virus from an ill or viral-shedding cat to their homes. This is a common way that feline upper respiratory infections are transmitted.

Treatment consists of fluids, antibiotics, nebulization (a process to humidify the air and keep the nasal passages moist), and eye medications.

Vaccines are quite effective to help protect cats & kittens against Rhino. Kittens should receive 3 vaccinations, 4 weeks apart. Vaccine-induced disease resistance is not long-lasting, so all cats should be re-vaccinated annually.

“C” stands for Calicivirus. Calici causes the same misery for our poor cats that Rhino does.

Kittens should be vaccinated 3 times against Calici, 4 weeks apart. Again, vaccine-induced immunity is short-lived, so the vaccine should be repeated annually in all cats.

“P” stands for Panleukopenia. It’s called Panleukopenia because of how the virus will temporarily wipe out the infected cat or kitten’s bone marrow of the precursor cells that produce white blood cells, red blood cells, and platelets. Panleukopenia is a virus that usually causes clinical signs of severe gastroenteritis, with the primary signs of disease being loss of appetite, vomiting and diarrhea. In addition to the digestive tract signs, infected cats and kittens will be depressed, run a high fever, and be very weak. Kittens can die within 24 hours of onset of clinical signs. Without treatment, panleukopenia has a very high mortality rate.

Treatment consists of intravenous fluids, broad-spectrum antibiotics, injectable medications to control vomiting, intravenous nutritional support and blood transfusions.

Vaccinations offer excellent protection against Panleukopenia. Kittens normally receive a series of 3 vaccinations, spaced 4 weeks apart. An additional booster is then administered 1 year later. After that, the pet should be boostered every 1-2 years, depending on lifestyle and other factors.

Cats present a unique challenge, due to some health concerns found only in felines. Some cats (approximately 1 in 30,000) have an immune system that has a familial tendency to react to vaccines inappropriately. In these cats, the vaccine site is chronically inflamed post-vaccine, which can develop into a tumor. Because of this, the only FVRCP vaccine for cats used at Windmill Animal Hospital is the adjuvant-free vaccine, PureVax. This vaccine is licensed to be given annually.

FVRCP SECOND VACCINE
Our records indicate it’s time for your cat or kitten to receive an FVRCP vaccine. What’s this? Alphabet soup? Actually, it’s veterinary “shorthand” for a very important vaccine for cats and kittens:

“F” stands for Feline. In other words, this vaccine and the diseases it protects against are of concern to cats only.

“V” stands for Viral. All the diseases this vaccine protects against are viruses.

“R” stands for Rhinotracheitis. Whew! That’s a mouthful! Rhinotracheitis is a viral infection that affects cats much like a cold or flu affects humans. Infected cats run a significant fever, loss of appetite, sinus congestion, sneezing, and ulcers of the mouth and corneas. Uncomplicated infections of Rhino are usually no more severe than a cold for a human. However, even mild infections can become life-threatening if secondary bacterial infections develop and descend into the lungs.

Rhino is highly contagious and very common. Cats who have recovered from it will periodically shed the virus throughout their lives in times of stress. Unsuspecting cat owners can carry the virus from an ill or viral-shedding cat to their homes. This is a common way that feline upper respiratory infections are transmitted.

Treatment consists of fluids, antibiotics, nebulization (a process to humidify the air and keep the nasal passages moist), and eye medications.

Vaccines are quite effective to help protect cats & kittens against Rhino. Kittens should receive 3 vaccinations, 4 weeks apart. Vaccine-induced disease resistance is not long-lasting, so all cats should be re-vaccinated annually.

“C” stands for Calicivirus. Calici causes the same misery for our poor cats that Rhino does.

Kittens should be vaccinated 3 times against Calici, 4 weeks apart. Again, vaccine-induced immunity is short-lived, so the vaccine should be repeated annually in all cats.

“P” stands for Panleukopenia. It’s called Panleukopenia because of how the virus will temporarily wipe out the infected cat or kitten’s bone marrow of the precursor cells that produce white blood cells, red blood cells, and platelets. Panleukopenia is a virus that usually causes clinical signs of severe gastroenteritis, with the primary signs of disease being loss of appetite, vomiting and diarrhea. In addition to the digestive tract signs, infected cats and kittens will be depressed, run a high fever, and be very weak. Kittens can die within 24 hours of onset of clinical signs. Without treatment, panleukopenia has a very high mortality rate.

Treatment consists of intravenous fluids, broad-spectrum antibiotics, injectable medications to control vomiting, intravenous nutritional support and blood transfusions.

Vaccinations offer excellent protection against Panleukopenia. Kittens normally receive a series of 3 vaccinations, spaced 4 weeks apart. An additional booster is then administered 1 year later. After that, the pet should be boostered every 1-2 years, depending on lifestyle and other factors.

Cats present a unique challenge, due to some health concerns found only in felines. Some cats (approximately 1 in 30,000) have an immune system that has a familial tendency to react to vaccines inappropriately. In these cats, the vaccine site is chronically inflamed post-vaccine, which can develop into a tumor. Because of this, the only FVRCP vaccine for cats used at Windmill Animal Hospital is the adjuvant-free vaccine, PureVax. This vaccine is licensed to be given annually.

FVRCP THIRD VACCINE
Our records indicate it’s time for your cat or kitten to receive an FVRCP vaccine. What’s this? Alphabet soup? Actually, it’s veterinary “shorthand” for a very important vaccine for cats and kittens:

“F” stands for Feline. In other words, this vaccine and the diseases it protects against are of concern to cats only.

“V” stands for Viral. All the diseases this vaccine protects against are viruses.

“R” stands for Rhinotracheitis. Whew! That’s a mouthful! Rhinotracheitis is a viral infection that affects cats much like a cold or flu affects humans. Infected cats run a significant fever, loss of appetite, sinus congestion, sneezing, and ulcers of the mouth and corneas. Uncomplicated infections of Rhino are usually no more severe than a cold for a human. However, even mild infections can become life-threatening if secondary bacterial infections develop and descend into the lungs.

Rhino is highly contagious and very common. Cats who have recovered from it will periodically shed the virus throughout their lives in times of stress. Unsuspecting cat owners can carry the virus from an ill or viral-shedding cat to their homes. This is a common way that feline upper respiratory infections are transmitted.

Treatment consists of fluids, antibiotics, nebulization (a process to humidify the air and keep the nasal passages moist), and eye medications.

Vaccines are quite effective to help protect cats & kittens against Rhino. Kittens should receive 3 vaccinations, 4 weeks apart. Vaccine-induced disease resistance is not long-lasting, so all cats should be re-vaccinated annually.

“C” stands for Calicivirus. Calici causes the same misery for our poor cats that Rhino does.

Kittens should be vaccinated 3 times against Calici, 4 weeks apart. Again, vaccine-induced immunity is short-lived, so the vaccine should be repeated annually in all cats.

“P” stands for Panleukopenia. It’s called Panleukopenia because of how the virus will temporarily wipe out the infected cat or kitten’s bone marrow of the precursor cells that produce white blood cells, red blood cells, and platelets. Panleukopenia is a virus that usually causes clinical signs of severe gastroenteritis, with the primary signs of disease being loss of appetite, vomiting and diarrhea. In addition to the digestive tract signs, infected cats and kittens will be depressed, run a high fever, and be very weak. Kittens can die within 24 hours of onset of clinical signs. Without treatment, panleukopenia has a very high mortality rate.

Treatment consists of intravenous fluids, broad-spectrum antibiotics, injectable medications to control vomiting, intravenous nutritional support and blood transfusions.

Vaccinations offer excellent protection against Panleukopenia. Kittens normally receive a series of 3 vaccinations, spaced 4 weeks apart. An additional booster is then administered 1 year later. After that, the pet should be boostered every 1-2 years, depending on lifestyle and other factors.

Cats present a unique challenge, due to some health concerns found only in felines. Some cats (approximately 1 in 30,000) have an immune system that has a familial tendency to react to vaccines inappropriately. In these cats, the vaccine site is chronically inflamed post-vaccine, which can develop into a tumor. Because of this, the only FVRCP vaccine for cats used at Windmill Animal Hospital is the adjuvant-free vaccine, PureVax. This vaccine is licensed to be given annually.

HEALTH CHECK PLUS PROFILE (#46)
Our records show your pet is due for some diagnostic laboratory blood tests. These tests fall into 4 categories:

  1. Your pet’s previous lab work (such as a pre-anesthetic profile associated with an routine surgical procedure, or bloodwork associated with an illness your pet endured, or a previous urinary tract infection), revealed a POSSIBLE problem. You are being sent this reminder to alert you that it’s time to recheck your pet’s lab work, to verify that there IS or IS NOT a concern with your pet’s internal health. Abnormalities in lab work that commonly show up that need to be double-checked include elevated kidney values, elevated liver values, elevated white blood cell counts, depressed platelet counts, urinary tract infections/crystals, etc. Rechecking your pet’s lab work will indicate whether the abnormality has resolved, or will need to be managed in future.
  2. Your pet has been diagnosed with a chronic medical ailment, such as diabetes or compromised kidney function, and the values need a routine recheck. Routine rechecks, usually twice a year, are critical to proper management of your pet’s chronic health problem, to insure proper management and optimum comfort and longevity for your pet.
  3. Your pet is on long-term anticonvulsant medications, such as phenobarbital or potassium bromide, or is on hormonal supplementation, such as for low thyroid, or is on long-term Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammtant drugs for chronic pain. Serum anticonvulsant medication levels MUST be checked at least annually, as well as a Complete Blood Count and a General Chemistry Panel. If the levels get too low, therefore, ineffective, your pet will start seizing again. If the levels get too high, the anticonvulsant drug becomes dangerous, toxic, and could induce the very seizures it is designed to prevent. The only way to know if the dose of anticonvulsant is correct is to check the serum levels. The only way to make sure the anticonvulsant isn’t causing problems with your pet’s internal organ health is to do blood work. Thyroid and other hormone supplementation must also be checked at least annually–if the dose is too low, your pet will receive no benefit and you will waste your time and money; if the dose is too high, your pet’s health could be seriously harmed. NonSteroidal Anti-Inflammatant Drugs (known as NSAIDs) do a very good job of relieving pain, but they ALL can cause digestive upset, they ALL put stress on the liver, and they ALL lower blood pressure to the kidneys. Therefore, pets on long-term NSAIDs MUST have their liver & kidney health checked at least every 6 months, as well as a complete blod count to verify no chronic blood loss through GIT inflammation.
  4. Your pet is 8 years of age or older, and needs routine blood screens to verify normal internal organ health. All senior pets (8 years +), and, especially geriatric pets (10 years +), should have their internal health assessed via blood work at least annually. The earlier a developing problem is detected, the easier and less expensive it is to manage.

Windmill Animal Hospital has extensive in-house lab test capability; we are able to process most of our patients’ lab testing needs right here at our hospital. This means fast turn-around, and accurate results for you, our client!

Please call or email us today, to discuss your pet’s lab work needs, and get an appointment scheduled.

Heartgard Plus < 25 lbs 6 pack
This is a monthly oral heartworm preventative, with an added ingredient to help eliminate intestinal worms, in dogs. Heartgard was the first of the monthly oral heartworm preventatives developed, back in 1987.
Heartgard Plus 26-50 lbs 6 pack
This is a monthly oral heartworm preventative, with an added ingredient to help eliminate intestinal worms, in dogs. Heartgard was the first of the monthly oral heartworm preventatives developed, back in 1987.
Heartgard Plus 51-100 lbs, 6 pack
This is a monthly oral heartworm preventative, with an added ingredient to help eliminate intestinal worms, in dogs. Heartgard was the first of the monthly oral heartworm preventatives developed, back in 1987.
HEARTWORM OCC/LYME/EHR/ANA+
Our records show your pet is due for a heartworm test. Heartworm testing of your pet is easy and almost painless; it involves acquiring a small sample of blood (3 drops!). The blood sample is then processed in the Windmill Animal Hospital laboratory, using state-of-the-art testing equipment.

The doctors of Windmill Animal Hospital recommend all dogs over 6 months of age to be heartworm tested annually, using the combination 4DX+ test kit. This kit tests your dog not only for heartworms, but also tests for Lyme Disease, 2 species of Anaplasmosis and two species of Ehrlichia (4 tick-borne disease causing life-threatening fevers and anemia, that are also contagious to humans). Ticks are a HUGE problem in Abilene and the Big Country, so making sure our beloved canine friends aren’t infected with a tick-borne disease is critically important. In addition, a dog infected with Lyme disease can act as a reservoir, increasing the risk of exposure to the disease for humans around him.

The heartworm direct/difil test is performed for dogs who haven’t been maintained properly on heartworm prevention. It involves examining a fresh blood smear under the microscope for heartworm larvae; these larvae are called microfilaria, and look like little transparent snakes streaming through your dog’s blood!

Dog owners who, very responsibly, keep their pets on faithful heartworm prevention always wonder why their dogs need to be annually tested for heartworms. All heartworm preventatives are prescription medications for a very good reason: they cannot be 100% effective, due to the fact that NO medication is 100% effective, and any dog given heartworm preventative who has heartworms can have a fatal drug reaction between the heartworm preventative and the heartworms. The American Heartworm Association recommends EVERY dog, whether on heartworm preventative or not, be tested for heartworms annually. In addition, the manufacturers of the heartworm preventatives require any dog, 6 months of age or older, be tested prior to starting heartworm prevention, and annually thereafter.

Cat owners are always curious as to why we recommend annual heartworm testing for their kitties. Although cats are not the definitive host for heartworms, they still are at a considerable risk for infection. Mosquitoes don’t distinguish between hosts–they bite whoever is available! Indoor-only cats account for 1/3 of all documented cases. Heartworm disease in cats is very different than in dogs; coughing and breathing problems are common, but so are but weight loss and vomiting. However, one of the most common symptoms is sudden, unexplained death of the cat. Heartworm disease in cats is NOT curable, but it is manageable–if we know about it. Heartworms can live in a cat for up to two years; if we manage the cat’s heartworm disease, he/she can outlive the heartworms. For that reason, all cats in Texas should be on monthly heartworm prevention.

HEARTWORM TREATMENT: A.S.A.P.!
Our records show your dog has heartworm disease, and needs to start its heartworm chemotherapy. How did this happen, and what are the details of how to cure your pet? Please read on, to learn what you need to know about your dog’s heartworm disease, and why we urge all dogs with heartworm disease to be treated as soon as possible.

Heartworm Lifecycle

HeartwormHeartworms have what is called an obligate indirect life cycle. This means they require two separate hosts in order to complete their life cycle.

Adult heartworms live in dogs, occasionally in cats, rarely in humans, and can infect numerous species of wildlife and marine mammals. These adult worms are about 6 to 14 inches long. They live in the right side of the heart and the large blood vessels. Their rough cuticle or “skin” causes severe irritation to the delicate tissues lining the right ventricle, the pulmonary arteries, and the caudal vena cava. This irritation leads to permanent, irreversible damage to the heart and lungs, as well as the characteristic symptoms of heartworm disease: exercise intolerance, weight loss, and congestive heart failure. That’s the main reason we want all heartworm-positive dogs to be treated for their heartworms as soon as possible.

Heartworms are live bearers, rather than egg layers (similar to guppies). Adult male and female worms produce thousands of microscopic baby worms, or microfilaria. These baby heartworms are visible in a fresh drop of blood under the microscope; they look like tiny transparent snakes. The next step in the life cycle involves a mosquito. The mosquito comes along and bites the infected dog, accidentally sucking up baby heartworms. Over the next 3 weeks, the baby heartworm develops into the next stage of the life cycle while inside the mosquito. Next, the mosquito bites another dog, infecting the new dog with the baby heartworms it is carrying. It takes 4-6 months for the baby heartworms to go through 5 more stages of development while migrating through the tissues to the host’s heart. Once there, the baby heartworms mature into adults, start producing baby heartworms, and the life cycle is complete. Because a heartworm-positive dog helps perpetuate the life cycle, we want all heartworm-positive dogs treated, so that they can’t contribute to infecting other dogs.

Heartworms in Texas

Heartworms flourish in any environment where mosquitoes do well. As you are well aware, Texas has a very warm climate.. Mosquitoes have plentiful areas to breed, and fly any day it’s warmer than 45 degrees Fahrenheit. Consequently, mosquitoes are flying year round. Therefore, all dogs, cats, marine mammals and numerous species of captive exotics and wild carnivores should be protected with heartworm preventative 12 months a year.

Hurricane Katrina, in 2005, has had a lingering effect on the health of dogs, cats and all heartworm-susceptible animals all over the United States and Canada. Thousands of dogs were rescued from the floodwaters of New Orleans, and air-lifted to animal shelters all over North America. Unfortunately, a high percentage of these dogs were heartworm-positive. As a consequence, mosquito populations that were previously uncontaminated with heartworm larvae have been contaminated, and dogs living in those heretofore heartworm-free areas now must be maintained on heartworm prevention. Calgary and Las Vegas are two notable examples. The Abilene area and all of the Big Country here in central west Texas saw a significant jump in heartworm cases since 2005, due to the Katrina dogs brought to our area.

Heartworm Treatment

Although heartworms can be fatal and treatment for the disease involves risk, the condition is nearly always curable. Treatment requires careful medical care and complete rest at home afterwards.

The first thing we will do is evaluate your dog’s condition, performing a physical examination, laboratory tests and chest x-rays to evaluate the condition of the heart and lungs. We might find other health problems that need attention first, or if the heartworm infestation is very severe, we might want to modify our treatment plan.

Adult heartworms are 6 to 14 inches long and live mostly inside the heart. Baby heartworms are microscopic and live within blood vessels throughout the body. Each stage must be treated separately. First, we put your dog on a systemic antibiotic for 30 days that will help weaken the heartworms by killing a critical bacteria that lives in the heartworm intestine. In addition, we’ll put your dog on anti-inflammatants to help minimize the damage caused by the heartworms. Next, we’ll start your dog on a monthly heartworm preventative, under very careful supervision, to prevent any further heartworms from developing, as well as to slowly remove the baby heartworms from your dog’s bloodstream so that he isn’t contagious to other dogs.

Once your dog has been on the monthly heartworm preventative for at least 4 months, we know that there aren’t any immature heartworms “in the pipeline” between the mosquito’s infective bite and arriving in your dog’s heart. Now, it’s time to eliminate the adult worms by giving 2 sets of chemotherapy injections, spaced a month apart..

After each set of chemotherapy injections, your dog’s heartworms will be dead or dying. That’s good, but the heart is still full of worms. The worms gradually break into smaller and smaller pieces until the fragments are tiny enough for the body to eliminate them. The critical period is when worm fragments are small enough to disperse into the body but still large enough to plug small arteries in the lungs. Vigorous activity makes the heart pump faster, pushing bits of dead heartworm out into small blood vessels where they can cause trouble, so it’s critically important that your dog be kept very quiet.

Home Care

Your dog needs rest (indoors or on a leash) for four weeks. Dogs that are kept outdoors must become an indoor dog until the recovery period is through. If you see any sign of illness such as poor appetite, coughing, depression or vomiting, there may be a problem. Check your dog’s temperature using an ordinary human rectaldigital thermometer. Lubricate the thermometer with Vaseline or KY Jelly, insert halfway and read when it beeps. The morning temperature should be below 102.4. Dogs with a morning temperature higher than this should be examined. Early treatment will control most complications.

After the initial chemotherapy, you’ll need to bring your dog back in for brief recheck visits once a week. Not only will one of our staff doctors thoroughly examine your dog, we’ll also interview YOU about what you’ve observed during the week.

After four weeks, the adult heartworms are gone but there may still be thousands of baby heartworms in the bloodstream. First, we’ll do a quick minor blood test to check if there are/are not baby heartworms in your dog’s blood. If there are, we will schedule your dog to spend a day with us about four weeks after the second chemotherapy treatment. First we give a drug to reduce possible reactions. Then, about half an hour later, we give the oral medication to remove the baby heartworms from the blood. Two weeks later, we’ll draw a small blood sample to verify all the baby heartworms are gone–at that time, it’s safe to allow moderate exercise. Because the heart and lungs are not yet completely back to normal, it is a good idea to avoid heavy exercise like hunting or ball chasing for an additional eight weeks.

Follow-up Testing

Sometimes a few heartworms survive treatment. To detect these worms, we do a final test six months later. If any heartworms are still alive, the injections must be repeated

Summary

· antibiotics, antiinflammatants, heartworm prevention for 4 months
· hospital treatment for adult worms (about 3 days)
· Rest at home for 4 weeks
· Second hospital treatment for adult worms (about 3 days)
· Rest at home for another 4 weeks
· Hospital treatment for baby heartworms (if needed)
· Rest at home another 2 weeks
· Test to make sure all baby heartworms are gone
· Monthly Interceptor or Sentinel, permanently
· After 6 months, test for surviving adult worms

Although other drugs have been used in the past, practically all veterinarians use an arsenic-containing drug called Immiticide – safer than what we used in the past but more expensive. It is given by injection deep into the muscles of the lower back. With proper pre-treatment evaluation through physical exam, blood work, and chest films, the use of newer and safer drugs, diligent control of pain and attentive nursing care, we can treat dogs for heartworm much more safely and a lot more comfortably.

INJECTION-ADEQUAN, PER 100 MG
Adequan is an injectable polysulfated glycosaminoglycan or PSGAG. Translated into plain English, Adequan is an injectable medication that helps reverse the effects of osteoarthritis on your dog’s joint cartilage and synovial fluid, thereby helping reduce chronic pain and improve mobility. It is NOT considered a substitute for oral glucosamine supplements; rather, it is an adjunct therapy to use CONCURRENTLY with oral glucosamines, to help speed up the relief of and reversal of arthritic pain and symptoms.

Adequan has been approved for veterinary use for more than 20 years; it has a long track record of efficacy and superb safety. Arthritis dogs should receive Adequan injections twice weekly for a month, then once weekly for a month, then every 2-4 weeks thereafter, to help maintain optimum benefits on sore, arthritic joints.

INJECTION–HW PREV, 6-MOS, <11LBS
Our records show your dog is due for a renewal of his 6-month heartworm prevention injection, ProHeart6. ProHeart6 is a safe, effective way to prevent heartworms and intestinal worms in all dogs. More importantly, dog owners are freed up from the worry of remembering to give oral monthly heartworm preventatives on time.

The active ingredient, moxidectin, is in the same drug family as the monthly oral heartworm preventatives we are already familiar with: Heartgard, Interceptor, and Sentinel. ProHeart6 is simply used differently, employing already tried-and-true technology. The same techniques used to formulate the medicine in DepoProvera 3-month injections for women are used to formulate ProHeart6 6-month injections, allowing a timed release of the medication for complete prevention of heartworms and intestinal worms in dogs.

ProHeart6 is considered more effective than oral monthly heartworm preventatives due to once the injection is administered, the medication will be in the dog’s system for the prescribed 6 months. Oral medications are subject to several variables: did the dog actually eat it, did the dog throw up the medication, was the medication properly absorbed in the digestive tract, etc.

The doctors of Windmill Animal Hospital recommend ProHeart6 6-month heartworm prevention injections for all dogs over 6 months of age.

INJECTION–HW PREV, 6-MOS, 11-25#
Our records show your dog is due for a renewal of his 6-month heartworm prevention injection, ProHeart6. ProHeart6 is a safe, effective way to prevent heartworms and intestinal worms in all dogs. More importantly, dog owners are freed up from the worry of remembering to give oral monthly heartworm preventatives on time.

The active ingredient, moxidectin, is in the same drug family as the monthly oral heartworm preventatives we are already familiar with: Heartgard, Interceptor, and Sentinel. ProHeart6 is simply used differently, employing already tried-and-true technology. The same techniques used to formulate the medicine in DepoProvera 3-month injections for women are used to formulate ProHeart6 6-month injections, allowing a timed release of the medication for complete prevention of heartworms and intestinal worms in dogs.

ProHeart6 is considered more effective than oral monthly heartworm preventatives due to once the injection is administered, the medication will be in the dog’s system for the prescribed 6 months. Oral medications are subject to several variables: did the dog actually eat it, did the dog throw up the medication, was the medication properly absorbed in the digestive tract, etc.

The doctors of Windmill Animal Hospital recommend ProHeart6 6-month heartworm prevention injections for all dogs over 6 months of age.

INJECTION–HW PREV, 6-MOS, 26-50#
Our records show your dog is due for a renewal of his 6-month heartworm prevention injection, ProHeart6. ProHeart6 is a safe, effective way to prevent heartworms and intestinal worms in all dogs. More importantly, dog owners are freed up from the worry of remembering to give oral monthly heartworm preventatives on time.

The active ingredient, moxidectin, is in the same drug family as the monthly oral heartworm preventatives we are already familiar with: Heartgard, Interceptor, and Sentinel. ProHeart6 is simply used differently, employing already tried-and-true technology. The same techniques used to formulate the medicine in DepoProvera 3-month injections for women are used to formulate ProHeart6 6-month injections, allowing a timed release of the medication for complete prevention of heartworms and intestinal worms in dogs.

ProHeart6 is considered more effective than oral monthly heartworm preventatives due to once the injection is administered, the medication will be in the dog’s system for the prescribed 6 months. Oral medications are subject to several variables: did the dog actually eat it, did the dog throw up the medication, was the medication properly absorbed in the digestive tract, etc.

The doctors of Windmill Animal Hospital recommend ProHeart6 6-month heartworm prevention injections for all dogs over 6 months of age.

INJECTION–HW PREV, 6-MOS, 51-100#
Our records show your dog is due for a renewal of his 6-month heartworm prevention injection, ProHeart6. ProHeart6 is a safe, effective way to prevent heartworms and intestinal worms in all dogs. More importantly, dog owners are freed up from the worry of remembering to give oral monthly heartworm preventatives on time.

The active ingredient, moxidectin, is in the same drug family as the monthly oral heartworm preventatives we are already familiar with: Heartgard, Interceptor, and Sentinel. ProHeart6 is simply used differently, employing already tried-and-true technology. The same techniques used to formulate the medicine in DepoProvera 3-month injections for women are used to formulate ProHeart6 6-month injections, allowing a timed release of the medication for complete prevention of heartworms and intestinal worms in dogs.

ProHeart6 is considered more effective than oral monthly heartworm preventatives due to once the injection is administered, the medication will be in the dog’s system for the prescribed 6 months. Oral medications are subject to several variables: did the dog actually eat it, did the dog throw up the medication, was the medication properly absorbed in the digestive tract, etc.

The doctors of Windmill Animal Hospital recommend ProHeart6 6-month heartworm prevention injections for all dogs over 6 months of age.

K9 FLU VACCINE, BIVALENT, 1ST
CANINE INFLUENZA HAS RE-APPEARED, AND IS EPIDEMIC
DIAGNOSED IN 10+ STATES, INCLUDING TEXAS, AND AT LEAST 5 DOGS HAVE DIED

The “original” Canine Influenza:        H3N8   in U.S. since 2004

The “new” Canine Influenza:  H3N2   in U.S. since 2015–current strain causing the epidemic

  • HIGHLY  CONTAGIOUS:
    • spread by contact with respiratory droplets from coughing/sneezing, and other body fluids;
    • unsuspecting pet owners can bring it home on their hands/clothing/shoes and infect their own dogs indirectly!!
    • 3-7 days incubation
  • SYMPTOMS:
    • starts with sneezing, reverse sneezing, “tickling” cough
    • progresses rapidly in less than 24 hours to fever (102 to 105), lethargy, severe cough
    • those with a more severe version develop a very high fever (105+) and hemorrhagic pneumonia (bleeding lungs)–affected dogs require intensive care and many DIE
    • some lucky dogs have subclinical infections–no symptoms at all, but shed the virus in all body fluids for up to 30 days, thereby exposing many unsuspecting dogs and owners
  • WHICH DOGS GET THE MILD FORM AND WHICH DOGS GET SEVERELY ILL?
    • snub-nosed breeds, puppies, elderly dogs, and dogs with chronic health problems are at highest risk of the hemorrhagic pneumonia form of Canine Flu.
    • when a dog has CONCURRENT exposure to multiple respiratory diseases (distemper virus, parainfluenza virus, bordetella, and/or hepatitis virus) at the same time AND/OR a dog has been under stress (boarding, grooming, attending dog shows, etc.), that dog is at HIGH risk of the severe form of Canine Flu
  • TREATMENT:
    • supportive care (antibiotics, fever-reducing medications, fluids) for 2-3 weeks
    • about 10% of dogs with Canine Influenza die as a result of the infection
  • there is a vaccine available for each strain of Canine Influenza, no one knows how much cross-protection occurs
  • canine flu does NOT infect people

Which dogs should be vaccinated?

  • dogs at highest risk are those with contact with lots of other dogs:  boarding kennels, grooming salons, doggie day care, animal shelters, dog competitions/events, dog parks, etc.
  • snub-nosed breeds and dogs with pre-existing health problems are at highly at risk for developing the severe form of Canine Flu if they are exposed

What can be done to prevent canine influenza cases?

  • infected dogs should be isolated immediately, with a separate air supply
  • canine flu virus is easily killed by common disinfectants; pay particular attention to door knobs and other items people touch commonly
  • wash hands and arms thoroughly after handling an unfamiliar dog, and disinfect shoes after being in a possibly contaminated area
  • the current Canine Influenza virus vaccines reliably prevents Canine Flu:
    • start with 2 vaccines, spaced 2-4 weeks apart, then booster annually
    • for Windmill pets who have received the original flu vaccine, we can booster with just the new strain
K9 FLU VACCINE, BIVALENT, 2ND
CANINE INFLUENZA HAS RE-APPEARED, AND IS EPIDEMIC
DIAGNOSED IN 10+ STATES, INCLUDING TEXAS, AND AT LEAST 5 DOGS HAVE DIED

The “original” Canine Influenza:        H3N8   in U.S. since 2004

The “new” Canine Influenza:  H3N2   in U.S. since 2015–current strain causing the epidemic

  • HIGHLY  CONTAGIOUS:
    • spread by contact with respiratory droplets from coughing/sneezing, and other body fluids;
    • unsuspecting pet owners can bring it home on their hands/clothing/shoes and infect their own dogs indirectly!!
    • 3-7 days incubation
  • SYMPTOMS:
    • starts with sneezing, reverse sneezing, “tickling” cough
    • progresses rapidly in less than 24 hours to fever (102 to 105), lethargy, severe cough
    • those with a more severe version develop a very high fever (105+) and hemorrhagic pneumonia (bleeding lungs)–affected dogs require intensive care and many DIE
    • some lucky dogs have subclinical infections–no symptoms at all, but shed the virus in all body fluids for up to 30 days, thereby exposing many unsuspecting dogs and owners
  • WHICH DOGS GET THE MILD FORM AND WHICH DOGS GET SEVERELY ILL?
    • snub-nosed breeds, puppies, elderly dogs, and dogs with chronic health problems are at highest risk of the hemorrhagic pneumonia form of Canine Flu.
    • when a dog has CONCURRENT exposure to multiple respiratory diseases (distemper virus, parainfluenza virus, bordetella, and/or hepatitis virus) at the same time AND/OR a dog has been under stress (boarding, grooming, attending dog shows, etc.), that dog is at HIGH risk of the severe form of Canine Flu
  • TREATMENT:
    • supportive care (antibiotics, fever-reducing medications, fluids) for 2-3 weeks
    • about 10% of dogs with Canine Influenza die as a result of the infection
  • there is a vaccine available for each strain of Canine Influenza, no one knows how much cross-protection occurs
  • canine flu does NOT infect people

Which dogs should be vaccinated?

  • dogs at highest risk are those with contact with lots of other dogs:  boarding kennels, grooming salons, doggie day care, animal shelters, dog competitions/events, dog parks, etc.
  • snub-nosed breeds and dogs with pre-existing health problems are at highly at risk for developing the severe form of Canine Flu if they are exposed

What can be done to prevent canine influenza cases?

  • infected dogs should be isolated immediately, with a separate air supply
  • canine flu virus is easily killed by common disinfectants; pay particular attention to door knobs and other items people touch commonly
  • wash hands and arms thoroughly after handling an unfamiliar dog, and disinfect shoes after being in a possibly contaminated area
  • the current Canine Influenza virus vaccines reliably prevents Canine Flu:
    • start with 2 vaccines, spaced 2-4 weeks apart, then booster annually
    • for Windmill pets who have received the original flu vaccine, we can booster with just the new strain
K9 FLU VACCINE, BIVALENT, ANNUAL
CANINE INFLUENZA HAS RE-APPEARED, AND IS EPIDEMIC
DIAGNOSED IN 10+ STATES, INCLUDING TEXAS, AND AT LEAST 5 DOGS HAVE DIED

The “original” Canine Influenza:        H3N8   in U.S. since 2004

The “new” Canine Influenza:  H3N2   in U.S. since 2015–current strain causing the epidemic

  • HIGHLY  CONTAGIOUS:
    • spread by contact with respiratory droplets from coughing/sneezing, and other body fluids;
    • unsuspecting pet owners can bring it home on their hands/clothing/shoes and infect their own dogs indirectly!!
    • 3-7 days incubation
  • SYMPTOMS:
    • starts with sneezing, reverse sneezing, “tickling” cough
    • progresses rapidly in less than 24 hours to fever (102 to 105), lethargy, severe cough
    • those with a more severe version develop a very high fever (105+) and hemorrhagic pneumonia (bleeding lungs)–affected dogs require intensive care and many DIE
    • some lucky dogs have subclinical infections–no symptoms at all, but shed the virus in all body fluids for up to 30 days, thereby exposing many unsuspecting dogs and owners
  • WHICH DOGS GET THE MILD FORM AND WHICH DOGS GET SEVERELY ILL?
    • snub-nosed breeds, puppies, elderly dogs, and dogs with chronic health problems are at highest risk of the hemorrhagic pneumonia form of Canine Flu.
    • when a dog has CONCURRENT exposure to multiple respiratory diseases (distemper virus, parainfluenza virus, bordetella, and/or hepatitis virus) at the same time AND/OR a dog has been under stress (boarding, grooming, attending dog shows, etc.), that dog is at HIGH risk of the severe form of Canine Flu
  • TREATMENT:
    • supportive care (antibiotics, fever-reducing medications, fluids) for 2-3 weeks
    • about 10% of dogs with Canine Influenza die as a result of the infection
  • there is a vaccine available for each strain of Canine Influenza, no one knows how much cross-protection occurs
  • canine flu does NOT infect people

Which dogs should be vaccinated?

  • dogs at highest risk are those with contact with lots of other dogs:  boarding kennels, grooming salons, doggie day care, animal shelters, dog competitions/events, dog parks, etc.
  • snub-nosed breeds and dogs with pre-existing health problems are at highly at risk for developing the severe form of Canine Flu if they are exposed

What can be done to prevent canine influenza cases?

  • infected dogs should be isolated immediately, with a separate air supply
  • canine flu virus is easily killed by common disinfectants; pay particular attention to door knobs and other items people touch commonly
  • wash hands and arms thoroughly after handling an unfamiliar dog, and disinfect shoes after being in a possibly contaminated area
  • the current Canine Influenza virus vaccines reliably prevents Canine Flu:
    • start with 2 vaccines, spaced 2-4 weeks apart, then booster annually
    • for Windmill pets who have received the original flu vaccine, we can booster with just the new strain
K9 FLU VACCINE, H3N8 ANNUAL ‘OLD’
CANINE INFLUENZA HAS RE-APPEARED, AND IS EPIDEMIC
DIAGNOSED IN 10+ STATES, INCLUDING TEXAS, AND AT LEAST 5 DOGS HAVE DIED

The “original” Canine Influenza:        H3N8   in U.S. since 2004

The “new” Canine Influenza:  H3N2   in U.S. since 2015–current strain causing the epidemic

  • HIGHLY  CONTAGIOUS:
    • spread by contact with respiratory droplets from coughing/sneezing, and other body fluids;
    • unsuspecting pet owners can bring it home on their hands/clothing/shoes and infect their own dogs indirectly!!
    • 3-7 days incubation
  • SYMPTOMS:
    • starts with sneezing, reverse sneezing, “tickling” cough
    • progresses rapidly in less than 24 hours to fever (102 to 105), lethargy, severe cough
    • those with a more severe version develop a very high fever (105+) and hemorrhagic pneumonia (bleeding lungs)–affected dogs require intensive care and many DIE
    • some lucky dogs have subclinical infections–no symptoms at all, but shed the virus in all body fluids for up to 30 days, thereby exposing many unsuspecting dogs and owners
  • WHICH DOGS GET THE MILD FORM AND WHICH DOGS GET SEVERELY ILL?
    • snub-nosed breeds, puppies, elderly dogs, and dogs with chronic health problems are at highest risk of the hemorrhagic pneumonia form of Canine Flu.
    • when a dog has CONCURRENT exposure to multiple respiratory diseases (distemper virus, parainfluenza virus, bordetella, and/or hepatitis virus) at the same time AND/OR a dog has been under stress (boarding, grooming, attending dog shows, etc.), that dog is at HIGH risk of the severe form of Canine Flu
  • TREATMENT:
    • supportive care (antibiotics, fever-reducing medications, fluids) for 2-3 weeks
    • about 10% of dogs with Canine Influenza die as a result of the infection
  • there is a vaccine available for each strain of Canine Influenza, no one knows how much cross-protection occurs
  • canine flu does NOT infect people

Which dogs should be vaccinated?

  • dogs at highest risk are those with contact with lots of other dogs:  boarding kennels, grooming salons, doggie day care, animal shelters, dog competitions/events, dog parks, etc.
  • snub-nosed breeds and dogs with pre-existing health problems are at highly at risk for developing the severe form of Canine Flu if they are exposed

What can be done to prevent canine influenza cases?

  • infected dogs should be isolated immediately, with a separate air supply
  • canine flu virus is easily killed by common disinfectants; pay particular attention to door knobs and other items people touch commonly
  • wash hands and arms thoroughly after handling an unfamiliar dog, and disinfect shoes after being in a possibly contaminated area
  • the current Canine Influenza virus vaccines reliably prevents Canine Flu:
    • start with 2 vaccines, spaced 2-4 weeks apart, then booster annually
    • for Windmill pets who have received the original flu vaccine, we can booster with just the new strain
LYME DISEASE BOOSTER
Our records indicate it’s time for your dog or puppy to receive its Lyme Disease vaccine. Lyme disease is a clinical disorder caused by a microscopic organism, the spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, and is spread by ticks. Fleas & mosquitoes have also been implicated in the spread of Lyme disease. The ticks normally feed on small mammals, especially mice. Ticks then feed on dogs or people, and carry the bacteria to their victims. The deer tick is the most common tick involved in spreading the disease, although other ticks can pass it along, too. Ticks capable of spreading Lyme disease are most commonly found in the eastern United States, the upper Midwest, Texas and the Pacific Northwest. Lyme disease can affect different organs and body systems. The disease is named because of the initial discovery in human beings that occurred in 1975 in Lyme, Connecticut. Abilene and the general Big Country is a small hot-spot of Lyme disease, as is the Dallas-Fort Worth area, due to the high numbers of ticks in the area, and dogs coming into the area from all over the country.

Lyme disease causes a variety of symptoms in affected dogs, and can be difficult to diagnose. The signs of Lyme disease include recurrent lameness, nonspecific pain, joint swelling, anorexia, unexplained fever, lethargy, depression, and enlarged lymph nodes. If untreated, Lyme disease can cause permanent joint pain and lameness.

High-risk dogs (hunting dogs, herding dogs, ranch dogs, search & rescue dogs, dogs who go camping, etc) as well as “city” dogs who have endured a tick problem should all be vaccinated for Lyme disease.

The doctors of Windmill Animal Hospital recommend administering the Lyme Disease vaccination with the following schedule:

· 14 weeks, 18 weeks of age for all puppies with risk of exposure to ticks
· booster within 1 year
· annually thereafter for all adult dogs with risk of exposure to ticks

LYME DISEASE FIRST VAC

Our records indicate it’s time for your dog or puppy to receive its Lyme Disease vaccine. Lyme disease is a clinical disorder caused by a microscopic organism, the spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, and is spread by ticks. Fleas & mosquitoes have also been implicated in the spread of Lyme disease. The ticks normally feed on small mammals, especially mice. Ticks then feed on dogs or people, and carry the bacteria to their victims. The deer tick is the most common tick involved in spreading the disease, although other ticks can pass it along, too. Ticks capable of spreading Lyme disease are most commonly found in the eastern United States, the upper Midwest, Texas and the Pacific Northwest. Lyme disease can affect different organs and body systems. The disease is named because of the initial discovery in human beings that occurred in 1975 in Lyme, Connecticut. Abilene and the general Big Country is a small hot-spot of Lyme disease, as is the Dallas-Fort Worth area, due to the high numbers of ticks in the area, and dogs coming into the area from all over the country.

Lyme disease causes a variety of symptoms in affected dogs, and can be difficult to diagnose. The signs of Lyme disease include recurrent lameness, nonspecific pain, joint swelling, anorexia, unexplained fever, lethargy, depression, and enlarged lymph nodes. If untreated, Lyme disease can cause permanent joint pain and lameness.

High-risk dogs (hunting dogs, herding dogs, ranch dogs, search & rescue dogs, dogs who go camping, etc) as well as “city” dogs who have endured a tick problem should all be vaccinated for Lyme disease.

The doctors of Windmill Animal Hospital recommend administering the Lyme Disease vaccination with the following schedule:

· 14 weeks, 18 weeks of age for all puppies with risk of exposure to ticks

· booster within 1 year

· annually thereafter for all adult dogs with risk of exposure to ticks

LYME DISEASE SECOND VAC
Our records indicate it’s time for your dog or puppy to receive its Lyme Disease vaccine. Lyme disease is a clinical disorder caused by a microscopic organism, the spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, and is spread by ticks. Fleas & mosquitoes have also been implicated in the spread of Lyme disease. The ticks normally feed on small mammals, especially mice. Ticks then feed on dogs or people, and carry the bacteria to their victims. The deer tick is the most common tick involved in spreading the disease, although other ticks can pass it along, too. Ticks capable of spreading Lyme disease are most commonly found in the eastern United States, the upper Midwest, Texas and the Pacific Northwest. Lyme disease can affect different organs and body systems. The disease is named because of the initial discovery in human beings that occurred in 1975 in Lyme, Connecticut. Abilene and the general Big Country is a small hot-spot of Lyme disease, as is the Dallas-Fort Worth area, due to the high numbers of ticks in the area, and dogs coming into the area from all over the country.

Lyme disease causes a variety of symptoms in affected dogs, and can be difficult to diagnose. The signs of Lyme disease include recurrent lameness, nonspecific pain, joint swelling, anorexia, unexplained fever, lethargy, depression, and enlarged lymph nodes. If untreated, Lyme disease can cause permanent joint pain and lameness.

High-risk dogs (hunting dogs, herding dogs, ranch dogs, search & rescue dogs, dogs who go camping, etc) as well as “city” dogs who have endured a tick problem should all be vaccinated for Lyme disease.

The doctors of Windmill Animal Hospital recommend administering the Lyme Disease vaccination with the following schedule:

· 14 weeks, 18 weeks of age for all puppies with risk of exposure to ticks
· booster within 1 year
· annually thereafter for all adult dogs with risk of exposure to ticks

NEUTER: DOG 1-15LBS/FERRETS/RABBITS
Our records indicate that your puppy or kitten is now old enough to be spayed or neutered. In addition, if your pet has retained baby teeth, this is an ideal time to extract them.

Did you know it is now absolutely normal to spay/neuter healthy puppies and kittens between 4 and 6 months of age? Wouldn’t it be nice to spay your puppy before she came in heat? Wouldn’t it be easier to neuter your kitten before he reached puberty and learned how to spray? We can safely anesthetize very young pets now, with the extraordinarily safe gas anesthetics used at Windmill Animal Hospital. In addition, you don’t have to worry about your furry baby being uncomfortable. Safe, comfortable anesthesia and surgery is the name of the game at Windmill Animal Hospital, especially for puppies and kittens. In fact, it is our hospital policy that ALL pets who have surgery receive pre-anesthetic, peri-anesthetic, and post-anesthetic pain control. In addition, our surgical patients go home with up a week of oral pain control medication.

At Windmill Animal Hospital, we recommend that all healthy female dogs be spayed between 5 and 6 months of age. Truth be told, there’s absolutely no need for your female dog to ever have a heat cycle or to have puppies before spaying. Years ago, it was thought a female dog needed to have a litter of puppies to “settle her down,” and help her to be a better pet. . Some very elegant behavioral studies have shown that dogs spayed after having a litter, versus those spayed before reaching puberty, have no significant differences in their behavior and loving temperament.

A huge benefit to early spaying is virtually eliminating your female dog’s risk of developing breast cancer. Dogs get breast cancer 25 times more often than us humans. Dogs spayed before their first heat have a 99% reduced risk of contracting breast cancer. Dogs spayed after their first heat, but before their second heat, have a 95% reduction in their breast cancer risk. Dogs spayed after their second heat have no significant reduction in their risk.

Other benefits to early spaying include faster recovery time for the dog and reduced cost for the owner.

At Windmill Animal Hospital, we also recommend that all healthy male dogs be neutered between 5 and 6 months of age. Neutering a male dog before puberty helps prevent testosterone-related behavior problems, such as hiking the leg in the house, mounting behavior, aggression and inappropriate protectiveness. If your male dog has a retained testicle, it is absolutely critical he be neutered as soon as possible–the retained testicle has a 50% chance of become cancerous by the time he’s two years old.

Many owners don’t realize that their adult male dog can develop serious health problems as he gets older from being unneutered. Did you know male dogs can get 3 different kinds of testicular tumors? The only way to prevent them is through neutering. Also, by the time an intact male dog is 5 years old, he has a 75% chance of having an enlarged prostate gland. By the time he’s 7 years old, his risk is over 90%. Enlarged prostates cause the dog to have to work harder to pass stool. In addition, the dog with an enlarged prostate is at high risk of developing prostatitis, a painful infection of the prostate that can be as life-threatening as appendicitis in humans. The treatment for enlarged prostate, and the only way to prevent enlarged prostate, is neutering.

A commonly-seen dental issue with puppies, especially toy breeds, is retention of baby teeth. These retained baby teeth commonly deflect the normal alignment of the puppy’s permanent teeth, and can cause chronic pain due to malocclusions. Most puppies have erupted their permanent teeth by 5-6 months of age, so any retained baby teeth at that time will need to be manually extracted. Spaying or neutering puppies at 5-6 months of age is the perfect time to extract any retained baby teeth, thereby avoiding 2 anesthetic procedures and the additional cost associated with them.

Call Windmill Animal Hospital for details about early spay or neuter services for your pet!

Newgard chewables 60.1-121.0 lbs 6 pack
BRAVECTO 90-DAY CHEWABLE FLEA & TICK CONTROL TABLETS

Bravecto is the FIRST oral chew to deliver flea and tick protection for up to 12 full weeks. It provides consistent, broad-spectrum, and long-lasting efficacy against both fleas and ticks. Bravecto is also amazingly safe: the FDA has approved Bravecto for use in breeding, pregnant and nursing dogs.

Because of Bravecto’s proven 90-day efficacy and safety, the Doctors of Windmill Animal Hospital have discontinued prescribing Nexgard monthly chewable flea & tick control tablets.

Dog owners love only having to give 4 chewable tablets a year for complete flea and tick prevention! Even better, Bravecto won’t wash off, cause a mess or smell like a topical product will. It gets even better, though: Bravecto is significantly cheaper to use than monthly Nexgard chewable tablets or monthly topical products!!

Bravecto kills 100% of newly arriving fleas within 24 hours for 12 weeks. Even better, Bravecto kills fleas so quickly that most flea-allergic dogs have little or no flea allergy dermatitis after a flea exposure. Bravecto starts killing fleas within 2 hours and kills 100% of fleas within 12 hours after treatment.

Bravecto kills 4 tick species: Ixodes scapularis (black-legged tick), Dermacentor variabilis (American dog tick), and Rhipicephalus sanguineus (brown dog tick) for 12 weeks, and Amblyomma americanum (lone star tick) for 8 weeks. Due to Bravecto’s rapid onset of action and speed of kill, ticks seldom have time to engorge or transmit disease.

Bravecto is available by veterinary prescription only, for dogs and puppies at least 6 months of age and 4.4 lbs weight.

Nexgard chewables 10.1-24.0 lbs 6 pack
BRAVECTO 90-DAY CHEWABLE FLEA & TICK CONTROL TABLETS

Bravecto is the FIRST oral chew to deliver flea and tick protection for up to 12 full weeks. It provides consistent, broad-spectrum, and long-lasting efficacy against both fleas and ticks. Bravecto is also amazingly safe: the FDA has approved Bravecto for use in breeding, pregnant and nursing dogs.

Because of Bravecto’s proven 90-day efficacy and safety, the Doctors of Windmill Animal Hospital have discontinued prescribing Nexgard monthly chewable flea & tick control tablets.

Dog owners love only having to give 4 chewable tablets a year for complete flea and tick prevention! Even better, Bravecto won’t wash off, cause a mess or smell like a topical product will. It gets even better, though: Bravecto is significantly cheaper to use than monthly Nexgard chewable tablets or monthly topical products!!

Bravecto kills 100% of newly arriving fleas within 24 hours for 12 weeks. Even better, Bravecto kills fleas so quickly that most flea-allergic dogs have little or no flea allergy dermatitis after a flea exposure. Bravecto starts killing fleas within 2 hours and kills 100% of fleas within 12 hours after treatment.

Bravecto kills 4 tick species: Ixodes scapularis (black-legged tick), Dermacentor variabilis (American dog tick), and Rhipicephalus sanguineus (brown dog tick) for 12 weeks, and Amblyomma americanum (lone star tick) for 8 weeks. Due to Bravecto’s rapid onset of action and speed of kill, ticks seldom have time to engorge or transmit disease.

Bravecto is available by veterinary prescription only, for dogs and puppies at least 6 months of age and 4.4 lbs weight.

Nexgard chewables 10.1-24.0 lbs, single
BRAVECTO 90-DAY CHEWABLE FLEA & TICK CONTROL TABLETS

Bravecto is the FIRST oral chew to deliver flea and tick protection for up to 12 full weeks. It provides consistent, broad-spectrum, and long-lasting efficacy against both fleas and ticks. Bravecto is also amazingly safe: the FDA has approved Bravecto for use in breeding, pregnant and nursing dogs.

Because of Bravecto’s proven 90-day efficacy and safety, the Doctors of Windmill Animal Hospital have discontinued prescribing Nexgard monthly chewable flea & tick control tablets.

Dog owners love only having to give 4 chewable tablets a year for complete flea and tick prevention! Even better, Bravecto won’t wash off, cause a mess or smell like a topical product will. It gets even better, though: Bravecto is significantly cheaper to use than monthly Nexgard chewable tablets or monthly topical products!!

Bravecto kills 100% of newly arriving fleas within 24 hours for 12 weeks. Even better, Bravecto kills fleas so quickly that most flea-allergic dogs have little or no flea allergy dermatitis after a flea exposure. Bravecto starts killing fleas within 2 hours and kills 100% of fleas within 12 hours after treatment.

Bravecto kills 4 tick species: Ixodes scapularis (black-legged tick), Dermacentor variabilis (American dog tick), and Rhipicephalus sanguineus (brown dog tick) for 12 weeks, and Amblyomma americanum (lone star tick) for 8 weeks. Due to Bravecto’s rapid onset of action and speed of kill, ticks seldom have time to engorge or transmit disease.

Bravecto is available by veterinary prescription only, for dogs and puppies at least 6 months of age and 4.4 lbs weight.

Nexgard chewables 24.1-60.0 lbs 6 pack
BRAVECTO 90-DAY CHEWABLE FLEA & TICK CONTROL TABLETS

Bravecto is the FIRST oral chew to deliver flea and tick protection for up to 12 full weeks. It provides consistent, broad-spectrum, and long-lasting efficacy against both fleas and ticks. Bravecto is also amazingly safe: the FDA has approved Bravecto for use in breeding, pregnant and nursing dogs.

Because of Bravecto’s proven 90-day efficacy and safety, the Doctors of Windmill Animal Hospital have discontinued prescribing Nexgard monthly chewable flea & tick control tablets.

Dog owners love only having to give 4 chewable tablets a year for complete flea and tick prevention! Even better, Bravecto won’t wash off, cause a mess or smell like a topical product will. It gets even better, though: Bravecto is significantly cheaper to use than monthly Nexgard chewable tablets or monthly topical products!!

Bravecto kills 100% of newly arriving fleas within 24 hours for 12 weeks. Even better, Bravecto kills fleas so quickly that most flea-allergic dogs have little or no flea allergy dermatitis after a flea exposure. Bravecto starts killing fleas within 2 hours and kills 100% of fleas within 12 hours after treatment.

Bravecto kills 4 tick species: Ixodes scapularis (black-legged tick), Dermacentor variabilis (American dog tick), and Rhipicephalus sanguineus (brown dog tick) for 12 weeks, and Amblyomma americanum (lone star tick) for 8 weeks. Due to Bravecto’s rapid onset of action and speed of kill, ticks seldom have time to engorge or transmit disease.

Bravecto is available by veterinary prescription only, for dogs and puppies at least 6 months of age and 4.4 lbs weight.

Nexgard chewables 24.1-60.0 lbs, single
BRAVECTO 90-DAY CHEWABLE FLEA & TICK CONTROL TABLETS

Bravecto is the FIRST oral chew to deliver flea and tick protection for up to 12 full weeks. It provides consistent, broad-spectrum, and long-lasting efficacy against both fleas and ticks. Bravecto is also amazingly safe: the FDA has approved Bravecto for use in breeding, pregnant and nursing dogs.

Because of Bravecto’s proven 90-day efficacy and safety, the Doctors of Windmill Animal Hospital have discontinued prescribing Nexgard monthly chewable flea & tick control tablets.

Dog owners love only having to give 4 chewable tablets a year for complete flea and tick prevention! Even better, Bravecto won’t wash off, cause a mess or smell like a topical product will. It gets even better, though: Bravecto is significantly cheaper to use than monthly Nexgard chewable tablets or monthly topical products!!

Bravecto kills 100% of newly arriving fleas within 24 hours for 12 weeks. Even better, Bravecto kills fleas so quickly that most flea-allergic dogs have little or no flea allergy dermatitis after a flea exposure. Bravecto starts killing fleas within 2 hours and kills 100% of fleas within 12 hours after treatment.

Bravecto kills 4 tick species: Ixodes scapularis (black-legged tick), Dermacentor variabilis (American dog tick), and Rhipicephalus sanguineus (brown dog tick) for 12 weeks, and Amblyomma americanum (lone star tick) for 8 weeks. Due to Bravecto’s rapid onset of action and speed of kill, ticks seldom have time to engorge or transmit disease.

Bravecto is available by veterinary prescription only, for dogs and puppies at least 6 months of age and 4.4 lbs weight.

Nexgard chewables 4-10 lbs 6 pack
BRAVECTO 90-DAY CHEWABLE FLEA & TICK CONTROL TABLETS

Bravecto is the FIRST oral chew to deliver flea and tick protection for up to 12 full weeks. It provides consistent, broad-spectrum, and long-lasting efficacy against both fleas and ticks. Bravecto is also amazingly safe: the FDA has approved Bravecto for use in breeding, pregnant and nursing dogs.

Because of Bravecto’s proven 90-day efficacy and safety, the Doctors of Windmill Animal Hospital have discontinued prescribing Nexgard monthly chewable flea & tick control tablets.

Dog owners love only having to give 4 chewable tablets a year for complete flea and tick prevention! Even better, Bravecto won’t wash off, cause a mess or smell like a topical product will. It gets even better, though: Bravecto is significantly cheaper to use than monthly Nexgard chewable tablets or monthly topical products!!

Bravecto kills 100% of newly arriving fleas within 24 hours for 12 weeks. Even better, Bravecto kills fleas so quickly that most flea-allergic dogs have little or no flea allergy dermatitis after a flea exposure. Bravecto starts killing fleas within 2 hours and kills 100% of fleas within 12 hours after treatment.

Bravecto kills 4 tick species: Ixodes scapularis (black-legged tick), Dermacentor variabilis (American dog tick), and Rhipicephalus sanguineus (brown dog tick) for 12 weeks, and Amblyomma americanum (lone star tick) for 8 weeks. Due to Bravecto’s rapid onset of action and speed of kill, ticks seldom have time to engorge or transmit disease.

Bravecto is available by veterinary prescription only, for dogs and puppies at least 6 months of age and 4.4 lbs weight.

Nexgard chewables 4-10 lbs, single
BRAVECTO 90-DAY CHEWABLE FLEA & TICK CONTROL TABLETS

Bravecto is the FIRST oral chew to deliver flea and tick protection for up to 12 full weeks. It provides consistent, broad-spectrum, and long-lasting efficacy against both fleas and ticks. Bravecto is also amazingly safe: the FDA has approved Bravecto for use in breeding, pregnant and nursing dogs.

Because of Bravecto’s proven 90-day efficacy and safety, the Doctors of Windmill Animal Hospital have discontinued prescribing Nexgard monthly chewable flea & tick control tablets.

Dog owners love only having to give 4 chewable tablets a year for complete flea and tick prevention! Even better, Bravecto won’t wash off, cause a mess or smell like a topical product will. It gets even better, though: Bravecto is significantly cheaper to use than monthly Nexgard chewable tablets or monthly topical products!!

Bravecto kills 100% of newly arriving fleas within 24 hours for 12 weeks. Even better, Bravecto kills fleas so quickly that most flea-allergic dogs have little or no flea allergy dermatitis after a flea exposure. Bravecto starts killing fleas within 2 hours and kills 100% of fleas within 12 hours after treatment.

Bravecto kills 4 tick species: Ixodes scapularis (black-legged tick), Dermacentor variabilis (American dog tick), and Rhipicephalus sanguineus (brown dog tick) for 12 weeks, and Amblyomma americanum (lone star tick) for 8 weeks. Due to Bravecto’s rapid onset of action and speed of kill, ticks seldom have time to engorge or transmit disease.

Bravecto is available by veterinary prescription only, for dogs and puppies at least 6 months of age and 4.4 lbs weight.

Nexgard chewables 60.1-121.0 lbs, single
BRAVECTO 90-DAY CHEWABLE FLEA & TICK CONTROL TABLETS

Bravecto is the FIRST oral chew to deliver flea and tick protection for up to 12 full weeks. It provides consistent, broad-spectrum, and long-lasting efficacy against both fleas and ticks. Bravecto is also amazingly safe: the FDA has approved Bravecto for use in breeding, pregnant and nursing dogs.

Because of Bravecto’s proven 90-day efficacy and safety, the Doctors of Windmill Animal Hospital have discontinued prescribing Nexgard monthly chewable flea & tick control tablets.

Dog owners love only having to give 4 chewable tablets a year for complete flea and tick prevention! Even better, Bravecto won’t wash off, cause a mess or smell like a topical product will. It gets even better, though: Bravecto is significantly cheaper to use than monthly Nexgard chewable tablets or monthly topical products!!

Bravecto kills 100% of newly arriving fleas within 24 hours for 12 weeks. Even better, Bravecto kills fleas so quickly that most flea-allergic dogs have little or no flea allergy dermatitis after a flea exposure. Bravecto starts killing fleas within 2 hours and kills 100% of fleas within 12 hours after treatment.

Bravecto kills 4 tick species: Ixodes scapularis (black-legged tick), Dermacentor variabilis (American dog tick), and Rhipicephalus sanguineus (brown dog tick) for 12 weeks, and Amblyomma americanum (lone star tick) for 8 weeks. Due to Bravecto’s rapid onset of action and speed of kill, ticks seldom have time to engorge or transmit disease.

Bravecto is available by veterinary prescription only, for dogs and puppies at least 6 months of age and 4.4 lbs weight.

PARVOVIRUS FOURTH VAC
Your puppy is due for its 4th Parvovirus vaccination. Canine Parvovirus Enteritis is a highly contagious and usually fatal viral infection of the digestive tract. It causes severe vomiting and foul, bloody diarrhea. Parvo first appeared in 1978; it was a dreaded scourge of all dog owners and breeders until reliable vaccines were developed in the late 1980′s.

Parvo presents a unique difficulty with regards to getting puppies protected against it: like all mammals, puppies receive protective antibodies from their mothers in the colostrum, or first milk, that they receive in the first 48 hours of life. These antibodies last anywhere from 6-16 weeks. Most maternal antibodies do not interfere with a puppy’s response to vaccination; however, unfortunately, maternal Parvovirus antibodies will effectively block a puppy’s vaccine response. As long as a puppy has high levels of maternal Parvovirus antibodies circulating in its bloodstream, the puppy WON’T be able to make its OWN antibodies to Parvovirus. Since the maternal Parvovirus antibodies wear off when anywhere from 6 to 16 weeks after birth, puppies need to receive FOUR Parvovirus vaccinations: 6 weeks, 10 weeks, 14 weeks, and 18 weeks. With such a vaccine program, you can be assured that your puppy will be properly protected against this dreaded disease!

PCV/SERUM PROTEIN COMBO ASSAY
Our records show that it’s time to perform a PCV/Serum Protein Combo assay for your dog. Adult dogs should periodically have their health assessed by diagnostic surveillance tests. The PCV/Serum Protein Combo assay is ideal for the young adult dog, who seldom has major problems with the internal organs, therefore not needing a major health assessment like a senior pet. “PCV” stands for Packed Cell Volume; this is also called “Hematocrit” in human medicine. Serum protein is composed of the proteins produced by the liver, as well as the circulating antibodies produced by the immune system.

A PCV/Serum Protein Combo assay is a minor diagnostic test that requires only a few drops of your dog’s blood, but gives several valuable pieces of information. It evaluates your dog for anemia, for abnormal white blood cell count, for jaundice (a common indicator of liver problems), for hyperlipemia (excess fat or cholesterol in the bloodstream), and for dehydration through measuring the serum protein levels. Quite a bit of information for just a few drops of blood!

The PCV/Serum Protein combo is performed on-site in the Windmill Animal Hospital laboratory. The blood is placed inside a tiny tube, called a microhematocrit tube. It is then spun in a high-speed centrifuge for 5 minutes. This causes the blood to separate into red blood cells and serum. Using a special grid and a refractometer, we can then accurately measure your dog’s PCV and Serum Protein. Results are generally available within 7 minutes of acquiring the blood sample.

We recommend the PCV/Serum Protein Combo Assay annually in adult dogs 1-6 years of age. Dogs are considered seniors at age 7, which is when more in-depth health assessments should be performed annually.

PET DUE FOR GERIATRIC WORK-UP!
Our records show your pet is due for some diagnostic laboratory blood tests. These tests fall into 4 categories:

  1. Your pet’s previous lab work (such as a pre-anesthetic profile associated with an routine surgical procedure, or bloodwork associated with an illness your pet endured, or a previous urinary tract infection), revealed a POSSIBLE problem. You are being sent this reminder to alert you that it’s time to recheck your pet’s lab work, to verify that there IS or IS NOT a concern with your pet’s internal health. Abnormalities in lab work that commonly show up that need to be double-checked include elevated kidney values, elevated liver values, elevated white blood cell counts, depressed platelet counts, urinary tract infections/crystals, etc. Rechecking your pet’s lab work will indicate whether the abnormality has resolved, or will need to be managed in future.
  2. Your pet has been diagnosed with a chronic medical ailment, such as diabetes or compromised kidney function, and the values need a routine recheck. Routine rechecks, usually twice a year, are critical to proper management of your pet’s chronic health problem, to insure proper management and optimum comfort and longevity for your pet.
  3. Your pet is on long-term anticonvulsant medications, such as phenobarbital or potassium bromide, or is on hormonal supplementation, such as for low thyroid, or is on long-term Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammtant drugs for chronic pain. Serum anticonvulsant medication levels MUST be checked at least annually, as well as a Complete Blood Count and a General Chemistry Panel. If the levels get too low, therefore, ineffective, your pet will start seizing again. If the levels get too high, the anticonvulsant drug becomes dangerous, toxic, and could induce the very seizures it is designed to prevent. The only way to know if the dose of anticonvulsant is correct is to check the serum levels. The only way to make sure the anticonvulsant isn’t causing problems with your pet’s internal organ health is to do blood work. Thyroid and other hormone supplementation must also be checked at least annually–if the dose is too low, your pet will receive no benefit and you will waste your time and money; if the dose is too high, your pet’s health could be seriously harmed. NonSteroidal Anti-Inflammatant Drugs (known as NSAIDs) do a very good job of relieving pain, but they ALL can cause digestive upset, they ALL put stress on the liver, and they ALL lower blood pressure to the kidneys. Therefore, pets on long-term NSAIDs MUST have their liver & kidney health checked at least every 6 months, as well as a complete blod count to verify no chronic blood loss through GIT inflammation.
  4. Your pet is 8 years of age or older, and needs routine blood screens to verify normal internal organ health. All senior pets (8 years +), and, especially geriatric pets (10 years +), should have their internal health assessed via blood work at least annually. The earlier a developing problem is detected, the easier and less expensive it is to manage.

Windmill Animal Hospital has extensive in-house lab test capability; we are able to process most of our patients’ lab testing needs right here at our hospital. This means fast turn-around, and accurate results for you, our client!

Please call or email us today, to discuss your pet’s lab work needs, and get an appointment scheduled.

PRE-ANESTHETIC BLOOD PROFILE
A detailed report of this reminder is under construction. Please call us at 325-698-VETS (8387) for information about your pet’s reminder.
RABIES CANINE 3 YEAR BOOSTER
Our records indicate it’s time for your pet to receive its Rabies vaccine. For most people, hearing the word rabies strikes great fear. With Hollywood portrayals such as “Cujo,” and the inevitably lethal result of a rabies infection, these fears are somewhat justified. But with understanding and knowledge, fears can be replaced with a healthy respect for the virus.

The rabies virus can infect almost any mammal, INCLUDING HUMANS. It is shed in the saliva and transmitted typically by bite wounds. Without treatment, the virus eventually attacks the nervous system and results in death. Throughout the world, 35,000 people die each year from rabies. In the United States, about 3 people succumb each year to rabies.

In the United States, rabies is most commonly found in skunks, raccoons, foxes, coyotes and bats.

Recently in the United States, cats have become the number one domestic animal diagnosed with rabies. It is suspected this is due to more cats being kept as pets and allowed to roam their neighborhoods.

Vaccinating our pets is the best way to protect us from exposure to Rabies. Texas law requires ALL puppies, kittens and ferets to receive their first Rabies vaccination between 3 and 4 months of age. This initial vaccination must be repeated within one year. After that, your cats and dogs may be re-vaccinated every 1, 2 or 3 years, depending upon the laws in your community, and what Rabies vaccine your veterinarian used. Ferrets must be re-vaccinated annually.

The doctors of Windmill Animal Hospital use exclusively 3-year-licensed Rabies vaccines for all their canine patients.

Cats present a unique challenge, due to some health concerns found only in felines. Some cats (approximately 1 in 30,000) have an immune system that has a familial tendency to react to vaccines inappropriately. In these cats, the vaccine site is chronically inflamed post-vaccine, which can develop into a tumor. Because of this, the only Rabies vaccine for cats used at Windmill Animal Hospital is the adjuvant-free vaccine, PureVax. This vaccine is licensed to be given annually.

Ferrets must receive Rabies vaccine approved for use in ferrets between 3 & 4 months of age, and annually thereafter.

RABIES FELINE PUREVAX 3 YEAR
Our records indicate it’s time for your pet to receive its Rabies vaccine. For most people, hearing the word rabies strikes great fear. With Hollywood portrayals such as “Cujo,” and the inevitably lethal result of a rabies infection, these fears are somewhat justified. But with understanding and knowledge, fears can be replaced with a healthy respect for the virus.

The rabies virus can infect almost any mammal, INCLUDING HUMANS. It is shed in the saliva and transmitted typically by bite wounds. Without treatment, the virus eventually attacks the nervous system and results in death. Throughout the world, 35,000 people die each year from rabies. In the United States, about 3 people succumb each year to rabies.

In the United States, rabies is most commonly found in skunks, raccoons, foxes, coyotes and bats.

Recently in the United States, cats have become the number one domestic animal diagnosed with rabies. It is suspected this is due to more cats being kept as pets and allowed to roam their neighborhoods.

Vaccinating our pets is the best way to protect us from exposure to Rabies. Texas law requires ALL puppies, kittens and ferets to receive their first Rabies vaccination between 3 and 4 months of age. This initial vaccination must be repeated within one year. After that, your cats and dogs may be re-vaccinated every 1, 2 or 3 years, depending upon the laws in your community, and what Rabies vaccine your veterinarian used. Ferrets must be re-vaccinated annually.

The doctors of Windmill Animal Hospital use exclusively 3-year-licensed Rabies vaccines for all their canine patients.

Cats present a unique challenge, due to some health concerns found only in felines. Some cats (approximately 1 in 30,000) have an immune system that has a familial tendency to react to vaccines inappropriately. In these cats, the vaccine site is chronically inflamed post-vaccine, which can develop into a tumor. Because of this, the only Rabies vaccine for cats used at Windmill Animal Hospital is the adjuvant-free vaccine, PureVax. This vaccine is licensed to be given annually.

Ferrets must receive Rabies vaccine approved for use in ferrets between 3 & 4 months of age, and annually thereafter.

RABIES FELINE PUREVAX, 1 YEAR
Our records indicate it’s time for your pet to receive its Rabies vaccine. For most people, hearing the word rabies strikes great fear. With Hollywood portrayals such as “Cujo,” and the inevitably lethal result of a rabies infection, these fears are somewhat justified. But with understanding and knowledge, fears can be replaced with a healthy respect for the virus.

The rabies virus can infect almost any mammal, INCLUDING HUMANS. It is shed in the saliva and transmitted typically by bite wounds. Without treatment, the virus eventually attacks the nervous system and results in death. Throughout the world, 35,000 people die each year from rabies. In the United States, about 3 people succumb each year to rabies.

In the United States, rabies is most commonly found in skunks, raccoons, foxes, coyotes and bats.

Recently in the United States, cats have become the number one domestic animal diagnosed with rabies. It is suspected this is due to more cats being kept as pets and allowed to roam their neighborhoods.

Vaccinating our pets is the best way to protect us from exposure to Rabies. Texas law requires ALL puppies, kittens and ferets to receive their first Rabies vaccination between 3 and 4 months of age. This initial vaccination must be repeated within one year. After that, your cats and dogs may be re-vaccinated every 1, 2 or 3 years, depending upon the laws in your community, and what Rabies vaccine your veterinarian used. Ferrets must be re-vaccinated annually.

The doctors of Windmill Animal Hospital use exclusively 3-year-licensed Rabies vaccines for all their canine patients.

Cats present a unique challenge, due to some health concerns found only in felines. Some cats (approximately 1 in 30,000) have an immune system that has a familial tendency to react to vaccines inappropriately. In these cats, the vaccine site is chronically inflamed post-vaccine, which can develop into a tumor. Because of this, the only Rabies vaccine for cats used at Windmill Animal Hospital is the adjuvant-free vaccine, PureVax. This vaccine is licensed to be given annually.

Ferrets must receive Rabies vaccine approved for use in ferrets between 3 & 4 months of age, and annually thereafter.

RABIES VACCINE–CANINE, 1 YEAR
Our records indicate it’s time for your pet to receive its Rabies vaccine. For most people, hearing the word rabies strikes great fear. With Hollywood portrayals such as “Cujo,” and the inevitably lethal result of a rabies infection, these fears are somewhat justified. But with understanding and knowledge, fears can be replaced with a healthy respect for the virus.

The rabies virus can infect almost any mammal, INCLUDING HUMANS. It is shed in the saliva and transmitted typically by bite wounds. Without treatment, the virus eventually attacks the nervous system and results in death. Throughout the world, 35,000 people die each year from rabies. In the United States, about 3 people succumb each year to rabies.

In the United States, rabies is most commonly found in skunks, raccoons, foxes, coyotes and bats.

Recently in the United States, cats have become the number one domestic animal diagnosed with rabies. It is suspected this is due to more cats being kept as pets and allowed to roam their neighborhoods.

Vaccinating our pets is the best way to protect us from exposure to Rabies. Texas law requires ALL puppies, kittens and ferets to receive their first Rabies vaccination between 3 and 4 months of age. This initial vaccination must be repeated within one year. After that, your cats and dogs may be re-vaccinated every 1, 2 or 3 years, depending upon the laws in your community, and what Rabies vaccine your veterinarian used. Ferrets must be re-vaccinated annually.

The doctors of Windmill Animal Hospital use exclusively 3-year-licensed Rabies vaccines for all their canine patients.

Cats present a unique challenge, due to some health concerns found only in felines. Some cats (approximately 1 in 30,000) have an immune system that has a familial tendency to react to vaccines inappropriately. In these cats, the vaccine site is chronically inflamed post-vaccine, which can develop into a tumor. Because of this, the only Rabies vaccine for cats used at Windmill Animal Hospital is the adjuvant-free vaccine, PureVax. This vaccine is licensed to be given annually.

Ferrets must receive Rabies vaccine approved for use in ferrets between 3 & 4 months of age, and annually thereafter.

RABIES VACCINE–CANINE, INITIAL
Our records indicate it’s time for your pet to receive its Rabies vaccine. For most people, hearing the word rabies strikes great fear. With Hollywood portrayals such as “Cujo,” and the inevitably lethal result of a rabies infection, these fears are somewhat justified. But with understanding and knowledge, fears can be replaced with a healthy respect for the virus.

The rabies virus can infect almost any mammal, INCLUDING HUMANS. It is shed in the saliva and transmitted typically by bite wounds. Without treatment, the virus eventually attacks the nervous system and results in death. Throughout the world, 35,000 people die each year from rabies. In the United States, about 3 people succumb each year to rabies.

In the United States, rabies is most commonly found in skunks, raccoons, foxes, coyotes and bats.

Recently in the United States, cats have become the number one domestic animal diagnosed with rabies. It is suspected this is due to more cats being kept as pets and allowed to roam their neighborhoods.

Vaccinating our pets is the best way to protect us from exposure to Rabies. Texas law requires ALL puppies, kittens and ferets to receive their first Rabies vaccination between 3 and 4 months of age. This initial vaccination must be repeated within one year. After that, your cats and dogs may be re-vaccinated every 1, 2 or 3 years, depending upon the laws in your community, and what Rabies vaccine your veterinarian used. Ferrets must be re-vaccinated annually.

The doctors of Windmill Animal Hospital use exclusively 3-year-licensed Rabies vaccines for all their canine patients.

Cats present a unique challenge, due to some health concerns found only in felines. Some cats (approximately 1 in 30,000) have an immune system that has a familial tendency to react to vaccines inappropriately. In these cats, the vaccine site is chronically inflamed post-vaccine, which can develop into a tumor. Because of this, the only Rabies vaccine for cats used at Windmill Animal Hospital is the adjuvant-free vaccine, PureVax. This vaccine is licensed to be given annually.

Ferrets must receive Rabies vaccine approved for use in ferrets between 3 & 4 months of age, and annually thereafter.

RABIES VACCINE–FELINE, INITIAL
Our records indicate it’s time for your pet to receive its Rabies vaccine. For most people, hearing the word rabies strikes great fear. With Hollywood portrayals such as “Cujo,” and the inevitably lethal result of a rabies infection, these fears are somewhat justified. But with understanding and knowledge, fears can be replaced with a healthy respect for the virus.

The rabies virus can infect almost any mammal, INCLUDING HUMANS. It is shed in the saliva and transmitted typically by bite wounds. Without treatment, the virus eventually attacks the nervous system and results in death. Throughout the world, 35,000 people die each year from rabies. In the United States, about 3 people succumb each year to rabies.

In the United States, rabies is most commonly found in skunks, raccoons, foxes, coyotes and bats.

Recently in the United States, cats have become the number one domestic animal diagnosed with rabies. It is suspected this is due to more cats being kept as pets and allowed to roam their neighborhoods.

Vaccinating our pets is the best way to protect us from exposure to Rabies. Texas law requires ALL puppies, kittens and ferets to receive their first Rabies vaccination between 3 and 4 months of age. This initial vaccination must be repeated within one year. After that, your cats and dogs may be re-vaccinated every 1, 2 or 3 years, depending upon the laws in your community, and what Rabies vaccine your veterinarian used. Ferrets must be re-vaccinated annually.

The doctors of Windmill Animal Hospital use exclusively 3-year-licensed Rabies vaccines for all their canine patients.

Cats present a unique challenge, due to some health concerns found only in felines. Some cats (approximately 1 in 30,000) have an immune system that has a familial tendency to react to vaccines inappropriately. In these cats, the vaccine site is chronically inflamed post-vaccine, which can develop into a tumor. Because of this, the only Rabies vaccine for cats used at Windmill Animal Hospital is the adjuvant-free vaccine, PureVax. This vaccine is licensed to be given annually.

Ferrets must receive Rabies vaccine approved for use in ferrets between 3 & 4 months of age, and annually thereafter.

RABIES VACCINE-FERRET
Our records indicate it’s time for your pet to receive its Rabies vaccine. For most people, hearing the word rabies strikes great fear. With Hollywood portrayals such as “Cujo,” and the inevitably lethal result of a rabies infection, these fears are somewhat justified. But with understanding and knowledge, fears can be replaced with a healthy respect for the virus.

The rabies virus can infect almost any mammal, INCLUDING HUMANS. It is shed in the saliva and transmitted typically by bite wounds. Without treatment, the virus eventually attacks the nervous system and results in death. Throughout the world, 35,000 people die each year from rabies. In the United States, about 3 people succumb each year to rabies.

In the United States, rabies is most commonly found in skunks, raccoons, foxes, coyotes and bats.

Recently in the United States, cats have become the number one domestic animal diagnosed with rabies. It is suspected this is due to more cats being kept as pets and allowed to roam their neighborhoods.

Vaccinating our pets is the best way to protect us from exposure to Rabies. Texas law requires ALL puppies, kittens and ferets to receive their first Rabies vaccination between 3 and 4 months of age. This initial vaccination must be repeated within one year. After that, your cats and dogs may be re-vaccinated every 1, 2 or 3 years, depending upon the laws in your community, and what Rabies vaccine your veterinarian used. Ferrets must be re-vaccinated annually.

The doctors of Windmill Animal Hospital use exclusively 3-year-licensed Rabies vaccines for all their canine patients.

Cats present a unique challenge, due to some health concerns found only in felines. Some cats (approximately 1 in 30,000) have an immune system that has a familial tendency to react to vaccines inappropriately. In these cats, the vaccine site is chronically inflamed post-vaccine, which can develop into a tumor. Because of this, the only Rabies vaccine for cats used at Windmill Animal Hospital is the adjuvant-free vaccine, PureVax. This vaccine is licensed to be given annually.

Ferrets must receive Rabies vaccine approved for use in ferrets between 3 & 4 months of age, and annually thereafter.

RATTLESNAKE VACCINE SEMIANNUAL
Our Records show it’s time for your pet to receive a Rattlesnake vaccine.
Rattlesnake2
Rattlesnake vaccine is a relatively new product recently approved for use throughout the United States. Ranchers and veterinarians have long known that after having been repeatedly bitten, dogs become resistant to rattlesnake bites. Vaccination works the same way – it will make your dog resistant but not immune. A vaccinated dog is much less likely to suffer permanent injury or die from rattlesnake bite, but it is still possible.

The vaccine is usually administered as two (for dogs > 25 lbs) or three (dogs < 25 lbs) injections the first year, with a booster each year after that (although some dogs warrant a booster twice per year – your veterinarian will discuss your dog’s needs with you).

Every dog living in the Big Country is at risk of running into a rattlesnake. If you live where rattlesnakes are being seen, or if your dog goes hunting, herding, camping, to the barn, lives on a ranch, etc., vaccination is critically important.

Rattlesnake strikes on dogs usually involve their head/neck or front feet. Unvaccinated dogs struck on the head or face can swell so severely that they suffocate before ever getting to the veterinary hospital for treatment. Those unvaccinated dogs fortunate enough to survive the initial snake strike can slough, or lose, huge areas of skin, leaving gaping wounds requiring months of hydrotherapy and additional surgeries to close. On the other hand, vaccinated dogs generally have dramatically reduced mortality, swelling, hospitalization time, and skin slough; it is commonly unnecessary to use antivenin with vaccinated dogs. Rattlesnake vaccinations have got to have one of the best returns on investment of any preventative care known to veterinary medicine!

Rattlesnake antivenin (not vaccine) is made from the blood serum of hyper immunized horses. A single dose of antivenin can make dogs so sensitive to horse serum that a subsequent dose of antivenin is rapidly fatal. This means that if your antivenin-treated dog gets struck by a rattler again, his treatment options are highly limited. If your dog has already been treated with antivenin, immunizing your dog with Rattlesnake vaccine eliminates the risk from additional antivenin by eliminating the need for antivenin.

RATTLESNAKE VACCINE, K9, 1ST
Our Records show it’s time for your pet to receive a Rattlesnake vaccine.
Rattlesnake2
Rattlesnake vaccine is a relatively new product recently approved for use throughout the United States. Ranchers and veterinarians have long known that after having been repeatedly bitten, dogs become resistant to rattlesnake bites. Vaccination works the same way – it will make your dog resistant but not immune. A vaccinated dog is much less likely to suffer permanent injury or die from rattlesnake bite, but it is still possible.

The vaccine is usually administered as two (for dogs > 25 lbs) or three (dogs < 25 lbs) injections the first year, with a booster each year after that (although some dogs warrant a booster twice per year – your veterinarian will discuss your dog’s needs with you).

Every dog living in the Big Country is at risk of running into a rattlesnake. If you live where rattlesnakes are being seen, or if your dog goes hunting, herding, camping, to the barn, lives on a ranch, etc., vaccination is critically important.

Rattlesnake strikes on dogs usually involve their head/neck or front feet. Unvaccinated dogs struck on the head or face can swell so severely that they suffocate before ever getting to the veterinary hospital for treatment. Those unvaccinated dogs fortunate enough to survive the initial snake strike can slough, or lose, huge areas of skin, leaving gaping wounds requiring months of hydrotherapy and additional surgeries to close. On the other hand, vaccinated dogs generally have dramatically reduced mortality, swelling, hospitalization time, and skin slough; it is commonly unnecessary to use antivenin with vaccinated dogs. Rattlesnake vaccinations have got to have one of the best returns on investment of any preventative care known to veterinary medicine!

Rattlesnake antivenin (not vaccine) is made from the blood serum of hyper immunized horses. A single dose of antivenin can make dogs so sensitive to horse serum that a subsequent dose of antivenin is rapidly fatal. This means that if your antivenin-treated dog gets struck by a rattler again, his treatment options are highly limited. If your dog has already been treated with antivenin, immunizing your dog with Rattlesnake vaccine eliminates the risk from additional antivenin by eliminating the need for antivenin.

RATTLESNAKE VACCINE, K9, 2ND
Our Records show it’s time for your pet to receive a Rattlesnake vaccine.
Rattlesnake2
Rattlesnake vaccine is a relatively new product recently approved for use throughout the United States. Ranchers and veterinarians have long known that after having been repeatedly bitten, dogs become resistant to rattlesnake bites. Vaccination works the same way – it will make your dog resistant but not immune. A vaccinated dog is much less likely to suffer permanent injury or die from rattlesnake bite, but it is still possible.

The vaccine is usually administered as two (for dogs > 25 lbs) or three (dogs < 25 lbs) injections the first year, with a booster each year after that (although some dogs warrant a booster twice per year – your veterinarian will discuss your dog’s needs with you).

Every dog living in the Big Country is at risk of running into a rattlesnake. If you live where rattlesnakes are being seen, or if your dog goes hunting, herding, camping, to the barn, lives on a ranch, etc., vaccination is critically important.

Rattlesnake strikes on dogs usually involve their head/neck or front feet. Unvaccinated dogs struck on the head or face can swell so severely that they suffocate before ever getting to the veterinary hospital for treatment. Those unvaccinated dogs fortunate enough to survive the initial snake strike can slough, or lose, huge areas of skin, leaving gaping wounds requiring months of hydrotherapy and additional surgeries to close. On the other hand, vaccinated dogs generally have dramatically reduced mortality, swelling, hospitalization time, and skin slough; it is commonly unnecessary to use antivenin with vaccinated dogs. Rattlesnake vaccinations have got to have one of the best returns on investment of any preventative care known to veterinary medicine!

Rattlesnake antivenin (not vaccine) is made from the blood serum of hyper immunized horses. A single dose of antivenin can make dogs so sensitive to horse serum that a subsequent dose of antivenin is rapidly fatal. This means that if your antivenin-treated dog gets struck by a rattler again, his treatment options are highly limited. If your dog has already been treated with antivenin, immunizing your dog with Rattlesnake vaccine eliminates the risk from additional antivenin by eliminating the need for antivenin.

RATTLESNAKE VACCINE, K9, ANNUAL
Our Records show it’s time for your pet to receive a Rattlesnake vaccine.
Rattlesnake2
Rattlesnake vaccine is a relatively new product recently approved for use throughout the United States. Ranchers and veterinarians have long known that after having been repeatedly bitten, dogs become resistant to rattlesnake bites. Vaccination works the same way – it will make your dog resistant but not immune. A vaccinated dog is much less likely to suffer permanent injury or die from rattlesnake bite, but it is still possible.

The vaccine is usually administered as two (for dogs > 25 lbs) or three (dogs < 25 lbs) injections the first year, with a booster each year after that (although some dogs warrant a booster twice per year – your veterinarian will discuss your dog’s needs with you).

Every dog living in the Big Country is at risk of running into a rattlesnake. If you live where rattlesnakes are being seen, or if your dog goes hunting, herding, camping, to the barn, lives on a ranch, etc., vaccination is critically important.

Rattlesnake strikes on dogs usually involve their head/neck or front feet. Unvaccinated dogs struck on the head or face can swell so severely that they suffocate before ever getting to the veterinary hospital for treatment. Those unvaccinated dogs fortunate enough to survive the initial snake strike can slough, or lose, huge areas of skin, leaving gaping wounds requiring months of hydrotherapy and additional surgeries to close. On the other hand, vaccinated dogs generally have dramatically reduced mortality, swelling, hospitalization time, and skin slough; it is commonly unnecessary to use antivenin with vaccinated dogs. Rattlesnake vaccinations have got to have one of the best returns on investment of any preventative care known to veterinary medicine!

Rattlesnake antivenin (not vaccine) is made from the blood serum of hyper immunized horses. A single dose of antivenin can make dogs so sensitive to horse serum that a subsequent dose of antivenin is rapidly fatal. This means that if your antivenin-treated dog gets struck by a rattler again, his treatment options are highly limited. If your dog has already been treated with antivenin, immunizing your dog with Rattlesnake vaccine eliminates the risk from additional antivenin by eliminating the need for antivenin.

Revolution Blue, feline, 6 pack
Our records show your cat is due a refill of Revolution monthly heartworm/flea preventative. Revolution is an important part of the health maintenance of your cat:

All cats living in Texas are at risk for contracting heartworms. Heartworm larvae are carried by mosquitoes; indoor cats are as at risk as outdoor cats. Since heartworm infection in cats can’t be cured, just managed, it is vital for your cat’s well-being to prevent infection in the first place.

Heartworms are not the only infection cats in Texas are at risk for: fleas are an all-too-common problem. We are familiar with the misery fleas can cause in cats: the itching/scratching/excessive grooming, dermatitis, and hair loss. In addition, fleas commonly carry tapeworms, which can cause internal misery for your feline friends. Indoor/outdoor cats, outdoor cats, cats living in multi-cat households, and cats living with dogs are all at high risk of exposure to fleas.

Ear mites are a common source of misery for cats and kittens. Ear mites chew & suck on the lining of the ear canals, causing intense itching, head shaking, abundant crumbly black ear debris, and secondary ear infections. Cats with severe ear mite infections can also have ear mite dermatitis on their neck and back. Indoor-outdoor cats, outdoor cats, cats living in multi-cat households, kittens/cats from humane shelters, and kittens/cats from catteries are all at high risk for acquiring ear mites.

Did you know that, on average, 21% of the dogs and cats in the United States have intestinal worms? Roundworms & hookworms are easily spread because infected cats pass worm eggs in their stools. Your pet can acquire worms through using a contaminated litter box or just grooming his paws after walking across a contaminated lawn. Roundworms and hookworms can also infect people, especially children. Roundworms can cause seizures and blindness in children; hookworms can cause dermatitits and intestinal disturbances. It is critically important to prevent our cats from becoming infested with intestinal parasites.

Revolution is a once-a-month, topical product that prevents heartworms, fleas, ear mites, roundworms and hookworms in cats. It is the only product on the market that prevents all five of these parasites. The active ingredient, Selamectin, is safe in all breeds of cats and kittens, and is compatible with all prescription medications. Revolution is recommended by the doctors of Windmill Animal Hospital for the prevention and control of these parasites in all our feline patients, whether they go outside or not. Please make sure your cat is protected!

Did you know that you can purchase your Interceptor at Windmill Animal Hospital for the same price as those other On-Line pet pharmacies? In fact, usually we are a few cents cheaper!

Revolution Pink 3-pack, dog/cat < 5 lbs
Our records show your cat is due a refill of Revolution monthly heartworm/flea preventative. Revolution is an important part of the health maintenance of your cat:

All cats living in Texas are at risk for contracting heartworms. Heartworm larvae are carried by mosquitoes; indoor cats are as at risk as outdoor cats. Since heartworm infection in cats can’t be cured, just managed, it is vital for your cat’s well-being to prevent infection in the first place.

Heartworms are not the only infection cats in Texas are at risk for: fleas are an all-too-common problem. We are familiar with the misery fleas can cause in cats: the itching/scratching/excessive grooming, dermatitis, and hair loss. In addition, fleas commonly carry tapeworms, which can cause internal misery for your feline friends. Indoor/outdoor cats, outdoor cats, cats living in multi-cat households, and cats living with dogs are all at high risk of exposure to fleas.

Ear mites are a common source of misery for cats and kittens. Ear mites chew & suck on the lining of the ear canals, causing intense itching, head shaking, abundant crumbly black ear debris, and secondary ear infections. Cats with severe ear mite infections can also have ear mite dermatitis on their neck and back. Indoor-outdoor cats, outdoor cats, cats living in multi-cat households, kittens/cats from humane shelters, and kittens/cats from catteries are all at high risk for acquiring ear mites.

Did you know that, on average, 21% of the dogs and cats in the United States have intestinal worms? Roundworms & hookworms are easily spread because infected cats pass worm eggs in their stools. Your pet can acquire worms through using a contaminated litter box or just grooming his paws after walking across a contaminated lawn. Roundworms and hookworms can also infect people, especially children. Roundworms can cause seizures and blindness in children; hookworms can cause dermatitits and intestinal disturbances. It is critically important to prevent our cats from becoming infested with intestinal parasites.

Revolution is a once-a-month, topical product that prevents heartworms, fleas, ear mites, roundworms and hookworms in cats. It is the only product on the market that prevents all five of these parasites. The active ingredient, Selamectin, is safe in all breeds of cats and kittens, and is compatible with all prescription medications. Revolution is recommended by the doctors of Windmill Animal Hospital for the prevention and control of these parasites in all our feline patients, whether they go outside or not. Please make sure your cat is protected!

Did you know that you can purchase your Interceptor at Windmill Animal Hospital for the same price as those other On-Line pet pharmacies? In fact, usually we are a few cents cheaper!

Sentinel BROWN 6 pk 2-10 lbs
Our records indicate your pet should have received the last monthly dose of Sentinel.

Sentinel is a prescription chewable monthly oral combination heartworm/intestinal worm/flea preventative. It has two ingredients: Milbemycin, which prevents heartworms & intestinal worms, and Lufenuron, which sterilizes fleas. Sentinel is an extremely safe combination preventative, enjoying a long, proven track record of efficacy with good patient tolerance.

Dogs who already have heartworms can have a potentially fatal drug reaction if given heartworm prevention, including Sentinel. This is why Sentinel is by prescription only. All dogs 6 months of age or older will be heartworm tested prior to starting heartworm preventative, and heartworm tested annually thereafter. Sentinel can not be dispensed without your pet being current on his heartworm test.

Novartis, the manufacturer of Sentinel, guarantees the product to prevent heartworms, whipworms, roundworms, hookworms, and flea infestations. The only requirement to activate or maintain the warranty is a negative heartworm test and negative intestinal parasite test prior to starting the product, and annually thereafter. The warranty is in effect as long as the product is purchased in a timely manner. Sentinel is safe for use in puppies, adult dogs, geriatric dogs, pregnant/nursing dogs, breeding male dogs, and dogs with health problems. There are no known drug interaction problems with Sentinel.

The doctors of Windmill Animal Hospital recommend using Sentinel as a combination preventative for all dogs with low risk of tick exposure and flea infestation.

Did you know that you can purchase your Sentinel at Windmill Animal Hospital for the same price as those other On-Line pet pharmacies? In fact, usually we are a few cents cheaper!

Sentinel BROWN 7th free dose
Our records indicate your pet should have received the last monthly dose of Sentinel.

Sentinel is a prescription chewable monthly oral combination heartworm/intestinal worm/flea preventative. It has two ingredients: Milbemycin, which prevents heartworms & intestinal worms, and Lufenuron, which sterilizes fleas. Sentinel is an extremely safe combination preventative, enjoying a long, proven track record of efficacy with good patient tolerance.

Dogs who already have heartworms can have a potentially fatal drug reaction if given heartworm prevention, including Sentinel. This is why Sentinel is by prescription only. All dogs 6 months of age or older will be heartworm tested prior to starting heartworm preventative, and heartworm tested annually thereafter. Sentinel can not be dispensed without your pet being current on his heartworm test.

Novartis, the manufacturer of Sentinel, guarantees the product to prevent heartworms, whipworms, roundworms, hookworms, and flea infestations. The only requirement to activate or maintain the warranty is a negative heartworm test and negative intestinal parasite test prior to starting the product, and annually thereafter. The warranty is in effect as long as the product is purchased in a timely manner. Sentinel is safe for use in puppies, adult dogs, geriatric dogs, pregnant/nursing dogs, breeding male dogs, and dogs with health problems. There are no known drug interaction problems with Sentinel.

The doctors of Windmill Animal Hospital recommend using Sentinel as a combination preventative for all dogs with low risk of tick exposure and flea infestation.

Did you know that you can purchase your Sentinel at Windmill Animal Hospital for the same price as those other On-Line pet pharmacies? In fact, usually we are a few cents cheaper!

Sentinel BROWN single, 2-10 lbs
Our records indicate your pet should have received the last monthly dose of Sentinel.

Sentinel is a prescription chewable monthly oral combination heartworm/intestinal worm/flea preventative. It has two ingredients: Milbemycin, which prevents heartworms & intestinal worms, and Lufenuron, which sterilizes fleas. Sentinel is an extremely safe combination preventative, enjoying a long, proven track record of efficacy with good patient tolerance.

Dogs who already have heartworms can have a potentially fatal drug reaction if given heartworm prevention, including Sentinel. This is why Sentinel is by prescription only. All dogs 6 months of age or older will be heartworm tested prior to starting heartworm preventative, and heartworm tested annually thereafter. Sentinel can not be dispensed without your pet being current on his heartworm test.

Novartis, the manufacturer of Sentinel, guarantees the product to prevent heartworms, whipworms, roundworms, hookworms, and flea infestations. The only requirement to activate or maintain the warranty is a negative heartworm test and negative intestinal parasite test prior to starting the product, and annually thereafter. The warranty is in effect as long as the product is purchased in a timely manner. Sentinel is safe for use in puppies, adult dogs, geriatric dogs, pregnant/nursing dogs, breeding male dogs, and dogs with health problems. There are no known drug interaction problems with Sentinel.

The doctors of Windmill Animal Hospital recommend using Sentinel as a combination preventative for all dogs with low risk of tick exposure and flea infestation.

Did you know that you can purchase your Sentinel at Windmill Animal Hospital for the same price as those other On-Line pet pharmacies? In fact, usually we are a few cents cheaper!

Sentinel GREEN 6 pk 10.1 – 25 lbs
Our records indicate your pet should have received the last monthly dose of Sentinel.

Sentinel is a prescription chewable monthly oral combination heartworm/intestinal worm/flea preventative. It has two ingredients: Milbemycin, which prevents heartworms & intestinal worms, and Lufenuron, which sterilizes fleas. Sentinel is an extremely safe combination preventative, enjoying a long, proven track record of efficacy with good patient tolerance.

Dogs who already have heartworms can have a potentially fatal drug reaction if given heartworm prevention, including Sentinel. This is why Sentinel is by prescription only. All dogs 6 months of age or older will be heartworm tested prior to starting heartworm preventative, and heartworm tested annually thereafter. Sentinel can not be dispensed without your pet being current on his heartworm test.

Novartis, the manufacturer of Sentinel, guarantees the product to prevent heartworms, whipworms, roundworms, hookworms, and flea infestations. The only requirement to activate or maintain the warranty is a negative heartworm test and negative intestinal parasite test prior to starting the product, and annually thereafter. The warranty is in effect as long as the product is purchased in a timely manner. Sentinel is safe for use in puppies, adult dogs, geriatric dogs, pregnant/nursing dogs, breeding male dogs, and dogs with health problems. There are no known drug interaction problems with Sentinel.

The doctors of Windmill Animal Hospital recommend using Sentinel as a combination preventative for all dogs with low risk of tick exposure and flea infestation.

Did you know that you can purchase your Sentinel at Windmill Animal Hospital for the same price as those other On-Line pet pharmacies? In fact, usually we are a few cents cheaper!

Sentinel GREEN 7th free dose
Our records indicate your pet should have received the last monthly dose of Sentinel.

Sentinel is a prescription chewable monthly oral combination heartworm/intestinal worm/flea preventative. It has two ingredients: Milbemycin, which prevents heartworms & intestinal worms, and Lufenuron, which sterilizes fleas. Sentinel is an extremely safe combination preventative, enjoying a long, proven track record of efficacy with good patient tolerance.

Dogs who already have heartworms can have a potentially fatal drug reaction if given heartworm prevention, including Sentinel. This is why Sentinel is by prescription only. All dogs 6 months of age or older will be heartworm tested prior to starting heartworm preventative, and heartworm tested annually thereafter. Sentinel can not be dispensed without your pet being current on his heartworm test.

Novartis, the manufacturer of Sentinel, guarantees the product to prevent heartworms, whipworms, roundworms, hookworms, and flea infestations. The only requirement to activate or maintain the warranty is a negative heartworm test and negative intestinal parasite test prior to starting the product, and annually thereafter. The warranty is in effect as long as the product is purchased in a timely manner. Sentinel is safe for use in puppies, adult dogs, geriatric dogs, pregnant/nursing dogs, breeding male dogs, and dogs with health problems. There are no known drug interaction problems with Sentinel.

The doctors of Windmill Animal Hospital recommend using Sentinel as a combination preventative for all dogs with low risk of tick exposure and flea infestation.

Did you know that you can purchase your Sentinel at Windmill Animal Hospital for the same price as those other On-Line pet pharmacies? In fact, usually we are a few cents cheaper!

Sentinel GREEN SINGLE 10.1 – 25 lbs
Our records indicate your pet should have received the last monthly dose of Sentinel.

Sentinel is a prescription chewable monthly oral combination heartworm/intestinal worm/flea preventative. It has two ingredients: Milbemycin, which prevents heartworms & intestinal worms, and Lufenuron, which sterilizes fleas. Sentinel is an extremely safe combination preventative, enjoying a long, proven track record of efficacy with good patient tolerance.

Dogs who already have heartworms can have a potentially fatal drug reaction if given heartworm prevention, including Sentinel. This is why Sentinel is by prescription only. All dogs 6 months of age or older will be heartworm tested prior to starting heartworm preventative, and heartworm tested annually thereafter. Sentinel can not be dispensed without your pet being current on his heartworm test.

Novartis, the manufacturer of Sentinel, guarantees the product to prevent heartworms, whipworms, roundworms, hookworms, and flea infestations. The only requirement to activate or maintain the warranty is a negative heartworm test and negative intestinal parasite test prior to starting the product, and annually thereafter. The warranty is in effect as long as the product is purchased in a timely manner. Sentinel is safe for use in puppies, adult dogs, geriatric dogs, pregnant/nursing dogs, breeding male dogs, and dogs with health problems. There are no known drug interaction problems with Sentinel.

The doctors of Windmill Animal Hospital recommend using Sentinel as a combination preventative for all dogs with low risk of tick exposure and flea infestation.

Did you know that you can purchase your Sentinel at Windmill Animal Hospital for the same price as those other On-Line pet pharmacies? In fact, usually we are a few cents cheaper!

Sentinel WHITE 6pk 50-100 lbs
Our records indicate your pet should have received the last monthly dose of Sentinel.

Sentinel is a prescription chewable monthly oral combination heartworm/intestinal worm/flea preventative. It has two ingredients: Milbemycin, which prevents heartworms & intestinal worms, and Lufenuron, which sterilizes fleas. Sentinel is an extremely safe combination preventative, enjoying a long, proven track record of efficacy with good patient tolerance.

Dogs who already have heartworms can have a potentially fatal drug reaction if given heartworm prevention, including Sentinel. This is why Sentinel is by prescription only. All dogs 6 months of age or older will be heartworm tested prior to starting heartworm preventative, and heartworm tested annually thereafter. Sentinel can not be dispensed without your pet being current on his heartworm test.

Novartis, the manufacturer of Sentinel, guarantees the product to prevent heartworms, whipworms, roundworms, hookworms, and flea infestations. The only requirement to activate or maintain the warranty is a negative heartworm test and negative intestinal parasite test prior to starting the product, and annually thereafter. The warranty is in effect as long as the product is purchased in a timely manner. Sentinel is safe for use in puppies, adult dogs, geriatric dogs, pregnant/nursing dogs, breeding male dogs, and dogs with health problems. There are no known drug interaction problems with Sentinel.

The doctors of Windmill Animal Hospital recommend using Sentinel as a combination preventative for all dogs with low risk of tick exposure and flea infestation.

Did you know that you can purchase your Sentinel at Windmill Animal Hospital for the same price as those other On-Line pet pharmacies? In fact, usually we are a few cents cheaper!

Sentinel WHITE 7th free dose
Our records indicate your pet should have received the last monthly dose of Sentinel.

Sentinel is a prescription chewable monthly oral combination heartworm/intestinal worm/flea preventative. It has two ingredients: Milbemycin, which prevents heartworms & intestinal worms, and Lufenuron, which sterilizes fleas. Sentinel is an extremely safe combination preventative, enjoying a long, proven track record of efficacy with good patient tolerance.

Dogs who already have heartworms can have a potentially fatal drug reaction if given heartworm prevention, including Sentinel. This is why Sentinel is by prescription only. All dogs 6 months of age or older will be heartworm tested prior to starting heartworm preventative, and heartworm tested annually thereafter. Sentinel can not be dispensed without your pet being current on his heartworm test.

Novartis, the manufacturer of Sentinel, guarantees the product to prevent heartworms, whipworms, roundworms, hookworms, and flea infestations. The only requirement to activate or maintain the warranty is a negative heartworm test and negative intestinal parasite test prior to starting the product, and annually thereafter. The warranty is in effect as long as the product is purchased in a timely manner. Sentinel is safe for use in puppies, adult dogs, geriatric dogs, pregnant/nursing dogs, breeding male dogs, and dogs with health problems. There are no known drug interaction problems with Sentinel.

The doctors of Windmill Animal Hospital recommend using Sentinel as a combination preventative for all dogs with low risk of tick exposure and flea infestation.

Did you know that you can purchase your Sentinel at Windmill Animal Hospital for the same price as those other On-Line pet pharmacies? In fact, usually we are a few cents cheaper!

Sentinel WHITE single 50-100 lbs
Our records indicate your pet should have received the last monthly dose of Sentinel.

Sentinel is a prescription chewable monthly oral combination heartworm/intestinal worm/flea preventative. It has two ingredients: Milbemycin, which prevents heartworms & intestinal worms, and Lufenuron, which sterilizes fleas. Sentinel is an extremely safe combination preventative, enjoying a long, proven track record of efficacy with good patient tolerance.

Dogs who already have heartworms can have a potentially fatal drug reaction if given heartworm prevention, including Sentinel. This is why Sentinel is by prescription only. All dogs 6 months of age or older will be heartworm tested prior to starting heartworm preventative, and heartworm tested annually thereafter. Sentinel can not be dispensed without your pet being current on his heartworm test.

Novartis, the manufacturer of Sentinel, guarantees the product to prevent heartworms, whipworms, roundworms, hookworms, and flea infestations. The only requirement to activate or maintain the warranty is a negative heartworm test and negative intestinal parasite test prior to starting the product, and annually thereafter. The warranty is in effect as long as the product is purchased in a timely manner. Sentinel is safe for use in puppies, adult dogs, geriatric dogs, pregnant/nursing dogs, breeding male dogs, and dogs with health problems. There are no known drug interaction problems with Sentinel.

The doctors of Windmill Animal Hospital recommend using Sentinel as a combination preventative for all dogs with low risk of tick exposure and flea infestation.

Did you know that you can purchase your Sentinel at Windmill Animal Hospital for the same price as those other On-Line pet pharmacies? In fact, usually we are a few cents cheaper!

Sentinel YELLOW 6 pk 26-50 lbs
Our records indicate your pet should have received the last monthly dose of Sentinel.

Sentinel is a prescription chewable monthly oral combination heartworm/intestinal worm/flea preventative. It has two ingredients: Milbemycin, which prevents heartworms & intestinal worms, and Lufenuron, which sterilizes fleas. Sentinel is an extremely safe combination preventative, enjoying a long, proven track record of efficacy with good patient tolerance.

Dogs who already have heartworms can have a potentially fatal drug reaction if given heartworm prevention, including Sentinel. This is why Sentinel is by prescription only. All dogs 6 months of age or older will be heartworm tested prior to starting heartworm preventative, and heartworm tested annually thereafter. Sentinel can not be dispensed without your pet being current on his heartworm test.

Novartis, the manufacturer of Sentinel, guarantees the product to prevent heartworms, whipworms, roundworms, hookworms, and flea infestations. The only requirement to activate or maintain the warranty is a negative heartworm test and negative intestinal parasite test prior to starting the product, and annually thereafter. The warranty is in effect as long as the product is purchased in a timely manner. Sentinel is safe for use in puppies, adult dogs, geriatric dogs, pregnant/nursing dogs, breeding male dogs, and dogs with health problems. There are no known drug interaction problems with Sentinel.

The doctors of Windmill Animal Hospital recommend using Sentinel as a combination preventative for all dogs with low risk of tick exposure and flea infestation.

Did you know that you can purchase your Sentinel at Windmill Animal Hospital for the same price as those other On-Line pet pharmacies? In fact, usually we are a few cents cheaper!

Sentinel YELLOW single 26-50 lbs
Our records indicate your pet should have received the last monthly dose of Sentinel.

Sentinel is a prescription chewable monthly oral combination heartworm/intestinal worm/flea preventative. It has two ingredients: Milbemycin, which prevents heartworms & intestinal worms, and Lufenuron, which sterilizes fleas. Sentinel is an extremely safe combination preventative, enjoying a long, proven track record of efficacy with good patient tolerance.

Dogs who already have heartworms can have a potentially fatal drug reaction if given heartworm prevention, including Sentinel. This is why Sentinel is by prescription only. All dogs 6 months of age or older will be heartworm tested prior to starting heartworm preventative, and heartworm tested annually thereafter. Sentinel can not be dispensed without your pet being current on his heartworm test.

Novartis, the manufacturer of Sentinel, guarantees the product to prevent heartworms, whipworms, roundworms, hookworms, and flea infestations. The only requirement to activate or maintain the warranty is a negative heartworm test and negative intestinal parasite test prior to starting the product, and annually thereafter. The warranty is in effect as long as the product is purchased in a timely manner. Sentinel is safe for use in puppies, adult dogs, geriatric dogs, pregnant/nursing dogs, breeding male dogs, and dogs with health problems. There are no known drug interaction problems with Sentinel.

The doctors of Windmill Animal Hospital recommend using Sentinel as a combination preventative for all dogs with low risk of tick exposure and flea infestation.

Did you know that you can purchase your Sentinel at Windmill Animal Hospital for the same price as those other On-Line pet pharmacies? In fact, usually we are a few cents cheaper!

TECHNICIAN VISIT
Your pet is due for a Technician Visit. What is a Technician Visit? It’s a visit, usually halfway between your pet’s annual checkups, when your pet is due for a Bordetella 6 Month Booster, a Fecal Examination, follow-up lab work, or some pother quick procedure that does not require a doctor (and , therefore, an office visit fee). The technician will update your pet’s weight in the system, take your pet’s vital signs, and perform the services your pet needs. If lab work is done, the results will be reviewed by your pet’s veterinarian, and you will be called with the lab results.
THYROID RECHECK-4 HRS POST MED
Our records show your pet is due for some diagnostic laboratory blood tests. These tests fall into 4 categories:

  1. Your pet’s previous lab work (such as a pre-anesthetic profile associated with an routine surgical procedure, or bloodwork associated with an illness your pet endured, or a previous urinary tract infection), revealed a POSSIBLE problem. You are being sent this reminder to alert you that it’s time to recheck your pet’s lab work, to verify that there IS or IS NOT a concern with your pet’s internal health. Abnormalities in lab work that commonly show up that need to be double-checked include elevated kidney values, elevated liver values, elevated white blood cell counts, depressed platelet counts, urinary tract infections/crystals, etc. Rechecking your pet’s lab work will indicate whether the abnormality has resolved, or will need to be managed in future.
  2. Your pet has been diagnosed with a chronic medical ailment, such as diabetes or compromised kidney function, and the values need a routine recheck. Routine rechecks, usually twice a year, are critical to proper management of your pet’s chronic health problem, to insure proper management and optimum comfort and longevity for your pet.
  3. Your pet is on long-term anticonvulsant medications, such as phenobarbital or potassium bromide, or is on hormonal supplementation, such as for low thyroid, or is on long-term Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammtant drugs for chronic pain. Serum anticonvulsant medication levels MUST be checked at least annually, as well as a Complete Blood Count and a General Chemistry Panel. If the levels get too low, therefore, ineffective, your pet will start seizing again. If the levels get too high, the anticonvulsant drug becomes dangerous, toxic, and could induce the very seizures it is designed to prevent. The only way to know if the dose of anticonvulsant is correct is to check the serum levels. The only way to make sure the anticonvulsant isn’t causing problems with your pet’s internal organ health is to do blood work. Thyroid and other hormone supplementation must also be checked at least annually–if the dose is too low, your pet will receive no benefit and you will waste your time and money; if the dose is too high, your pet’s health could be seriously harmed. NonSteroidal Anti-Inflammatant Drugs (known as NSAIDs) do a very good job of relieving pain, but they ALL can cause digestive upset, they ALL put stress on the liver, and they ALL lower blood pressure to the kidneys. Therefore, pets on long-term NSAIDs MUST have their liver & kidney health checked at least every 6 months, as well as a complete blod count to verify no chronic blood loss through GIT inflammation.
  4. Your pet is 8 years of age or older, and needs routine blood screens to verify normal internal organ health. All senior pets (8 years +), and, especially geriatric pets (10 years +), should have their internal health assessed via blood work at least annually. The earlier a developing problem is detected, the easier and less expensive it is to manage.

Windmill Animal Hospital has extensive in-house lab test capability; we are able to process most of our patients’ lab testing needs right here at our hospital. This means fast turn-around, and accurate results for you, our client!

Please call or email us today, to discuss your pet’s lab work needs, and get an appointment scheduled.

TIME FOR GROOMING APPOINTMENT
Our records indicate that it is time for your pet to be groomed again.

Grooming your pet is MUCH more than just bathing your pet so he/she smells good!

A complete grooming service means your pet has received an extensive body massage and hydrotherapy, during the bathing/shampooing process.

Grooming at Windmill Animal Hospital means your pet’s ears have been cleaned and plucked free of ear hair (thereby reducing the risk of painful ear infections).

Grooming at Windmill Animal Hospital means your pet’s nails have been trimmed (thereby protecting your pet’s comfort, and reducing the risk of fractured/hung nails).

Finally, grooming at Windmill Animal Hospital means your pet’s anal glands have been properly emptied, insuring your pet’s comfort and prevent that detestible “butt scooting boogie” seen when those anal glands are full!

So, a full-service groom, such as is provided by Kameron, our all-breed groomer at Windmill Animal Hospital, is more like a day at the doggie or kitty spa! Plus, your pet looks like a million bucks, and smells good, too!

Call or email today for an appointment!

TIME FOR PET’S DECLAW
Your pet has been diagnosed by one of the doctors at Windmill Animal Hospital as having a medical concern that needs to be resolved via surgery, or an elective surgery that you’ve discussed with one of our doctors that needs to be scheduled.. The most common reasons for a pet to need surgery, excluding spay/neuter, is to remove a lump or bump, surgical correction of an orthopedic problem such as a ruptured Cranial Cruciate Ligament, or to repair a hernia. Elective procedures include dewclaw removal, stenotic nares correction, and other procedures that will help your pet’s comfort and longevity. There are many other conditions that also require surgery to resolve. This reminder was sent to you to help you remember to get your pet scheduled!
TIME FOR PET’S DENTAL APPOINTMENT!!
Our records indicate that your pet has periodontal disease, and is in need of a dental cleaning. By 3 years of age, 85% of our pets have periodontal disease, so your pet is in good company!

What does periodontal disease mean? How do you tell if your pet has periodontal disease? It’s easy–does your pet have bad breath? If you flip your pet’s lip up and look at his teeth, can you see unsightly tartar? inflamed/bleeding gums? Does your pet resist his muzzle being handles, due to pain? Is your pet no longer playing with his toys?

There are a variety of reasons so many of our dogs and cats are affected with periodontal disease.

The primary risk factors for periodontal disease in dogs are Small Mouth/Crowded Mouth/Hairy Mouth. In other words, a small dog (like a Yorkie), a dog with a snub nose (and, therefore, crowded/crooked teeth), or a dog with lots of facial hair (think Schnauzer) have a lot more problems with periodontal disease than, say, a Labrador.

The risk factors for cats for periodontal disease include specific breeds (especially Abyssinians), snub nose (Himalayan or Persian) and cats in multi-cat households (due to chronic viral infections).

Think of how uncomfortable you are if you eat popcorn and have a popcorn hull lodged in your gums. Now, magnify that oral pain tenfold, and imagine living with it daily–that’s what pets endure that have periodontal disease.

Elderly pets whose mouths have been neglected have the additional agony of bone infection (osteomyelitis) to deal with.

To make matters worse, the bacteria that cause gingivitis in pets have a particular affinity for the heart, liver and kidneys; the rich blood supply of the gums means every time a pet with periodontal disease eats, drinks, chews, licks,or grooms, he is causing a cascade of bacteria to enter his bloodstream and target those vital organs.

The only health problems that age a pet as fast as periodontal disease are osteoarthritis and cancer.

Good dental care is one of the most loving and beneficial things we can do for our pets! Proper dental health care can:
· Add 3-5 happy years to a dog or cat’s lifespan
· Prevent heart, liver and kidney disease
· Prevent oral pain and BAD BREATH

The good news is that good dental health care doesn’t have to be expensive! Windmill Animal Hospital offers complete dental services for your pet, including dental cleaning/polishing, dental xrays, extractions, and restorative procedures. However, if your pet’s teeth are cleaned on a regular basis, those other services likely won’t be needed!

Call today to get your pet’s dental cleaning scheduled, and see how easily we can help your pet be healthier and more comfortable with an organized dental maintenance plan

TIME FOR PET’S DENTAL! (STAGE II)
Our records indicate that your pet has Stage 2/4 periodontal disease, and is in need of a dental cleaning. By 3 years of age, 85% of our pets have periodontal disease, so your pet is in good company!

What does “Stage 2/4 periodontal disease” mean? Periodontal disease in dogs and cats is assessed by what level of advancement, or stage, it is in. Stage 2 means your pet has some significant infection, ongoing damage, and pain in his mouth. Stage 2 has gingivitis, or gum infection, involving more than 50% of the teeth, and tartar, or dental calculus, covering more than 50% of the visible tooth surfaces. Fortunately, the damage caused by Stage 2/4 periodontal disease is mostly reversible.

How do you tell if your pet has periodontal disease? It’s easy–does your pet have bad breath? If you flip your pet’s lip up and look at his teeth, can you see unsightly tartar? inflamed/bleeding gums? Does your pet resist his muzzle being handles, due to pain? Is your pet no longer playing with his toys?

There are a variety of reasons so many of our dogs and cats are affected with periodontal disease.

The primary risk factors for periodontal disease in dogs are Small Mouth/Crowded Mouth/Hairy Mouth. In other words, a small dog (like a Yorkie), a dog with a snub nose (and, therefore, crowded/crooked teeth), or a dog with lots of facial hair (think Schnauzer) have a lot more problems with periodontal disease than, say, a Labrador.

The risk factors for cats for periodontal disease include specific breeds (especially Abyssinians), snub nose (Himalayan or Persian) and cats in multi-cat households (due to chronic viral infections).

Think of how uncomfortable you are if you eat popcorn and have a popcorn hull lodged in your gums. Now, magnify that oral pain tenfold, and imagine living with it daily–that’s what pets endure that have periodontal disease.

Elderly pets whose mouths have been neglected have the additional agony of bone infection (osteomyelitis) to deal with.

To make matters worse, the bacteria that cause gingivitis in pets have a particular affinity for the heart, liver and kidneys; the rich blood supply of the gums means every time a pet with periodontal disease eats, drinks, chews, licks,or grooms, he is causing a cascade of bacteria to enter his bloodstream and target those vital organs.

The only health problems that age a pet as fast as periodontal disease are osteoarthritis and cancer.

Good dental care is one of the most loving and beneficial things we can do for our pets! Proper dental health care can:
· Add 3-5 happy years to a dog or cat’s lifespan
· Prevent heart, liver and kidney disease
· Prevent oral pain and BAD BREATH

The good news is that good dental health care doesn’t have to be expensive! Windmill Animal Hospital offers complete dental services for your pet, including dental cleaning/polishing, dental xrays, extractions, and restorative procedures. However, if your pet’s teeth are cleaned on a regular basis, those other services likely won’t be needed!

Call today to get your pet’s dental cleaning scheduled, and see how easily we can help your pet be healthier and more comfortable with an organized dental maintenance plan.

TIME FOR PET’S DENTAL! (STAGE I)
Our records indicate that your pet has Stage 1/4 periodontal disease, and is in need of a dental cleaning. By 3 years of age, 85% of our pets have periodontal disease, so your pet is in good company!

What does “Stage 1/4 periodontal disease” mean? Periodontal disease in dogs and cats is assessed by what level of advancement, or stage, it is in. Stage 1 is the most favorable: Gingivitis, or gum infection, is involving less than 50% of the teeth, and tartar, or dental calculus, is covering less than 50% of the visible tooth surfaces. Best of all, Stage 1/4 periodontal disease means no irreversible damage!

How do you tell if your pet has periodontal disease? It’s easy–does your pet have bad breath? If you flip your pet’s lip up and look at his teeth, can you see unsightly tartar? inflamed/bleeding gums? Does your pet resist his muzzle being handles, due to pain? Is your pet no longer playing with his toys?

There are a variety of reasons so many of our dogs and cats are affected with periodontal disease.

The primary risk factors for periodontal disease in dogs are Small Mouth/Crowded Mouth/Hairy Mouth. In other words, a small dog (like a Yorkie), a dog with a snub nose (and, therefore, crowded/crooked teeth), or a dog with lots of facial hair (think Schnauzer) have a lot more problems with periodontal disease than, say, a Labrador.

The risk factors for cats for periodontal disease include specific breeds (especially Abyssinians), snub nose (Himalayan or Persian) and cats in multi-cat households (due to chronic viral infections).

Think of how uncomfortable you are if you eat popcorn and have a popcorn hull lodged in your gums. Now, magnify that oral pain tenfold, and imagine living with it daily–that’s what pets endure that have periodontal disease.

Elderly pets whose mouths have been neglected have the additional agony of bone infection (osteomyelitis) to deal with.

To make matters worse, the bacteria that cause gingivitis in pets have a particular affinity for the heart, liver and kidneys; the rich blood supply of the gums means every time a pet with periodontal disease eats, drinks, chews, licks,or grooms, he is causing a cascade of bacteria to enter his bloodstream and target those vital organs.

The only health problems that age a pet as fast as periodontal disease are osteoarthritis and cancer.

Good dental care is one of the most loving and beneficial things we can do for our pets! Proper dental health care can:
· Add 3-5 happy years to a dog or cat’s lifespan
· Prevent heart, liver and kidney disease
· Prevent oral pain and BAD BREATH

The good news is that good dental health care doesn’t have to be expensive! Windmill Animal Hospital offers complete dental services for your pet, including dental cleaning/polishing, dental xrays, extractions, and restorative procedures. However, if your pet’s teeth are cleaned on a regular basis, those other services likely won’t be needed!

Call today to get your pet’s dental cleaning scheduled, and see how easily we can help your pet be healthier and more comfortable with an organized dental maintenance plan.

TIME FOR PET’S DENTAL! (STAGE III)
Our records indicate that your pet has Stage 3/4 periodontal disease, and is in need of a dental cleaning. By 3 years of age, 85% of our pets have periodontal disease, so your pet is in good company!

What does “Stage 3/4 periodontal disease” mean? Periodontal disease in dogs and cats is assessed by what level of advancement, or stage, it is in. Stage 3 means your pet has significant infection, ongoing damage, and pain in his mouth. Stage 3 has pronounced gingivitis, or gum infection, involving almost all of the teeth, and heavy caps of tartar, or dental calculus, covering most of the visible tooth surfaces. In addition, most pets with Stage 3/4 periodontal disease will have some mobile, or loose teeth, that need removal. Much of the damage caused by Stage 3/4 periodontal disease is irreversible, but a thorough dental cleaning, extraction of nonviable and/or loose teeth, and an organized dental management plan, can prevent further damage.

How do you tell if your pet has periodontal disease? It’s easy–does your pet have bad breath? If you flip your pet’s lip up and look at his teeth, can you see unsightly tartar? inflamed/bleeding gums? Does your pet resist his muzzle being handles, due to pain? Is your pet no longer playing with his toys?

There are a variety of reasons so many of our dogs and cats are affected with periodontal disease.

The primary risk factors for periodontal disease in dogs are Small Mouth/Crowded Mouth/Hairy Mouth. In other words, a small dog (like a Yorkie), a dog with a snub nose (and, therefore, crowded/crooked teeth), or a dog with lots of facial hair (think Schnauzer) have a lot more problems with periodontal disease than, say, a Labrador.

The risk factors for cats for periodontal disease include specific breeds (especially Abyssinians), snub nose (Himalayan or Persian) and cats in multi-cat households (due to chronic viral infections).

Think of how uncomfortable you are if you eat popcorn and have a popcorn hull lodged in your gums. Now, magnify that oral pain tenfold, and imagine living with it daily–that’s what pets endure that have periodontal disease.

Elderly pets whose mouths have been neglected have the additional agony of bone infection (osteomyelitis) to deal with.

To make matters worse, the bacteria that cause gingivitis in pets have a particular affinity for the heart, liver and kidneys; the rich blood supply of the gums means every time a pet with periodontal disease eats, drinks, chews, licks,or grooms, he is causing a cascade of bacteria to enter his bloodstream and target those vital organs.

The only health problems that age a pet as fast as periodontal disease are osteoarthritis and cancer.

Good dental care is one of the most loving and beneficial things we can do for our pets! Proper dental health care can:
· Add 3-5 happy years to a dog or cat’s lifespan
· Prevent heart, liver and kidney disease
· Prevent oral pain and BAD BREATH

The good news is that good dental health care doesn’t have to be expensive! Windmill Animal Hospital offers complete dental services for your pet, including dental cleaning/polishing, dental xrays, extractions, and restorative procedures. However, if your pet’s teeth are cleaned on a regular basis, those other services likely won’t be needed!

Call today to get your pet’s dental cleaning scheduled, and see how easily we can help your pet be healthier and more comfortable with an organized dental maintenance plan

TIME FOR PET’S DENTAL! (STAGE IV)
Our records indicate that your pet has Stage 4/4 periodontal disease, and is in need of a dental cleaning. By 3 years of age, 85% of our pets have periodontal disease, so your pet is in good company!

What does “Stage 4/4 periodontal disease” mean? Periodontal disease in dogs and cats is assessed by what level of advancement, or stage, it is in. Stage 4 means your pet has pronounced infection, advanced damage, and severe pain in his mouth. Stage 4 has pronounced gingivitis, or gum infection, involving all of the teeth, and heavy caps of tartar, or dental calculus, bridging the teeth and covering the visible tooth surfaces. In addition, most pets with Stage 4/4 periodontal disease will have already lost multiple teeth, and have mobile, or loose teeth, that need removal. The damage caused by Stage 4/4 periodontal disease is irreversible, but a thorough dental cleaning, extraction of nonviable and/or loose teeth, and an organized dental management plan, can prevent further damage and pain.

How do you tell if your pet has periodontal disease? It’s easy–does your pet have bad breath? If you flip your pet’s lip up and look at his teeth, can you see unsightly tartar? inflamed/bleeding gums? Does your pet resist his muzzle being handles, due to pain? Is your pet no longer playing with his toys?

There are a variety of reasons so many of our dogs and cats are affected with periodontal disease.

The primary risk factors for periodontal disease in dogs are Small Mouth/Crowded Mouth/Hairy Mouth. In other words, a small dog (like a Yorkie), a dog with a snub nose (and, therefore, crowded/crooked teeth), or a dog with lots of facial hair (think Schnauzer) have a lot more problems with periodontal disease than, say, a Labrador.

The risk factors for cats for periodontal disease include specific breeds (especially Abyssinians), snub nose (Himalayan or Persian) and cats in multi-cat households (due to chronic viral infections).

Think of how uncomfortable you are if you eat popcorn and have a popcorn hull lodged in your gums. Now, magnify that oral pain tenfold, and imagine living with it daily–that’s what pets endure that have periodontal disease.

Elderly pets whose mouths have been neglected have the additional agony of bone infection (osteomyelitis) to deal with.

To make matters worse, the bacteria that cause gingivitis in pets have a particular affinity for the heart, liver and kidneys; the rich blood supply of the gums means every time a pet with periodontal disease eats, drinks, chews, licks,or grooms, he is causing a cascade of bacteria to enter his bloodstream and target those vital organs.

The only health problems that age a pet as fast as periodontal disease are osteoarthritis and cancer.

Good dental care is one of the most loving and beneficial things we can do for our pets! Proper dental health care can:
· Add 3-5 happy years to a dog or cat’s lifespan
· Prevent heart, liver and kidney disease
· Prevent oral pain and BAD BREATH

The good news is that good dental health care doesn’t have to be expensive! Windmill Animal Hospital offers complete dental services for your pet, including dental cleaning/polishing, dental xrays, extractions, and restorative procedures. However, if your pet’s teeth are cleaned on a regular basis, those other services likely won’t be needed!

Call today to get your pet’s dental cleaning scheduled, and see how easily we can help your pet be healthier and more comfortable with an organized dental maintenance plan

TIME FOR PET’S HEARTWORM INJX
Our records show your dog is due for a renewal of his 6-month heartworm prevention injection, ProHeart6. ProHeart6 is a safe, effective way to prevent heartworms and intestinal worms in all dogs. More importantly, dog owners are freed up from the worry of remembering to give oral monthly heartworm preventatives on time.

The active ingredient, moxidectin, is in the same drug family as the monthly oral heartworm preventatives we are already familiar with: Heartgard, Interceptor, and Sentinel. ProHeart6 is simply used differently, employing already tried-and-true technology. The same techniques used to formulate the medicine in DepoProvera 3-month injections for women are used to formulate ProHeart6 6-month injections, allowing a timed release of the medication for complete prevention of heartworms and intestinal worms in dogs.

ProHeart6 is considered more effective than oral monthly heartworm preventatives due to once the injection is administered, the medication will be in the dog’s system for the prescribed 6 months. Oral medications are subject to several variables: did the dog actually eat it, did the dog throw up the medication, was the medication properly absorbed in the digestive tract, etc.

The doctors of Windmill Animal Hospital recommend ProHeart6 6-month heartworm prevention injections for all dogs over 6 months of age.

TIME FOR PET’S LAB WORK
Our records show your pet is due for some diagnostic laboratory blood tests. These tests fall into 4 categories:

  1. Your pet’s previous lab work (such as a pre-anesthetic profile associated with an routine surgical procedure, or bloodwork associated with an illness your pet endured), revealed a POSSIBLE problem. You are being sent this reminder to alert you that it’s time to recheck your pet’s lab work, to verify that there IS or IS NOT a concern with your pet’s internal health. Abnormalities in lab work that commonly show up that need to be double-checked include elevated kidney values, elevated liver values, elevated white blood cell counts, depressed platelet counts, etc. Rechecking your pet’s lab work will indicate whether the abnormality has resolved, or will need to be managed in future.
  2. Your pet has been diagnosed with a chronic medical ailment, such as diabetes or compromised kidney function, and the values need a routine recheck. Routine rechecks, usually twice a year, are critical to proper management of your pet’s chronic health problem, to insure proper management and optimum comfort and longevity for your pet.
  3. Your pet is on long-term anticonvulsant medications, such as phenobarbital or potassium bromide, or is on hormonal supplementation, such as for low thyroid, or is on long-term Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammtant drugs for chronic pain. Serum anticonvulsant medication levels MUST be checked at least annually, as well as a Complete Blood Count and a General Chemistry Panel. If the levels get too low, therefore, ineffective, your pet will start seizing again. If the levels get too high, the anticonvulsant drug becomes dangerous, toxic, and could induce the very seizures it is designed to prevent. The only way to know if the dose of anticonvulsant is correct is to check the serum levels. The only way to make sure the anticonvulsant isn’t causing problems with your pet’s internal organ health is to do blood work. Thyroid and other hormone supplementation must also be checked at least annually–if the dose is too low, your pet will receive no benefit and you will waste your time and money; if the dose is too high, your pet’s health could be seriously harmed. NonSteroidal Anti-Inflammatant Drugs (known as NSAIDs) do a very good job of relieving pain, but they ALL can cause digestive upset, they ALL put stress on the liver, and they ALL lower blood pressure to the kidneys. Therefore, pets on long-term NSAIDs MUST have their liver & kidney health checked at least every 6 months, as well as a complete blod count to verify no chronic blood loss through GIT inflammation.
  4. Your pet is 8 years of age or older, and needs routine blood screens to verify normal internal organ health. All senior pets (8 years +), and, especially geriatric pets (10 years +), should have their internal health assessed via blood work at least annually. The earlier a developing problem is detected, the easier and less expensive it is to manage.

Windmill Animal Hospital has extensive in-house lab test capability; we are able to process most of our patients’ lab testing needs right here at our hospital. This means fast turn-around, and accurate results for you, our client!

Please call or email us today, to discuss your pet’s lab work needs, and get an appointment scheduled.

TIME FOR PET’S NEUTER
Our records indicate that your puppy or kitten is now old enough to be spayed or neutered. In addition, if your pet has retained baby teeth, this is an ideal time to extract them.

Did you know it is now absolutely normal to spay/neuter healthy puppies and kittens between 4 and 6 months of age? Wouldn’t it be nice to spay your puppy before she came in heat? Wouldn’t it be easier to neuter your kitten before he reached puberty and learned how to spray? We can safely anesthetize very young pets now, with the extraordinarily safe gas anesthetics used at Windmill Animal Hospital. In addition, you don’t have to worry about your furry baby being uncomfortable. Safe, comfortable anesthesia and surgery is the name of the game at Windmill Animal Hospital, especially for puppies and kittens. In fact, it is our hospital policy that ALL pets who have surgery receive pre-anesthetic, peri-anesthetic, and post-anesthetic pain control. In addition, our surgical patients go home with up a week of oral pain control medication.

At Windmill Animal Hospital, we recommend that all healthy female dogs be spayed between 5 and 6 months of age. Truth be told, there’s absolutely no need for your female dog to ever have a heat cycle or to have puppies before spaying. Years ago, it was thought a female dog needed to have a litter of puppies to “settle her down,” and help her to be a better pet. . Some very elegant behavioral studies have shown that dogs spayed after having a litter, versus those spayed before reaching puberty, have no significant differences in their behavior and loving temperament.

A huge benefit to early spaying is virtually eliminating your female dog’s risk of developing breast cancer. Dogs get breast cancer 25 times more often than us humans. Dogs spayed before their first heat have a 99% reduced risk of contracting breast cancer. Dogs spayed after their first heat, but before their second heat, have a 95% reduction in their breast cancer risk. Dogs spayed after their second heat have no significant reduction in their risk.

Other benefits to early spaying include faster recovery time for the dog and reduced cost for the owner.

At Windmill Animal Hospital, we also recommend that all healthy male dogs be neutered between 5 and 6 months of age. Neutering a male dog before puberty helps prevent testosterone-related behavior problems, such as hiking the leg in the house, mounting behavior, aggression and inappropriate protectiveness. If your male dog has a retained testicle, it is absolutely critical he be neutered as soon as possible–the retained testicle has a 50% chance of become cancerous by the time he’s two years old.

Many owners don’t realize that their adult male dog can develop serious health problems as he gets older from being unneutered. Did you know male dogs can get 3 different kinds of testicular tumors? The only way to prevent them is through neutering. Also, by the time an intact male dog is 5 years old, he has a 75% chance of having an enlarged prostate gland. By the time he’s 7 years old, his risk is over 90%. Enlarged prostates cause the dog to have to work harder to pass stool. In addition, the dog with an enlarged prostate is at high risk of developing prostatitis, a painful infection of the prostate that can be as life-threatening as appendicitis in humans. The treatment for enlarged prostate, and the only way to prevent enlarged prostate, is neutering.

A commonly-seen dental issue with puppies, especially toy breeds, is retention of baby teeth. These retained baby teeth commonly deflect the normal alignment of the puppy’s permanent teeth, and can cause chronic pain due to malocclusions. Most puppies have erupted their permanent teeth by 5-6 months of age, so any retained baby teeth at that time will need to be manually extracted. Spaying or neutering puppies at 5-6 months of age is the perfect time to extract any retained baby teeth, thereby avoiding 2 anesthetic procedures and the additional cost associated with them.

Call Windmill Animal Hospital for details about early spay or neuter services for your pet!

TIME FOR PET’S RECHECK
Recheck examinations are almost as important as the original exam. The recheck exam, and second interview with you, are how the doctors at Windmill Animal Hospital determine if the prescribed treatment plan is delivering the desired results, or if adjustments need to be made.

Your pet’s recheck physical examination includes:
· checking all vital signs
· examining the teeth/eyes/ears
· listening to the heart & lungs
· palpating the abdomen for any abnormalities
· searching for lumps, bumps, enlarged lymph nodes
· checking the skin and haircoat
· evaluating the pet for gait abnormalities and arthritis

…and then comparing the findings with the original physical examination’s findings. Commonly, follow-up diagnostic tests will be needed, such a repeat urinalysis in case of a urinary tract infection, or a repeat ear cytology with otitis, to verify that the problem is resolving satisfactorily.

Another equally important part of your pet’s recheck examination is the interview with you, his owner. You know your pet better than anyone else, so you are the best source of information for his usual daily habits:
· is eating, drinking, urinating, defecating returning to normal?
· is he playing with his toys yet?
· Has the odor (from ears/mouth/skin/anal glands) reduced or gone away?
· Has his housetraining returned?
· Is he wanting or able to go up the stairs/jump on the bed/jump in the car now?

Our owner questionnaire has many more questions similar to the above list. Armed with this information, plus the information from the recheck physical exam, the doctors of Windmill Animal Hospital can stay on top of health problems in your pet, and make sure the treatment plan selected is delivering a satisfactory response, which means a longer, more comfortable life for your pet, more peace of mind for you, and lower veterinary bills!

TIME FOR PET’S SPAY
Our records indicate that your puppy or kitten is now old enough to be spayed or neutered. In addition, if your pet has retained baby teeth, this is an ideal time to extract them.

Did you know it is now absolutely normal to spay/neuter healthy puppies and kittens between 4 and 6 months of age? Wouldn’t it be nice to spay your puppy before she came in heat? Wouldn’t it be easier to neuter your kitten before he reached puberty and learned how to spray? We can safely anesthetize very young pets now, with the extraordinarily safe gas anesthetics used at Windmill Animal Hospital. In addition, you don’t have to worry about your furry baby being uncomfortable. Safe, comfortable anesthesia and surgery is the name of the game at Windmill Animal Hospital, especially for puppies and kittens. In fact, it is our hospital policy that ALL pets who have surgery receive pre-anesthetic, peri-anesthetic, and post-anesthetic pain control. In addition, our surgical patients go home with up a week of oral pain control medication.

At Windmill Animal Hospital, we recommend that all healthy female dogs be spayed between 5 and 6 months of age. Truth be told, there’s absolutely no need for your female dog to ever have a heat cycle or to have puppies before spaying. Years ago, it was thought a female dog needed to have a litter of puppies to “settle her down,” and help her to be a better pet. . Some very elegant behavioral studies have shown that dogs spayed after having a litter, versus those spayed before reaching puberty, have no significant differences in their behavior and loving temperament.

A huge benefit to early spaying is virtually eliminating your female dog’s risk of developing breast cancer. Dogs get breast cancer 25 times more often than us humans. Dogs spayed before their first heat have a 99% reduced risk of contracting breast cancer. Dogs spayed after their first heat, but before their second heat, have a 95% reduction in their breast cancer risk. Dogs spayed after their second heat have no significant reduction in their risk.

Other benefits to early spaying include faster recovery time for the dog and reduced cost for the owner.

At Windmill Animal Hospital, we also recommend that all healthy male dogs be neutered between 5 and 6 months of age. Neutering a male dog before puberty helps prevent testosterone-related behavior problems, such as hiking the leg in the house, mounting behavior, aggression and inappropriate protectiveness. If your male dog has a retained testicle, it is absolutely critical he be neutered as soon as possible–the retained testicle has a 50% chance of become cancerous by the time he’s two years old.

Many owners don’t realize that their adult male dog can develop serious health problems as he gets older from being unneutered. Did you know male dogs can get 3 different kinds of testicular tumors? The only way to prevent them is through neutering. Also, by the time an intact male dog is 5 years old, he has a 75% chance of having an enlarged prostate gland. By the time he’s 7 years old, his risk is over 90%. Enlarged prostates cause the dog to have to work harder to pass stool. In addition, the dog with an enlarged prostate is at high risk of developing prostatitis, a painful infection of the prostate that can be as life-threatening as appendicitis in humans. The treatment for enlarged prostate, and the only way to prevent enlarged prostate, is neutering.

A commonly-seen dental issue with puppies, especially toy breeds, is retention of baby teeth. These retained baby teeth commonly deflect the normal alignment of the puppy’s permanent teeth, and can cause chronic pain due to malocclusions. Most puppies have erupted their permanent teeth by 5-6 months of age, so any retained baby teeth at that time will need to be manually extracted. Spaying or neutering puppies at 5-6 months of age is the perfect time to extract any retained baby teeth, thereby avoiding 2 anesthetic procedures and the additional cost associated with them.

Call Windmill Animal Hospital for details about early spay or neuter services for your pet!

TIME FOR PET’S SURGERY
Your pet has been diagnosed by one of the doctors at Windmill Animal Hospital as having a medical concern that needs to be resolved via surgery, or an elective surgery that you’ve discussed with one of our doctors that needs to be scheduled.. The most common reasons for a pet to need surgery, excluding spay/neuter, is to remove a lump or bump, surgical correction of an orthopedic problem such as a ruptured Cranial Cruciate Ligament, or to repair a hernia. Elective procedures include dewclaw removal, stenotic nares correction, and other procedures that will help your pet’s comfort and longevity. There are many other conditions that also require surgery to resolve. This reminder was sent to you to help you remember to get your pet scheduled!
TIME FOR PET’S X-RAYS
Our records indicate that it is time to take some radiographic images of your pet. The most common reasons we need to do xrays of your pet are: follow-up xrays to track healing of a fracture, survey xrays of hips and/or elbows to screen for dysplasia, and late pregnancy xrays to assess the number and size of puppies or kittens in the upcoming litter. Since Windmill Animal Hospital has a complete digital xray system, your pet’s xray images will be clear, detailed, and available for viewing within 2 minutes of the exposure. In addition, we provide a cd-rom to go home with you, with your pet’s radiographic images burned onto it.

Fractured bones take 6-8 weeks to heal properly, sometimes longer. The only way to verify a pet’s bone has healed adequately to allow removal of a splint or resumption of normal activities is doing an xray. The usual tracking interval to assess fracture healing is every 2-4 weeks, depending on the type and extent of the fracture. If the healing progress is unsatisfactory, the management of the fracture can be changed before irreparable damage has occurred. If the fracture heals faster than expected, any external fixator devices or splints can be removed in a timely manner, before THEY cause long-term harm.

We highly encourage all clients who own large-breed puppies to have survey xrays done of their pups’ hips and elbows between 6 and 12 months of age; commonly, these imaging studies are timed for when the puppy is under anesthesia to be spayed or neutered. If a pup is affected with hip dysplasia or elbow dysplasia, the sooner we know, the sooner management can be started to help slow down or prevent joint damage. Again, the only reliable method of assessing the conformation of a puppy’s hips or elbows is through xray imaging.

Taking an xray of your dog or cat when late in pregnancy will indicate how many little ones to expect, and help reveal if there are any obvious problems, such as over-sized puppies or an abnormally small pelvic canal. Knowing how many puppies/kittens are coming, and if there are any size concerns, can help your Windmill Animal Hospital doctor and you make decisions about whether to allow your dog or cat to go into labor, or to consider an electvie cesarean section.

TIME FOR PUPPIES’ FIRST VACCINES
It’s very important for puppies and kittens to receive a thorough exam each time they come in for routine puppy or kitten vaccines. They should receive their first exam and initial vaccines between 6 and 8 weeks of age. Your veterinarian will check for birth defects, developmental concerns, retained baby teeth, retained testicles, and hernias, among other concerns.–as well as help advise you on housetraining, leash training, feeding schedules and all the millions of questions that come up when you’re raising a puppy or kitten.

Your puppy or kitten’s physical examination includes:
· checking all vital signs
· examining the teeth/eyes/ears
· listening to the heart & lungs
· palpating the abdomen for any abnormalities
· searching for lumps, bumps, enlarged lymph nodes
· checking the skin and haircoat
· evaluating the pet for gait abnormalities and arthritis.

Another equally important part of your pet’s examination is the interview with you, his owner. You know your pet better than anyone else, so you are the best source of information for his usual daily habits:
· how much is he eating, drinking, urinating, defecating?
· Does he play with his toys?
· Have you noticed an odor lately?
· How is his housetraining?
· Can he go up the stairs/jump on the bed/jump in the car?

Our owner questionnaire has many more questions similar to the above list. Armed with this information, plus the information from the physical exam, the doctors of Windmill Animal Hospital can diagnose developmental concerns and health problems in your pet early, which means a longer, more comfortable life for your pet, more peace of mind for you, and lower veterinary bills!

TIME FOR THYROID PROFILE
Our records show your pet is due for some diagnostic laboratory blood tests. These tests fall into 4 categories:

  1. Your pet’s previous lab work (such as a pre-anesthetic profile associated with an routine surgical procedure, or bloodwork associated with an illness your pet endured, or a previous urinary tract infection), revealed a POSSIBLE problem. You are being sent this reminder to alert you that it’s time to recheck your pet’s lab work, to verify that there IS or IS NOT a concern with your pet’s internal health. Abnormalities in lab work that commonly show up that need to be double-checked include elevated kidney values, elevated liver values, elevated white blood cell counts, depressed platelet counts, urinary tract infections/crystals, etc. Rechecking your pet’s lab work will indicate whether the abnormality has resolved, or will need to be managed in future.
  2. Your pet has been diagnosed with a chronic medical ailment, such as diabetes or compromised kidney function, and the values need a routine recheck. Routine rechecks, usually twice a year, are critical to proper management of your pet’s chronic health problem, to insure proper management and optimum comfort and longevity for your pet.
  3. Your pet is on long-term anticonvulsant medications, such as phenobarbital or potassium bromide, or is on hormonal supplementation, such as for low thyroid, or is on long-term Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammtant drugs for chronic pain. Serum anticonvulsant medication levels MUST be checked at least annually, as well as a Complete Blood Count and a General Chemistry Panel. If the levels get too low, therefore, ineffective, your pet will start seizing again. If the levels get too high, the anticonvulsant drug becomes dangerous, toxic, and could induce the very seizures it is designed to prevent. The only way to know if the dose of anticonvulsant is correct is to check the serum levels. The only way to make sure the anticonvulsant isn’t causing problems with your pet’s internal organ health is to do blood work. Thyroid and other hormone supplementation must also be checked at least annually–if the dose is too low, your pet will receive no benefit and you will waste your time and money; if the dose is too high, your pet’s health could be seriously harmed. NonSteroidal Anti-Inflammatant Drugs (known as NSAIDs) do a very good job of relieving pain, but they ALL can cause digestive upset, they ALL put stress on the liver, and they ALL lower blood pressure to the kidneys. Therefore, pets on long-term NSAIDs MUST have their liver & kidney health checked at least every 6 months, as well as a complete blod count to verify no chronic blood loss through GIT inflammation.
  4. Your pet is 8 years of age or older, and needs routine blood screens to verify normal internal organ health. All senior pets (8 years +), and, especially geriatric pets (10 years +), should have their internal health assessed via blood work at least annually. The earlier a developing problem is detected, the easier and less expensive it is to manage.

Windmill Animal Hospital has extensive in-house lab test capability; we are able to process most of our patients’ lab testing needs right here at our hospital. This means fast turn-around, and accurate results for you, our client!

Please call or email us today, to discuss your pet’s lab work needs, and get an appointment scheduled.

TIME TO CHANGE PET’S SPLINT
Our records indicate that it is time to change your pet’s splint.

External fixators, or splints, are commonly applied used to allow healing of a long bone fracture in a dog or cat. Since pets can’t speak, they can’t tell us if their splint is causing a pressure sore, dermatitis, or loss of circulation. Therefore, it is critically important to frequently change the splint, to allow a visual assessment of the health of the splinted leg. In addition, follow-up xrays are best taken without a splint in the way. The usual splint changing interval is 1-2 weeks, depending on the age of the pet, the type and location of the splint, and how well the pet is tolerating the splint. In addition, if the pet chews the splint or the splint gets wet or shows a discharge coming through the wrapping, it must be changed IMMEDIATELY.

TIME TO CHECK PUPS FOR WORMS
All pet owners, and most pets, ask the same question: what’s with this fascination with my dog/cat’s poop? Why do we have to keep checking it? What’s the big deal if we don’t check it? These are very valid questions, because acquiring a stool sample, whether via the owner picking up a specimen in the yard, or direct acquisition from the pet, is not a pleasant task for anyone!

Stool samples are the specimens we need to check your pet for intestinal parasites. The intestinal parasites we check for include:
· Roundworms
· Hookworms
· Whipworms
· Tapeworms
· Coccidia
· Giardia.

Your dog or cat can get exposed to these parasites in a variety of ways. If your dog or cat is allowed to roam, it could get exposed anywhere an infected pet has defecated (ever seen a dog or cat carefully checking out someone else’s poop?) In addition, your backyard could already be contaminated by a previous occupant’s pets. Another possibility is stray cats and wildlife crossing through your yard at night, and leaving their “calling cards.”

Puppies and kittens get intestinal worms from their mothers, through the placenta and the first milk. The first stool check should be done when the litter of puppies or kittens is about 4 weeks of age, and every 2-4 weeks after that until there are TWO negative stool checks in a row.

On the average, 21% of adult dogs and cats are infested with at least one of the above parasites at any one time. Intestinal parasites can cause upset stomach, vomiting, bloating, diarrhea, increased frequency & volume of defecation, flatulence, housetraining problems, coat/skin problems, and general misery for your pet. Indoor pets can be infested, too: we can track in contaminated mud on our shoes; Giardia sporocysts can literally blow in on the wind. No pet is completely safe from being exposed to intestinal parasites.

Unfortunately, 3 of the above parasites can infect people: Roundworms, Hookworms, and Giardia. Roundworm larvae cause seizures and blindness in children. Hookworm larvae cause cutaneous larval migrans, a skin disorder, and visceral larval migrans, a chronic form of gastroenteritis, in children and adults. Giardiasis is better known by some of its more popular names: Touristas, or Montezuma’s Revenge. People get exposed to these parasites when they live and play in the same premises as an infected pet–the yard gets seeded with worm eggs & larvae, as well as Giardia sporocysts. Fecal contamination on pets’ fur can contaminate human hands; failure to properly wash hands can mean direct ingestion of parasites.

Intestinal parasites are a big problem wherever pets live in a warm, humid environment. Since most of us have back yards with sprinklers, our pets live in the perfect environment to be exposed to (and expose us to) parasites. Because dogs and cats can be exposed to and acquire intestinal parasites at any time, we must routinely check their stools. Maintaining control of intestinal parasites in an ongoing battle.

The National Council on Parasitism and the American College of Veterinary Parasitologists recommends we check all dogs and cats for intestinal parasites twice yearly. They recommend we check puppies and kittens monthly until 6 months of age. In addition, because monthly oral heartworm preventativessuch as Interceptor and Sentinel for dogs, and Revolution for cats, help reduce the incidence of intestinal parasitism, all dogs and cats should be maintained year-round on these products.

TIME TO EXTRACT BABY TEETH
Our records indicate that your puppy or kitten is now old enough to be spayed or neutered. In addition, if your pet has retained baby teeth, this is an ideal time to extract them.

Did you know it is now absolutely normal to spay/neuter healthy puppies and kittens between 4 and 6 months of age? Wouldn’t it be nice to spay your puppy before she came in heat? Wouldn’t it be easier to neuter your kitten before he reached puberty and learned how to spray? We can safely anesthetize very young pets now, with the extraordinarily safe gas anesthetics used at Windmill Animal Hospital. In addition, you don’t have to worry about your furry baby being uncomfortable. Safe, comfortable anesthesia and surgery is the name of the game at Windmill Animal Hospital, especially for puppies and kittens. In fact, it is our hospital policy that ALL pets who have surgery receive pre-anesthetic, peri-anesthetic, and post-anesthetic pain control. In addition, our surgical patients go home with up a week of oral pain control medication.

At Windmill Animal Hospital, we recommend that all healthy female dogs be spayed between 5 and 6 months of age. Truth be told, there’s absolutely no need for your female dog to ever have a heat cycle or to have puppies before spaying. Years ago, it was thought a female dog needed to have a litter of puppies to “settle her down,” and help her to be a better pet. . Some very elegant behavioral studies have shown that dogs spayed after having a litter, versus those spayed before reaching puberty, have no significant differences in their behavior and loving temperament.

A huge benefit to early spaying is virtually eliminating your female dog’s risk of developing breast cancer. Dogs get breast cancer 25 times more often than us humans. Dogs spayed before their first heat have a 99% reduced risk of contracting breast cancer. Dogs spayed after their first heat, but before their second heat, have a 95% reduction in their breast cancer risk. Dogs spayed after their second heat have no significant reduction in their risk.

Other benefits to early spaying include faster recovery time for the dog and reduced cost for the owner.

At Windmill Animal Hospital, we also recommend that all healthy male dogs be neutered between 5 and 6 months of age. Neutering a male dog before puberty helps prevent testosterone-related behavior problems, such as hiking the leg in the house, mounting behavior, aggression and inappropriate protectiveness. If your male dog has a retained testicle, it is absolutely critical he be neutered as soon as possible–the retained testicle has a 50% chance of become cancerous by the time he’s two years old.

Many owners don’t realize that their adult male dog can develop serious health problems as he gets older from being unneutered. Did you know male dogs can get 3 different kinds of testicular tumors? The only way to prevent them is through neutering. Also, by the time an intact male dog is 5 years old, he has a 75% chance of having an enlarged prostate gland. By the time he’s 7 years old, his risk is over 90%. Enlarged prostates cause the dog to have to work harder to pass stool. In addition, the dog with an enlarged prostate is at high risk of developing prostatitis, a painful infection of the prostate that can be as life-threatening as appendicitis in humans. The treatment for enlarged prostate, and the only way to prevent enlarged prostate, is neutering.

A commonly-seen dental issue with puppies, especially toy breeds, is retention of baby teeth. These retained baby teeth commonly deflect the normal alignment of the puppy’s permanent teeth, and can cause chronic pain due to malocclusions. Most puppies have erupted their permanent teeth by 5-6 months of age, so any retained baby teeth at that time will need to be manually extracted. Spaying or neutering puppies at 5-6 months of age is the perfect time to extract any retained baby teeth, thereby avoiding 2 anesthetic procedures and the additional cost associated with them.

Call Windmill Animal Hospital for details about early spay or neuter services for your pet!

TIME TO REWEIGH YOUR PET!!
Our records indicate it’s time to re-weigh your pet.

Weight management is critical for your pet’s comfort and logevity. Obese pets are at risk for diabetes, kidney problems, hypertension, liver problems and all kinds of orthopedic problems, ranging from “simple” osteoarthritis to ruptured Anterior Cruciate Ligaments to ruptured discs in their backs. In addition, obese pets have a 100% increased risk of cancer!

Regular weigh-ins of your pet helps insure that the weight management program custom-designed for your pet by one of the doctors at Windmill Animal Hospital is effective. Weigh-ins also make sure that your pet isn’t losing weight TOO fast–crash diets are just as uncomfortable for pets as they are for people!

Pets on a weight-management program should be re-weighed at least monthly. Your are welcome to come by any time during regular business hours to weigh your pet on one of our digital scales; we will record the new weight in your pet’s record for you, so no need to worry about writing it down!

TIME TO SCHEDULE PET’S SURGERY
Your pet has been diagnosed by one of the doctors at Windmill Animal Hospital as having a medical concern that needs to be resolved via surgery, or an elective surgery that you’ve discussed with one of our doctors that needs to be scheduled.. The most common reasons for a pet to need surgery, excluding spay/neuter, is to remove a lump or bump, surgical correction of an orthopedic problem such as a ruptured Cranial Cruciate Ligament, or to repair a hernia. Elective procedures include dewclaw removal, stenotic nares correction, and other procedures that will help your pet’s comfort and longevity. There are many other conditions that also require surgery to resolve. This reminder was sent to you to help you remember to get your pet scheduled!
Trifexis, dogs 5-10 lbs, 6 pack
Our records show your dog needs a refill of monthly heartworm, flea and tick preventative. All dogs living in Texas are at risk for an infestation of fleas and ticks. We are familiar with the misery fleas can cause–itching, chewing, scratching, hair loss & dermatitis. Fleas can also carry parasites, such as tapeworms. Did you know that your dog can get anemic from a heavy flea infestation? Severe flea infestations can cause a life-threatening anemia.

Trifexis is a monthly, chewable tablet for dogs that kills fleas, prevents heartworm disease, and treats and controls adult hookworm, roundworm and whipworm infections. Trifexis combines two trusted active ingredients to provide protection for your dog against these three kinds of dangerous parasites.

And Trifexis is a flavored, chewable tablet that can be offered as a treat.
Trifexis is not for use in dogs with a history of seizures, or with impaired liver function.

Convenience. Proven effectiveness.  All in one chewable tablet.
Benefits of Trifexis:

  • Kills fleas and prevents infestations
  • Prevents heartworm disease
  • Treats and controls intestinal parasite infections (hookworm, roundworm, whipworm)
  • One easy-to-administer chewable tablet

With Trifexis, you can play with your dog immediately after treatment. There is no need to isolate your pet, as with topical products. Just treat and play!

Trifexis is an ideal choice for:
<ul”>

  • Families with children or other pets, since there is no transfer of product through contact
  • Anyone worried about staining carpeting, clothing or furniture
  • Dogs that swim or are bathed frequently
  • Dogs with dermatological (skin) conditions requiring topical therapy

Green Chemistry

The introduction of spinosad for use in agriculture resulted in the receipt of a Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge Award in 1999 from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The award was presented to Dow Agro Sciences LLC in the category of Designing Safer Chemicals for the introduction of spinosad as an insect control product for use on crops. This award demonstrates that spinosad, as a technology for insect control, has a favorable environmental profile. This award is not relevant to the safety and efficacy of Trifexis, nor does it confer any environmental benefit to Trifexis.

Trifexis, dogs 5-10 lbs, single
Our records show your dog needs a refill of monthly heartworm, flea and tick preventative. All dogs living in Texas are at risk for an infestation of fleas and ticks. We are familiar with the misery fleas can cause–itching, chewing, scratching, hair loss & dermatitis. Fleas can also carry parasites, such as tapeworms. Did you know that your dog can get anemic from a heavy flea infestation? Severe flea infestations can cause a life-threatening anemia.

Trifexis is a monthly, chewable tablet for dogs that kills fleas, prevents heartworm disease, and treats and controls adult hookworm, roundworm and whipworm infections. Trifexis combines two trusted active ingredients to provide protection for your dog against these three kinds of dangerous parasites.

And Trifexis is a flavored, chewable tablet that can be offered as a treat.
Trifexis is not for use in dogs with a history of seizures, or with impaired liver function.

Convenience. Proven effectiveness.  All in one chewable tablet.
Benefits of Trifexis:

  • Kills fleas and prevents infestations
  • Prevents heartworm disease
  • Treats and controls intestinal parasite infections (hookworm, roundworm, whipworm)
  • One easy-to-administer chewable tablet

With Trifexis, you can play with your dog immediately after treatment. There is no need to isolate your pet, as with topical products. Just treat and play!

Trifexis is an ideal choice for:
<ul”>

  • Families with children or other pets, since there is no transfer of product through contact
  • Anyone worried about staining carpeting, clothing or furniture
  • Dogs that swim or are bathed frequently
  • Dogs with dermatological (skin) conditions requiring topical therapy

Green Chemistry

The introduction of spinosad for use in agriculture resulted in the receipt of a Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge Award in 1999 from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The award was presented to Dow Agro Sciences LLC in the category of Designing Safer Chemicals for the introduction of spinosad as an insect control product for use on crops. This award demonstrates that spinosad, as a technology for insect control, has a favorable environmental profile. This award is not relevant to the safety and efficacy of Trifexis, nor does it confer any environmental benefit to Trifexis.

Trifexis, dogs 10.1-20.0 lbs, 6 pack
Our records show your dog needs a refill of monthly heartworm, flea and tick preventative. All dogs living in Texas are at risk for an infestation of fleas and ticks. We are familiar with the misery fleas can cause–itching, chewing, scratching, hair loss & dermatitis. Fleas can also carry parasites, such as tapeworms. Did you know that your dog can get anemic from a heavy flea infestation? Severe flea infestations can cause a life-threatening anemia.

Trifexis is a monthly, chewable tablet for dogs that kills fleas, prevents heartworm disease, and treats and controls adult hookworm, roundworm and whipworm infections. Trifexis combines two trusted active ingredients to provide protection for your dog against these three kinds of dangerous parasites.

And Trifexis is a flavored, chewable tablet that can be offered as a treat.
Trifexis is not for use in dogs with a history of seizures, or with impaired liver function.

Convenience. Proven effectiveness.  All in one chewable tablet.
Benefits of Trifexis:

  • Kills fleas and prevents infestations
  • Prevents heartworm disease
  • Treats and controls intestinal parasite infections (hookworm, roundworm, whipworm)
  • One easy-to-administer chewable tablet

With Trifexis, you can play with your dog immediately after treatment. There is no need to isolate your pet, as with topical products. Just treat and play!

Trifexis is an ideal choice for:
<ul”>

  • Families with children or other pets, since there is no transfer of product through contact
  • Anyone worried about staining carpeting, clothing or furniture
  • Dogs that swim or are bathed frequently
  • Dogs with dermatological (skin) conditions requiring topical therapy

Green Chemistry

The introduction of spinosad for use in agriculture resulted in the receipt of a Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge Award in 1999 from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The award was presented to Dow Agro Sciences LLC in the category of Designing Safer Chemicals for the introduction of spinosad as an insect control product for use on crops. This award demonstrates that spinosad, as a technology for insect control, has a favorable environmental profile. This award is not relevant to the safety and efficacy of Trifexis, nor does it confer any environmental benefit to Trifexis.

Trifexis, dogs 10.1-20.0 lbs, single
Our records show your dog needs a refill of monthly heartworm, flea and tick preventative. All dogs living in Texas are at risk for an infestation of fleas and ticks. We are familiar with the misery fleas can cause–itching, chewing, scratching, hair loss & dermatitis. Fleas can also carry parasites, such as tapeworms. Did you know that your dog can get anemic from a heavy flea infestation? Severe flea infestations can cause a life-threatening anemia.

Trifexis is a monthly, chewable tablet for dogs that kills fleas, prevents heartworm disease, and treats and controls adult hookworm, roundworm and whipworm infections. Trifexis combines two trusted active ingredients to provide protection for your dog against these three kinds of dangerous parasites.

And Trifexis is a flavored, chewable tablet that can be offered as a treat.
Trifexis is not for use in dogs with a history of seizures, or with impaired liver function.

Convenience. Proven effectiveness.  All in one chewable tablet.
Benefits of Trifexis:

  • Kills fleas and prevents infestations
  • Prevents heartworm disease
  • Treats and controls intestinal parasite infections (hookworm, roundworm, whipworm)
  • One easy-to-administer chewable tablet

With Trifexis, you can play with your dog immediately after treatment. There is no need to isolate your pet, as with topical products. Just treat and play!

Trifexis is an ideal choice for:
<ul”>

  • Families with children or other pets, since there is no transfer of product through contact
  • Anyone worried about staining carpeting, clothing or furniture
  • Dogs that swim or are bathed frequently
  • Dogs with dermatological (skin) conditions requiring topical therapy

Green Chemistry

The introduction of spinosad for use in agriculture resulted in the receipt of a Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge Award in 1999 from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The award was presented to Dow Agro Sciences LLC in the category of Designing Safer Chemicals for the introduction of spinosad as an insect control product for use on crops. This award demonstrates that spinosad, as a technology for insect control, has a favorable environmental profile. This award is not relevant to the safety and efficacy of Trifexis, nor does it confer any environmental benefit to Trifexis.

Trifexis, dogs 20.1-40.0 lbs, 6 pack
Our records show your dog needs a refill of monthly heartworm, flea and tick preventative. All dogs living in Texas are at risk for an infestation of fleas and ticks. We are familiar with the misery fleas can cause–itching, chewing, scratching, hair loss & dermatitis. Fleas can also carry parasites, such as tapeworms. Did you know that your dog can get anemic from a heavy flea infestation? Severe flea infestations can cause a life-threatening anemia.

Trifexis is a monthly, chewable tablet for dogs that kills fleas, prevents heartworm disease, and treats and controls adult hookworm, roundworm and whipworm infections. Trifexis combines two trusted active ingredients to provide protection for your dog against these three kinds of dangerous parasites.

And Trifexis is a flavored, chewable tablet that can be offered as a treat.
Trifexis is not for use in dogs with a history of seizures, or with impaired liver function.

Convenience. Proven effectiveness.  All in one chewable tablet.
Benefits of Trifexis:

  • Kills fleas and prevents infestations
  • Prevents heartworm disease
  • Treats and controls intestinal parasite infections (hookworm, roundworm, whipworm)
  • One easy-to-administer chewable tablet

With Trifexis, you can play with your dog immediately after treatment. There is no need to isolate your pet, as with topical products. Just treat and play!

Trifexis is an ideal choice for:
<ul”>

  • Families with children or other pets, since there is no transfer of product through contact
  • Anyone worried about staining carpeting, clothing or furniture
  • Dogs that swim or are bathed frequently
  • Dogs with dermatological (skin) conditions requiring topical therapy

Green Chemistry

The introduction of spinosad for use in agriculture resulted in the receipt of a Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge Award in 1999 from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The award was presented to Dow Agro Sciences LLC in the category of Designing Safer Chemicals for the introduction of spinosad as an insect control product for use on crops. This award demonstrates that spinosad, as a technology for insect control, has a favorable environmental profile. This award is not relevant to the safety and efficacy of Trifexis, nor does it confer any environmental benefit to Trifexis.

Trifexis, dogs 20.1-40.0 lbs, single
Our records show your dog needs a refill of monthly heartworm, flea and tick preventative. All dogs living in Texas are at risk for an infestation of fleas and ticks. We are familiar with the misery fleas can cause–itching, chewing, scratching, hair loss & dermatitis. Fleas can also carry parasites, such as tapeworms. Did you know that your dog can get anemic from a heavy flea infestation? Severe flea infestations can cause a life-threatening anemia.

Trifexis is a monthly, chewable tablet for dogs that kills fleas, prevents heartworm disease, and treats and controls adult hookworm, roundworm and whipworm infections. Trifexis combines two trusted active ingredients to provide protection for your dog against these three kinds of dangerous parasites.

And Trifexis is a flavored, chewable tablet that can be offered as a treat.
Trifexis is not for use in dogs with a history of seizures, or with impaired liver function.

Convenience. Proven effectiveness.  All in one chewable tablet.
Benefits of Trifexis:

  • Kills fleas and prevents infestations
  • Prevents heartworm disease
  • Treats and controls intestinal parasite infections (hookworm, roundworm, whipworm)
  • One easy-to-administer chewable tablet

With Trifexis, you can play with your dog immediately after treatment. There is no need to isolate your pet, as with topical products. Just treat and play!

Trifexis is an ideal choice for:
<ul”>

  • Families with children or other pets, since there is no transfer of product through contact
  • Anyone worried about staining carpeting, clothing or furniture
  • Dogs that swim or are bathed frequently
  • Dogs with dermatological (skin) conditions requiring topical therapy

Green Chemistry

The introduction of spinosad for use in agriculture resulted in the receipt of a Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge Award in 1999 from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The award was presented to Dow Agro Sciences LLC in the category of Designing Safer Chemicals for the introduction of spinosad as an insect control product for use on crops. This award demonstrates that spinosad, as a technology for insect control, has a favorable environmental profile. This award is not relevant to the safety and efficacy of Trifexis, nor does it confer any environmental benefit to Trifexis.

Trifexis, dogs 40.1- 60.0 lbs, 6 pack
Our records show your dog needs a refill of monthly heartworm, flea and tick preventative. All dogs living in Texas are at risk for an infestation of fleas and ticks. We are familiar with the misery fleas can cause–itching, chewing, scratching, hair loss & dermatitis. Fleas can also carry parasites, such as tapeworms. Did you know that your dog can get anemic from a heavy flea infestation? Severe flea infestations can cause a life-threatening anemia.

Trifexis is a monthly, chewable tablet for dogs that kills fleas, prevents heartworm disease, and treats and controls adult hookworm, roundworm and whipworm infections. Trifexis combines two trusted active ingredients to provide protection for your dog against these three kinds of dangerous parasites.

And Trifexis is a flavored, chewable tablet that can be offered as a treat.
Trifexis is not for use in dogs with a history of seizures, or with impaired liver function.

Convenience. Proven effectiveness.  All in one chewable tablet.
Benefits of Trifexis:

  • Kills fleas and prevents infestations
  • Prevents heartworm disease
  • Treats and controls intestinal parasite infections (hookworm, roundworm, whipworm)
  • One easy-to-administer chewable tablet

With Trifexis, you can play with your dog immediately after treatment. There is no need to isolate your pet, as with topical products. Just treat and play!

Trifexis is an ideal choice for:
<ul”>

  • Families with children or other pets, since there is no transfer of product through contact
  • Anyone worried about staining carpeting, clothing or furniture
  • Dogs that swim or are bathed frequently
  • Dogs with dermatological (skin) conditions requiring topical therapy

Green Chemistry

The introduction of spinosad for use in agriculture resulted in the receipt of a Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge Award in 1999 from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The award was presented to Dow Agro Sciences LLC in the category of Designing Safer Chemicals for the introduction of spinosad as an insect control product for use on crops. This award demonstrates that spinosad, as a technology for insect control, has a favorable environmental profile. This award is not relevant to the safety and efficacy of Trifexis, nor does it confer any environmental benefit to Trifexis.

Trifexis, dogs 40.1-60.0 lbs, single
Our records show your dog needs a refill of monthly heartworm, flea and tick preventative. All dogs living in Texas are at risk for an infestation of fleas and ticks. We are familiar with the misery fleas can cause–itching, chewing, scratching, hair loss & dermatitis. Fleas can also carry parasites, such as tapeworms. Did you know that your dog can get anemic from a heavy flea infestation? Severe flea infestations can cause a life-threatening anemia.

Trifexis is a monthly, chewable tablet for dogs that kills fleas, prevents heartworm disease, and treats and controls adult hookworm, roundworm and whipworm infections. Trifexis combines two trusted active ingredients to provide protection for your dog against these three kinds of dangerous parasites.

And Trifexis is a flavored, chewable tablet that can be offered as a treat.
Trifexis is not for use in dogs with a history of seizures, or with impaired liver function.

Convenience. Proven effectiveness.  All in one chewable tablet.
Benefits of Trifexis:

  • Kills fleas and prevents infestations
  • Prevents heartworm disease
  • Treats and controls intestinal parasite infections (hookworm, roundworm, whipworm)
  • One easy-to-administer chewable tablet

With Trifexis, you can play with your dog immediately after treatment. There is no need to isolate your pet, as with topical products. Just treat and play!

Trifexis is an ideal choice for:
<ul”>

  • Families with children or other pets, since there is no transfer of product through contact
  • Anyone worried about staining carpeting, clothing or furniture
  • Dogs that swim or are bathed frequently
  • Dogs with dermatological (skin) conditions requiring topical therapy

Green Chemistry

The introduction of spinosad for use in agriculture resulted in the receipt of a Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge Award in 1999 from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The award was presented to Dow Agro Sciences LLC in the category of Designing Safer Chemicals for the introduction of spinosad as an insect control product for use on crops. This award demonstrates that spinosad, as a technology for insect control, has a favorable environmental profile. This award is not relevant to the safety and efficacy of Trifexis, nor does it confer any environmental benefit to Trifexis.

Trifexis, dogs 60.1-120.0 lbs, 6 pack
Our records show your dog needs a refill of monthly heartworm, flea and tick preventative. All dogs living in Texas are at risk for an infestation of fleas and ticks. We are familiar with the misery fleas can cause–itching, chewing, scratching, hair loss & dermatitis. Fleas can also carry parasites, such as tapeworms. Did you know that your dog can get anemic from a heavy flea infestation? Severe flea infestations can cause a life-threatening anemia.

Trifexis is a monthly, chewable tablet for dogs that kills fleas, prevents heartworm disease, and treats and controls adult hookworm, roundworm and whipworm infections. Trifexis combines two trusted active ingredients to provide protection for your dog against these three kinds of dangerous parasites.

And Trifexis is a flavored, chewable tablet that can be offered as a treat.
Trifexis is not for use in dogs with a history of seizures, or with impaired liver function.

Convenience. Proven effectiveness.  All in one chewable tablet.
Benefits of Trifexis:

  • Kills fleas and prevents infestations
  • Prevents heartworm disease
  • Treats and controls intestinal parasite infections (hookworm, roundworm, whipworm)
  • One easy-to-administer chewable tablet

With Trifexis, you can play with your dog immediately after treatment. There is no need to isolate your pet, as with topical products. Just treat and play!

Trifexis is an ideal choice for:
<ul”>

  • Families with children or other pets, since there is no transfer of product through contact
  • Anyone worried about staining carpeting, clothing or furniture
  • Dogs that swim or are bathed frequently
  • Dogs with dermatological (skin) conditions requiring topical therapy

Green Chemistry

The introduction of spinosad for use in agriculture resulted in the receipt of a Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge Award in 1999 from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The award was presented to Dow Agro Sciences LLC in the category of Designing Safer Chemicals for the introduction of spinosad as an insect control product for use on crops. This award demonstrates that spinosad, as a technology for insect control, has a favorable environmental profile. This award is not relevant to the safety and efficacy of Trifexis, nor does it confer any environmental benefit to Trifexis.

Trifexis, dogs 60.1-120.0 lbs, single
Our records show your dog needs a refill of monthly heartworm, flea and tick preventative. All dogs living in Texas are at risk for an infestation of fleas and ticks. We are familiar with the misery fleas can cause–itching, chewing, scratching, hair loss & dermatitis. Fleas can also carry parasites, such as tapeworms. Did you know that your dog can get anemic from a heavy flea infestation? Severe flea infestations can cause a life-threatening anemia.

Trifexis is a monthly, chewable tablet for dogs that kills fleas, prevents heartworm disease, and treats and controls adult hookworm, roundworm and whipworm infections. Trifexis combines two trusted active ingredients to provide protection for your dog against these three kinds of dangerous parasites.

And Trifexis is a flavored, chewable tablet that can be offered as a treat.
Trifexis is not for use in dogs with a history of seizures, or with impaired liver function.

Convenience. Proven effectiveness.  All in one chewable tablet.
Benefits of Trifexis:

  • Kills fleas and prevents infestations
  • Prevents heartworm disease
  • Treats and controls intestinal parasite infections (hookworm, roundworm, whipworm)
  • One easy-to-administer chewable tablet

With Trifexis, you can play with your dog immediately after treatment. There is no need to isolate your pet, as with topical products. Just treat and play!

Trifexis is an ideal choice for:
<ul”>

  • Families with children or other pets, since there is no transfer of product through contact
  • Anyone worried about staining carpeting, clothing or furniture
  • Dogs that swim or are bathed frequently
  • Dogs with dermatological (skin) conditions requiring topical therapy

Green Chemistry

The introduction of spinosad for use in agriculture resulted in the receipt of a Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge Award in 1999 from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The award was presented to Dow Agro Sciences LLC in the category of Designing Safer Chemicals for the introduction of spinosad as an insect control product for use on crops. This award demonstrates that spinosad, as a technology for insect control, has a favorable environmental profile. This award is not relevant to the safety and efficacy of Trifexis, nor does it confer any environmental benefit to Trifexis.

URINALYSIS (STRIP & SEDIMENT)
Our records show your pet is due for some diagnostic laboratory blood tests. These tests fall into 4 categories:

  1. Your pet’s previous lab work (such as a pre-anesthetic profile associated with an routine surgical procedure, or bloodwork associated with an illness your pet endured, or a previous urinary tract infection), revealed a POSSIBLE problem. You are being sent this reminder to alert you that it’s time to recheck your pet’s lab work, to verify that there IS or IS NOT a concern with your pet’s internal health. Abnormalities in lab work that commonly show up that need to be double-checked include elevated kidney values, elevated liver values, elevated white blood cell counts, depressed platelet counts, urinary tract infections/crystals, etc. Rechecking your pet’s lab work will indicate whether the abnormality has resolved, or will need to be managed in future.
  2. Your pet has been diagnosed with a chronic medical ailment, such as diabetes or compromised kidney function, and the values need a routine recheck. Routine rechecks, usually twice a year, are critical to proper management of your pet’s chronic health problem, to insure proper management and optimum comfort and longevity for your pet.
  3. Your pet is on long-term anticonvulsant medications, such as phenobarbital or potassium bromide, or is on hormonal supplementation, such as for low thyroid, or is on long-term Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammtant drugs for chronic pain. Serum anticonvulsant medication levels MUST be checked at least annually, as well as a Complete Blood Count and a General Chemistry Panel. If the levels get too low, therefore, ineffective, your pet will start seizing again. If the levels get too high, the anticonvulsant drug becomes dangerous, toxic, and could induce the very seizures it is designed to prevent. The only way to know if the dose of anticonvulsant is correct is to check the serum levels. The only way to make sure the anticonvulsant isn’t causing problems with your pet’s internal organ health is to do blood work. Thyroid and other hormone supplementation must also be checked at least annually–if the dose is too low, your pet will receive no benefit and you will waste your time and money; if the dose is too high, your pet’s health could be seriously harmed. NonSteroidal Anti-Inflammatant Drugs (known as NSAIDs) do a very good job of relieving pain, but they ALL can cause digestive upset, they ALL put stress on the liver, and they ALL lower blood pressure to the kidneys. Therefore, pets on long-term NSAIDs MUST have their liver & kidney health checked at least every 6 months, as well as a complete blod count to verify no chronic blood loss through GIT inflammation.
  4. Your pet is 8 years of age or older, and needs routine blood screens to verify normal internal organ health. All senior pets (8 years +), and, especially geriatric pets (10 years +), should have their internal health assessed via blood work at least annually. The earlier a developing problem is detected, the easier and less expensive it is to manage.

Windmill Animal Hospital has extensive in-house lab test capability; we are able to process most of our patients’ lab testing needs right here at our hospital. This means fast turn-around, and accurate results for you, our client!

Please call or email us today, to discuss your pet’s lab work needs, and get an appointment scheduled.

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